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Old 04-17-2009, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
2,172 posts, read 6,884,536 times
Reputation: 1525

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I've got a 1200 sq. ft. condo. 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths, front and back patios. It's well laid out, at least by my standards. All on one level, big living/dining area with floor to ceiling windows looking at the front patio and a sliding glass door on the back. A decent-sized hallway to guest bed and bath, with the second bath en suite with master bedroom, both with great closet space. Galley-type kitchen which is fine with me. It could be opened up to make it one with the living room. No garage, though.
Property tax (county) is $475 a year, insurance $450. I'm in a little unincorporated area inside city limits so don't pay city property tax, which would be about the same. Condo fee takes care of trash, water, maintenance.

 
Old 04-17-2009, 03:06 PM
 
2,626 posts, read 4,948,496 times
Reputation: 2220
Quote:
Originally Posted by knoxgarden View Post
I've got a 1200 sq. ft. condo. 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths, front and back patios. It's well laid out, at least by my standards. All on one level, big living/dining area with floor to ceiling windows looking at the front patio and a sliding glass door on the back. A decent-sized hallway to guest bed and bath, with the second bath en suite with master bedroom, both with great closet space. Galley-type kitchen which is fine with me. It could be opened up to make it one with the living room. No garage, though.
Property tax (county) is $475 a year, insurance $450. I'm in a little unincorporated area inside city limits so don't pay city property tax, which would be about the same. Condo fee takes care of trash, water, maintenance.
May I ask how much are the condo fees? Does Tennessee have state income taxes? I am still sort of leaning towards Tennessee.
 
Old 04-17-2009, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Sacramento, CA, USA
84 posts, read 191,379 times
Reputation: 52
Talking I've got it!! Can I give it to someone else?

Quote:
Originally Posted by anomoly View Post


I really didn't want to sound like 'I did it, why can't you?' cuz I know I'm one of the fortunate few to have no other commitments or family to consider. And I'm pretty adventurous, so it's actually easier for me. But some here, have been pretty serious, and so I wonder: what happened, is there progress, was it the 'economy crisis' that changed plans? For those in 'discussion mode', I don't mean you. I just lost track of those who sounded ready.
In truth, I'm winking at Wisteria and Nancy theReader right here, but I am catching up with them recently, and yanking their chain! (Do you hear me, Nancy?)
Here's where the business is and how we can bring more people into the 'fold' so there are more people who might want to try out the same areas.

We could write a book. Something like -- "What Boomers Think About When They Decide To Up and move far away for the last third of their lives. From those who have done it and who are working on doing it". No matter where any of us go -- or even if we stay - there always will be lists of points on a topic we can write down, then gather in a book. Self publish, then sell from a web site. If/When it becomes popular, we'll let a book publisher pick it up. The first time we will meet is when the Today Show brings us together in NYC for an interview!!
 
Old 04-17-2009, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
2,172 posts, read 6,884,536 times
Reputation: 1525
Quote:
Originally Posted by plantlover View Post
May I ask how much are the condo fees? Does Tennessee have state income taxes? I am still sort of leaning towards Tennessee.
No income tax in Tennessee. Some investment income may be taxed if not with a Tennessee broker, which is why most brokers have offices in Tennessee. You can live well here cheap. And the people are wonderful. Always offering to help.
Condo fees just went up to $150 a month from $124 a month -- first increase in 4 years. That includes water and any maintenance that has to do with water -- they fix leaky faucets and toilets for free. There's also a swimming pool and tennis and basketball court.
It's an old complex -- 30 years -- and they're replacing roofs and boards that hold up the banks which the increase will pay for. The complex is built down the side of a ridge, which is great. I can open my blinds in the front and the back and see my garden and the trees and grass but no one can see in from the street in front. In the back, I'm up the hill from the condos behind me so I see grass and tree tops when I look out the back.
There are some really nice condos around Knoxville, particularly older ones.
 
Old 04-17-2009, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Sacramento, CA, USA
84 posts, read 191,379 times
Reputation: 52
Thumbs up A GREAT Post!!

WOW Tesaje! That post was GREAT. We need to frame it to keep reminding us about what is important.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tesaje View Post
I think there is and will be more demand for smaller houses, not necessarily tiny houses. In the 20th century up until the 1980s, houses were on average much more modest than they are now. Our cities are filled with these houses. Some have been added to or razed with McMansions put in their place. They were built to get people into their own houses and they were built small to keep costs down.
I grew up in a tract home build right after WWII where ex-soldiers could use their GI benefits to buy. All the homes there were basically the same size. My dad bought it for $12,000 with a 30-year mortgage.

Quote:
Somehow, the baby boomers got the idea that we all need a lot of space but much of those giant houses go unused. I currently live in a modest house of 1800 sq ft in a neighborhood of houses ranging from 1600 to 4000 sq ft with most of them ranging in the 2000-2500 sq ft range. This has become a typical house.
Having your own home, a car in the garage and a chicken in the pot still was what our parents aspired to. They wanted all that for us, plus a college degree. It's what formed our outlooks about how we want to live as adults.

Quote:
At the same time, zoning has become much more restrictive than it used to be. Many places don't just get in your face about orange doors but you can't have non-related tenants any more, you are restricted in the cars you can have, you can't have chickens in your back yard, newer places demand the house be a certain size, you can't have a workshop. ... The list of restrictions goes on and on all to create neighborhoods that look like the Stepford wives and make us spend more and more on our real estate. The real fuel for this is money in the developers pockets and more and more people jump on that bandwagon with the cry of maintaining property values. (Look how well that ended up!)
A bigger house said something very big about the home owners. It's sort of like when men go through a mid-life crisis and buy a big red sportscar. Somewhere along the way, our society was broken up again into a caste system -- poor, middle class, and rich. The war had been a great equalizer.

In my efforts to find people for a cohousing project, this became very obvious, although most people couldn't put words to their thoughts. Finally, one person said "I don't want to live next to a Katrina Cottage. It will hurt my investment (in the home)." That hurts to hear, but it's how many people feel. Smaller home, less money, lower class, more crime, etc. Wonder how those people would feel if they found out the people in the small house had triple the amount of money and choose to live that way because they travel a lot or do thing outdoors.

What I want to know is whatever happened to people buying a home they want to live in because it's comfortable and feels good. Somewhere along the line, we've changed that important point into looking at our homes as an important investment. It puts a very different twist on what we think about homes. Might be a big part of how we ended up where we are today.

Quote:
The house I live in is bigger than the one I grew up in where we had 3 teenagers and 3 bedrooms/2 baths in about 1200 sq ft. Part of how all those people managed to live in what is now considered a small space is that we lived a lot outside. Home was the place to sleep/eat/do homework but rarely to play or do other things.
This is the basic idea behind living simple and in smaller homes. Where do we spend our time? Some is at home, but isn't most of it outside, with friends, or alone? There are many, many people choosing to live in small homes who are tres rich. It's not just for poor people. There also are many neighborhoods where there is a mix of sizes for homes. It doesn't have a negative effect on the mansion next door.

Quote:
I know the people who want this sort of close neighborhood or co-housing usually end up building them. What keeps striking me, is the cry to keep the costs low but then amenities like the common spaces and a common club/work house are demanded to give us some space that is not in a small cottage. The reality is that as soon as you have the commons, then each member must contribute to the costs of building/maintaining/using those commons.
I can see that happens in many projects. My experience is that people keep adding extras to their own individual unit which drives the cost of the home beyond many people's ability to finance. There are quite a few projects that use existing structures for their projects. I suspect those might be less expensive. In cohousing, people pay up front to join, the homes get built, then it usually is made into an LLC (forgive me if I get the details wrong). Any expense for the common house is paid for individually. It surprised me to find out that some common houses are financed by only a few project members as an asset for everyone. This was for a project where the units were full-sized, had their own washer and dryer, etc. The main reason for the common house was to have somewhere where everyone could gather for a pot luck, a common meal, group exercises, a woodworking or hobby shop.

Quote:
The thing that I think is a real future arrangement is the co-ops that have been created where services are performed for the elderly for a monthly fee.
I REALLY like this idea!!!

Quote:
People live in their own homes but when they need something, they call the one number and it gets done for a reasonable cost. Boston started this and there's one in DC now. A Resource Guide to Creating Community in Later Life To me this is the ideal and it can be created in many places. It takes the concept of assisted living and long term care down a step to just being able to keep living comfortably and safely in your homes. We don't have to be isolated in elder communities but it brings people with similar needs together. It takes the concept of buying into it when you don't need it so much to have it when you do (this is the concept that supports insurance). Most important of all, it doesn't require that individuals give up a lifestyle they like or have the same socioeconomic status.
YES! This idea is fairly close to Elder Housing, a newer movement via cohousing. It's still too expensive for most people. There's been a lot said about how spending money to keep people in their own homes is less expensive than running a nursing home (and not as nice).

Quote:
This is what I see here in this group. The thing we have in common is that we expect to live alone without a marriage ora man to help out. But our individual circumstances vary widely as do our desires for how we wish to construct our elder lives. Some of us are facing difficult economic conditions while others have enough to feel safely comfortable but I don't think any of us are really wealthy. All of us want some sort of support community so we don't end up falling with no one to help us or are so lonely we want to die. We want a friendly group to chat with, go on adventures with, borrow a cup of sugar from, discuss the universe with - but not to interfere with our hard-won independence.
You done good!!! Congratulations.
 
Old 04-17-2009, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Sarasota Florida
1,236 posts, read 3,606,705 times
Reputation: 1230
Default plantlover.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by plantlover View Post
Your area and situation sounds wonderful! I am lucky in some ways, 1344 sq. ft home, property taxes $1,119.00 but homeowners insurance, $2,400.00!! I need to look into S. Oregon! I don't need the coast, I've had the coast for 36 years; been there, done that!..
Yeah.... when I lived in Coral Gables, by the time I sold it.... my prop/taxes were about $2800 and homeowners insurance about the same amount, and that was 5 years ago.

If you, or any of the other ladies on this thread, ever venture out west to check out the Rogue Valley .... let me know and I'll try to give you the tour special! Summers are really nice (ride the Rogue River on a jetboat, visit Crater Lake, thrift shopping, antique shopping, a couple of neat quaint small towns like Ashland, Jacksonville, side trip to the coast, etc.) but nothing going on in the winter except a frozen tush
 
Old 04-17-2009, 04:58 PM
 
Location: home...finally, home .
8,235 posts, read 18,505,219 times
Reputation: 17765
This is what I see here in this group. The thing we have in common is that we expect to live alone without a marriage ora man to help out. But our individual circumstances vary widely as do our desires for how we wish to construct our elder lives. Some of us are facing difficult economic conditions while others have enough to feel safely comfortable but I don't think any of us are really wealthy. All of us want some sort of support community so we don't end up falling with no one to help us or are so lonely we want to die. We want a friendly group to chat with, go on adventures with, borrow a cup of sugar from, discuss the universe with - but not to interfere with our hard-won independence

Yes, I would say that this is exactly correct. You are very perceptive to have put it so exactly; I think every one of us on this thread would agree with you .
__________________
******************


People may not recall what you said to them, but they will always remember how you made them feel .
 
Old 04-17-2009, 05:07 PM
 
2,626 posts, read 4,948,496 times
Reputation: 2220
Yep, you hit the nail on the head!
 
Old 04-17-2009, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,964,817 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tesaje View Post
There was a time when I would have loved to live in Santa Cruz. But it really looks to me like California is not a good place to move into these days unless you have beaucoup bucks. Their taxes are very high and there are few to no breaks for retired or old people. I think it is different for the people who live there already as there are some significant tax breaks you can carry on with you. If I already lived there, it might be a different story but I think I would do better in some other states.
Tesaje, where are you looking now (what states, and why?). Forgive me if you've already told us....I'm trying to keep up with everyone's story and progress....

Last edited by RiverBird; 04-17-2009 at 07:49 PM..
 
Old 04-17-2009, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,964,817 times
Reputation: 15649
mmhere said:
...it's how many people feel. Smaller home, less money, lower class, more crime, etc. Wonder how those people would feel if they found out the people in the small house had triple the amount of money and choose to live that way because they travel a lot or do thing outdoors.
---------

I've lived in a neighborhood w huge expensive homes, right next door to a major drug dealer. Can't judge a book by its cover...
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