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Unread 04-18-2009, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
1,921 posts, read 1,172,155 times
Reputation: 2706
Default Looking everywhere

I have no specific place in mind. I've thought about, San Angelo, TX; Huntsville, AL; Austin, TX; Las Cruces, NM; Santa Fe, NM; Knoxville, TN; Chico, CA; Charleston, SC; and Savannah, GA; St. Augustine, FL; Vero Beach, Fl; and any other place even mentioned in passing on City-Data. I've never visited most of of these places.

I have one child who lives in NH (WAY too cold), a child in Northern Virginia and a child who lives with me. My father and siblings live within a couple of miles of me. I'm not sure I'd be looking for another home if it wasn't for the cold. Now I know y'all think it's not cold in Maryland, but I'm telling you, I'm finding the cold intolerable. So, Knoxville sounds lovely, but it appears to be as cold as Maryland. San Angelo, TX is probably too hot (noticed quite a few days above 100 - but little humidity), etc. etc. I'll probably just wait and see where everyone else retires and follow them.
(Does the group need an elder law attorney? Just kidding...I can't imagine sitting for another state's bar exam.)
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Unread 04-19-2009, 12:04 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW / CO / SA TX / Thailand
9,997 posts, read 15,312,691 times
Reputation: 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerryC11 View Post
I'm wondering if smaller towns can afford to have services like a senior van. Does anyone know? ...
The PNW has pretty good senior transportation to small towns. Some regional transit runs out, or programs like 'Dial-a-ride'. Some seniors we helped care for got daily rides to and from the senior nutrition lunch program for nearly 20 yrs (Town of 12,000 ~ 20 miles away from transit district. It was really the joy of their day, they played accordion and sang together, often as "special music!"
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Unread 04-19-2009, 12:43 AM
 
Location: Alaska
364 posts, read 531,996 times
Reputation: 157
TerryC11 - I have thought of climate change. My first thoughts on it were that if I just stayed put I would be in paradise . I was wrong. Apparently, climate change and warmer temperatures mean more rain for SE Alaska. Currently, depending upon where in the area one lives, we get 90-120 inches per year. Not sure I can handle more.
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Unread 04-19-2009, 06:56 AM
 
Location: New England
10,691 posts, read 6,445,855 times
Reputation: 7079
Reading back over many of the posts it occurs to me that we can't have everything. We each have to prioritize. Many of us want access to arts and culture for instance, but do we need to live within a city to get that? How often can we afford to go to a concert or theater? How often to galleries etc? We can make a day/eve or weekend of it if we live close to, but not on top of it.

For me, even tho I'm an artist and thrive on the arts, top of my list is that I have to relate to the landscape in some primary, aesthetic way...is it nice to look at, does it feel like I belong there? Second, is the town near anything truly dangerous like a toxic dump or nuke plant?

Third, as you've heard my ranting, is property taxes and other taxes/costs.

Fourth, how easy is it to travel to see my family? Do I have to take complicated and expensive airline routes, etc?

Somewhere in there is liberal vs. conservative. Though more of a liberal, I value many conservative views (not all), so I don't have to live in liberal-land. I can also compromise on whether I'm right on top of the "arts & culture" scene. And I can try to get by without a Trader Joe's or Whole Foods. Many decent and often organic foods in supermarkets.

In terms of global climate change, I'm counting on being in Happy Acres before the s*** hits the fan. Anyway, it appears to be totally unpredictable as to what will happen where. NE may get unbearable heat in the summer, and more than usual brutal winters. Who ever thought a tornado would whip through MY neighborhood in NE??? Well one did, last summer. Wild sporadic microbursts within seconds, trees, wires down everywhere, a frightening nightmare. Parts of the South have had real cold spells. Kentucky suffered a horrific ice storm. So I don't think anyone's safe in that respect. All we can do is try to find a sturdy structure to live in, close to emergency help if possible.

Today is my open house. I have to get back to polishing the old place. Hope everyone has a great day...
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Unread 04-19-2009, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Sacramento, CA, USA
84 posts, read 120,321 times
Reputation: 52
Wink Arkansas or New York?

Did an informal tally of states mentioned on this board in the past few weeks. Montana is the only state that scored well in two areas. Mainly, if a state had no sales tax, they made up for it somewhere else.

CNNMoney.com: Taxes by state 2005, by rate

CNNMoney Tax Survey 2005

STATES WITHOUT PERSONAL INCOME TAX
Alaska
Tennessee*
Florida
Texas
Nevada
Washington
New Hampshire*
Wyoming
South Dakota
*Tennessee and New Hampshire do tax dividend and interest income.

LOCAL PROPERTY TAXES (Per capita/year*)
5 BEST STATES
Arkansas $191
Alabama $285
Kentucky $376
New Mexico $380
Oklahoma $425

5 WORST STATES
New Jersey $1,871
Connecticut $1,733
Maine $1,439
New York $1,402
Rhode Island $1,368

U.S. average $935
*Based on 2002 census data, the latest currently available.
Source: Tax Foundation

Same thing from LandReport.com based on 2008 info:

Lowest Property Taxes:
1. Alabama ($477)
2. Arkansas ($527)
3. New Mexico ($539)
4. Oklahoma ($562)
5. Kentucky ($620)

Highest Property Taxes:
1. New Jersey ($2,642)
2. Connecticut ($2,393)
3. New Hampshire ($2,320)
4. Wyoming ($2,175)
5. New York ($2,124)

STATE SALES TAX BURDENS
HIGHEST RATES
Mississippi 7.00%
Tennessee 7.00%
Rhode Island 7.00%
Minnesota 6.50%
Washington 6.50%
California 6.25% (Been at 7.75 for years, now 9%)

NO SALES TAX*
Alaska
Oregon
Montana
Delaware
New Hampshire

*Localities within a state may impose a sales tax.
Source: CCH Inc.

STATES OFFERING RETIREES INCOME-TAX BREAKS
Arizona Arkansas Colorado Hawaii
Illinois Kentucky Louisiana Maryland
Michigan Montana New York North Dakota
Ohio Oklahoma Pennsylvania Utah
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Unread 04-19-2009, 06:10 PM
 
Location: home...finally, home .
7,802 posts, read 11,242,378 times
Reputation: 16349
Thanks for all of that info, mmhere. Now, if only I could figure out how one balances off the other.
__________________
******************


Be kinder than necessary for everyone is fighting some kind of battle.
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Unread 04-20-2009, 01:29 AM
 
Location: Sacramento, CA, USA
84 posts, read 120,321 times
Reputation: 52
Darn! I was counting on someone here knowing how apples to apples compare based on all this info!!
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Unread 04-20-2009, 07:30 AM
 
Location: New England
10,691 posts, read 6,445,855 times
Reputation: 7079
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmhere View Post
Did an informal tally of states mentioned on this board in the past few weeks. Montana is the only state that scored well in two areas. Mainly, if a state had no sales tax, they made up for it somewhere else.

CNNMoney.com: Taxes by state 2005, by rate

CNNMoney Tax Survey 2005

STATES WITHOUT PERSONAL INCOME TAX
Alaska
Tennessee*
Florida
Texas
Nevada
Washington
New Hampshire*
Wyoming
South Dakota
*Tennessee and New Hampshire do tax dividend and interest income.

LOCAL PROPERTY TAXES (Per capita/year*)
5 BEST STATES
Arkansas $191
Alabama $285
Kentucky $376
New Mexico $380
Oklahoma $425

5 WORST STATES
New Jersey $1,871
Connecticut $1,733
Maine $1,439
New York $1,402
Rhode Island $1,368

U.S. average $935
*Based on 2002 census data, the latest currently available.
Source: Tax Foundation

Same thing from LandReport.com based on 2008 info:

Lowest Property Taxes:
1. Alabama ($477)
2. Arkansas ($527)
3. New Mexico ($539)
4. Oklahoma ($562)
5. Kentucky ($620)

Highest Property Taxes:
1. New Jersey ($2,642)
2. Connecticut ($2,393)
3. New Hampshire ($2,320)
4. Wyoming ($2,175)
5. New York ($2,124)

STATE SALES TAX BURDENS
HIGHEST RATES
Mississippi 7.00%
Tennessee 7.00%
Rhode Island 7.00%
Minnesota 6.50%
Washington 6.50%
California 6.25% (Been at 7.75 for years, now 9%)

NO SALES TAX*
Alaska
Oregon
Montana
Delaware
New Hampshire

*Localities within a state may impose a sales tax.
Source: CCH Inc.

STATES OFFERING RETIREES INCOME-TAX BREAKS
Arizona Arkansas Colorado Hawaii
Illinois Kentucky Louisiana Maryland
Michigan Montana New York North Dakota
Ohio Oklahoma Pennsylvania Utah
Thanks for all the data, wow. What I don't understand is the "per capita" in property tax...how do we interpret that? Whether there's one person or six in a house, the prop taxes are still the same....

I'd also like to know which states "freeze" property taxes or give some kind of a reduction for seniors, and at what age.

Thanks again!
~~NewEnglGirl
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Unread 04-20-2009, 09:02 AM
 
Location: NEPA
65 posts, read 82,559 times
Reputation: 37
Default I'm right there with you, New England Girl.

Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Dear Wondering Where,
I haven't seen your posts before. What is your situation? Are you in New Engl?

I need all the positive support I can get in finally listing my house. It's not something I would prefer to do. I've poured a lot of $ into this fixer-upper over the past 10 yrs and finally the house is DONE (to the extent an old ranch can be done), and the area is beautiful, so that's why it's so hard to leave. But the isolation in the burbs, and esp the rising prop taxes, are pushing me to change my living situation. Wherever I move next is the final move before the (subsidized) happy valley old folks home

I have to stay positive and not get fearful! Anyone else out there at my age (60+) living on the edge and wondering what to do and how to cope??

~~NewEnglGirl
Hi there, New England Girl. I am in central PA (small town separated by mountains from other small towns. Can't decide if I am in the middle of nowhere or the middle of everywhere). At least an hour from any meaningful jobs or shopping, up and down mountains. Gorgeous, yes, lonely much. Your post about being busy all day and nothing getting done....boy, can I relate. Thanks for that.

I know how you feel about the rest, too. It is scary. You are taking positive steps, though, and I just know this forum is making all of us stronger. It is good to be able to see we aren't really alone. Thanks to everyone here, too.

NewEnglandGirl, you asked if anyone else feels they are living on the edge and wondering what to do and how to cope. Count me in on that one. I am kind of stressed but trying to come up with answers, just like you. Honestly, I think almost everyone here is in the same boat, from what I can see. You said you are trying to keep positive...great! Because it is very obvious you are an intelligent being who is going to make it work, and very well.

You asked my situation. I have an inexpensive paid for house, and another inexpensive rental that I never make any money on, but once sold will be another little bit. The only thing about that is, a single mom with 4 little ones lives there and I guess will do so for years to come, so no help there, and if there is a big repair there, uh oh.....I am starting a personal protection and surveillance products company on a teensy budget. I need some type of income and I like these products. Even if I sold my house, I would probably only net $40,000 or so, and then what? I love my little house, but I feel intellectually, emotionally, and even physically suffocated.

It is winter here most of the year and rare sun. I really need to leave. Nowhere to walk, plus it is freezing even now, April 20.

Seems a lot of this angst comes down to money. I don't have any children, only my precious pets. So it doesn't really matter where I go. Only where is the $$$$. Gotta get to making some by myself, as there are no jobs here.

I am 57 and not employed elsewhere. Living off the proceeds of a house sale last year but that has dwindled down to almost nothing. I am a widow and will be delighted if in 2 1/2 years Social Security is still around so that I can collect my husband's as a surviving spouse. Not counting on it, though, so I need to make money Now.

I see in a later post that you have listed your house...I wish you the best and will be looking for how that is going. I wanted to reply now, as I have been absent since you posted this...wanted to let you know I appreciate your interest and that I know what you are going through, because you could be me talking. And we really do have a lot to be grateful for. I need to take time to remember the good things. Like how I give thanks for my breakfast every day. Then off to the whirlwind I go........Take real good care, Girl.
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Unread 04-20-2009, 09:23 AM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 7,983,923 times
Reputation: 1969
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Thanks for all the data, wow. What I don't understand is the "per capita" in property tax...how do we interpret that? Whether there's one person or six in a house, the prop taxes are still the same....

I'd also like to know which states "freeze" property taxes or give some kind of a reduction for seniors, and at what age.

Thanks again!
~~NewEnglGirl
The devil's in details. Per capita is just a way to average out the costs. They take the property tax receipts reported from the states and divide it by the number of people int he states. This is probably a fake number because there are far fewer properties than there are people in any jurisdiction so the per capita number will be lower than a per property number. I don't find these sorts of reports to be very useful in figuring out what it means to me.

When I was looking at this, I saw no reductions before age 65. Often they will also have a income limit that is pretty low for the reduction to take effect. But it does vary a lot. Sometimes, the state will vary from county to county making figureing this out much harder.
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