U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 03-18-2010, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,955 posts, read 7,400,186 times
Reputation: 16293

Advertisements

I've seen the signs along the road that say not to pick up anyone hitchhiking around these areas.

 
Old 03-18-2010, 11:47 AM
 
4,575 posts, read 7,067,487 times
Reputation: 4227
I'll definitely put Loveland in my list to check out.

Goodness, do people still pick up hitchhikers these days...I can't imagine?
 
Old 03-19-2010, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,955 posts, read 7,400,186 times
Reputation: 16293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tesaje View Post
Escapees are a danger but so are some parolees. They start out from the prison. I went to college 10 miles from a state prison. Released parolees created a crime bump. The bad ones made a beeline looking for naive kids to prey on.

I would not choose a location near a prison. Old women are easy prey.

Canon City is a pretty area. But there are a lot of other pretty areas in CO.
I've never thought about the parolees - we seem to hear about them a lot these days.
 
Old 03-20-2010, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Simmering in DFW
6,948 posts, read 19,484,684 times
Reputation: 7208
I want to live in a communal housing development that has individual homes; that has or tolerates a dog rescue group and has a community garden for growing its veggies somewhere in mild climate near interesting terrain and good hiking trails and a university. Maybe even that has a shared shuttle service for errands, etc. Oh, I'd also like to spend under $250k for my retirement home. Pipedream?
 
Old 03-20-2010, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,372 posts, read 9,872,889 times
Reputation: 10243
Squirl,

Oh, me too! But I'd like to spend under $150,000 for my home...but need not a lot of space..I'd like a communal rec/library/yoga/dance/gym building, too.
 
Old 03-20-2010, 04:48 PM
 
Location: SW US
2,223 posts, read 2,039,757 times
Reputation: 3834
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squirl View Post
I want to live in a communal housing development that has individual homes; that has or tolerates a dog rescue group and has a community garden for growing its veggies somewhere in mild climate near interesting terrain and good hiking trails and a university. Maybe even that has a shared shuttle service for errands, etc. Oh, I'd also like to spend under $250k for my retirement home. Pipedream?
I've been wanting to do something like this near Ft. Collins Colorado. My goal is to keep houses below $200k but allow people to build their own small house within guidelines, so they could cost less. It's not such a mild climate though.
If we want to have what we dream about, we have to just do it ourselves!
 
Old 03-20-2010, 09:06 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,556,181 times
Reputation: 6928
I have been reading this thread and there is much interest in Ft. Collins and Loveland. I would like to add my opinion. I think Ft. Collins is a beautiful town but I would not live there because I have no desire to live in a College Town. I did it when I went to college. I did it when I moved to Colorado--I lived in Boulder. Now that I am a senior, I want to live in a more balanced community. I would pick Loveland because you have that balance and you are close enough to Ft. Collins to enjoy the amenities. Also, Loveland can be much cheaper.

I like to throw Longmont into consideration. It is nice city and is close enough to Boulder and Ft. Collins where you can go. Longmont actually has a nice old downtown. It has many parks and I think it is a very relaxing place to live. It is definitely cheaper than Boulder, Ft. Collins and Loveland. It has excellent public transit as it is in the RTD (Regional Transportation District). You can easily get express regional buses to Boulder and most importantly to Denver. For Denver is a great city and has the top medical facilities, and entertainment amenities in the area.

You can also look at Louisville which has been picked as the best city to live by Money Magazine. The adjacent town of Lafayette is very nice. These offer many of the same advantages of Longmont.

Actually in my mind the best place to live in Colorado is in Denver or one of the close in suburbs. I live in Arvada which is a quiet suburbs that has much open space, parks and trails and is a good economical place to live. You then have then great advantages of better public transit. I would also consider Wheat Ridge and Lakewood. The western suburbs of Denver are the older suburbs, with many new areas, but have good access to all the parks along the foothills. You are very close to Denver and all that it has to offer. It should also be noted that Tornadoes are very rare, close to the Mountain Foothills--they cannot form easily as farther out into the plains.

Denver and its suburbs are not as dense as many other metro areas. There are extensive parks, trails and open space throughout the area. There are good walkable neighborhoods with excellent shopping and good public transit. There is a style of living that can fit all desires and needs. I have tried on the Denver forum to show people how to find a neighborhoods where one can minimize driving or stop driving entirely.

The trick is to find a good basic supermarket and shopping. In this area, King Soopers is the economical leader. Overlay a map of the public transit. Find the health care facilities that you need. Put all these together and you can find a nice little neighborhood. Parks are also important but in the Denver area--they are everywhere. I have found as I have got older that my neighborhood has become more of my stomping ground. I rarely now drive to distant parts of the metro area. I am not young anymore and I do not have the hormone gushing to push me into bars and nightclubs. I prefer to do my activities in the daytime. I live very close to Downtown Denver and some good vibrant neighborhoods in the city, so I can get all that I need with little driving. Eventually, I hope to not drive at all.

One very important issue about Colorado. Most people live, work and recreate on the Great Plains. Most people do not go to the Mountains on a regular basis and many never go. Most people do not ski. Most people are not avid hikers, hunters or have any use for the mountains other than occasional driving to look at the sites. For a senior, the best economical and sensible areas to live is on the plains. I have always said that the necessities for seniors are access to good and extensive health care plus excellent public transit. That is why the Greater Denver area is a good choice. The mountains do not provide these necessities.

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 03-20-2010 at 09:24 PM..
 
Old 03-21-2010, 09:57 AM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,244,051 times
Reputation: 14870
Livecontent -

Would you know - what would be an economical town in the hills or at the base of the Rockies?

Is there such a thing?

Public transit is not important. Pine trees are. Not a ski resort (ghods forbid!), but a nice quiet village tucked away in a corner somewhere?

If you could suggest a few place names, I'd be very grateful! I'm currently looking in the White Mountains and Rim Country of Arizona, but all this talk of Colorado has me wondering ...
 
Old 03-21-2010, 12:51 PM
 
2 posts, read 3,045 times
Reputation: 10
Hello Wisteria,
I find your situation very similar to mine. I however may be on an even lower income as I do not have a retirement only savings and social security. I am not yet at the age to retire but I am looking for a city that has all the amenities that you mentioned. I am a massage therapist and would like to continue that work.
Roxford
 
Old 03-21-2010, 01:19 PM
 
Location: SW US
2,223 posts, read 2,039,757 times
Reputation: 3834
Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
I have been reading this thread and there is much interest in Ft. Collins and Loveland. I would like to add my opinion. I think Ft. Collins is a beautiful town but I would not live there because I have no desire to live in a College Town. I did it when I went to college. I did it when I moved to Colorado--I lived in Boulder. Now that I am a senior, I want to live in a more balanced community. I would pick Loveland because you have that balance and you are close enough to Ft. Collins to enjoy the amenities. Also, Loveland can be much cheaper.

Livecontent
I intentionally chose Ft. Collins BECAUSE it is a college town. I want to live in a place that has a sizable university and all that goes along with it - lectures, stimulating cultural activities, a more educated population, etc. etc. Boulder was my first choice but I can't afford to live there.

Different strokes for different folks!
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top