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Old 10-08-2010, 11:21 AM
 
Location: SW US
2,220 posts, read 2,037,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingscot47 View Post
I am interested in hearing how other people are researching places to live that are not car dependent. I have lived in New York city but would prefer a less urban more greener place.
I'd be interested in what others have to say about this too

 
Old 10-08-2010, 11:32 AM
 
433 posts, read 992,314 times
Reputation: 389
I lived in San Francisco. In my post I meant things are better for me personally after the move because I was in a comfortable rut there and here everything is new and fresh. The change was good for me; I'm sleeping much better here. I live near lovely hiking trails, but I want to be within a mile or so of shops so I can run errands on foot.

You're right about the costs of a car. I sold mine and bought mutual funds with the money 12 years ago when I moved from Marin County to SF within walking distance of work. I didn't miss the car in SF and I don't want to buy another one; also, my driving reflexes are rusty and I have never driven in sleet and snow, so I'd have to take a few lessons before buying another car.

I'm eager to sell this place and move to a downtown apartment or condo in the larger city; the stumbling block is finding a handyman who has time to make a small repair to a closet door before this place goes on the market.

Good luck to you in your hunt. If you intend to buy a place in Sacramento, now would be a good time because prices are still low there according to what I hear from friends.
 
Old 10-08-2010, 12:29 PM
 
4,574 posts, read 7,063,489 times
Reputation: 4222
since I will be a woman retiring alone to a new city...boy, I'm getting a little discouraged. I've researched and visited quite a few places (and gotten alot of good information thanks to this forum). Every place that seems to meet even my most basic criteria is still quite expensive to live. Course my 1st choice is New England, around Boston area, and NH since it's close by. Even the Providence area is someplace I would consider. I have always felt drawn to NE so I wonder if I should just go for it, when I'm ready. I just don't know if I can handle those winters again, especially as I age.
And since I have about 3 more years to go, who knows what the economy will be like.

I mean, places like Charleston, NC, Texas, TN certainly have their own appeal and advantages, but I just don't see myself living there. I would have alot more peace if I really knew where I was headed!
 
Old 10-08-2010, 01:13 PM
 
433 posts, read 992,314 times
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loveautumn, if you feel NE is the right place for you, why not try relocating there? After you're retired you can stay home on bitterly cold days instead of commuting to work. We have only one life, so why settle for a place we're not wild about if we can possibly manage to live where we want?
 
Old 10-08-2010, 01:33 PM
 
4,574 posts, read 7,063,489 times
Reputation: 4222
thanks for the encouraging words! that's kind of what I figure. But I do worry about the cold and snow..I mean I'm sure I could get around driving in it at 66 but I have to think long-term...what about 76? I guess I just have some fear about making a major mistake which I really can't afford to do.

I do also love parts of Virginia and even though the COL would be the same, it might not be as tough on me, weather wise.

But hopefully I'll have at least 3 years to figure it out. Even during the past few years, there are places that I never thought I would even remotely consider, but that has changed...so in 3 years who knows how I'll feel.
 
Old 10-08-2010, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,985,208 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by riverbird View Post
loveautumn, if you feel NE is the right place for you, why not try relocating there? After you're retired you can stay home on bitterly cold days instead of commuting to work. We have only one life, so why settle for a place we're not wild about if we can possibly manage to live where we want?
As a longtime NewEnglander, I always loved the cold and snow until I got into my 40s and was still working and having to get up in the wee hours to shovel and scrape. Now that I'm about retired, even though I did dream a lot about a warmer winter I found that those places just gave me something I absolutely cannot stand: unbearably hot humid summers. It has started to get cold up here and I don't mind it so far because I can limit my outings and stay home whenever I want. It is really very different experience being able to experience winter without the daily job.

Boston area can be pricey. New Hampshire taxes, beware. May I recommend beautiful WMass. So much to do here, loads of arts and culture and events all over the place. And it's not the big city.
 
Old 10-08-2010, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Salem,Oregon
306 posts, read 338,069 times
Reputation: 853
Quote:
Originally Posted by Windwalker2 View Post
I'd be interested in what others have to say about this too
Me too! I ahve been looking at sites that focus on downtown living and walkability of places. Are links to other sites allowed here? In case they are not I have been using a site called walkscore. It's not perfect but can at least give you an idea of what's available (shopping, restuarants, parks,buses etc) in an area you are interested in. I have also found Google Maps will show transit options where available. Downtown is more expensive for housing (rent or purchase) but if I can walk to parks, library, grocery, maybe a community garden and a college/University it would be worth it, to me anyway.
 
Old 10-09-2010, 02:07 AM
 
239 posts, read 456,163 times
Reputation: 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
As a longtime NewEnglander, I always loved the cold and snow until I got into my 40s and was still working and having to get up in the wee hours to shovel and scrape. Now that I'm about retired, even though I did dream a lot about a warmer winter I found that those places just gave me something I absolutely cannot stand: unbearably hot humid summers. It has started to get cold up here and I don't mind it so far because I can limit my outings and stay home whenever I want. It is really very different experience being able to experience winter without the daily job.

Boston area can be pricey. New Hampshire taxes, beware. May I recommend beautiful WMass. So much to do here, loads of arts and culture and events all over the place. And it's not the big city.

Which towns in WMass have what you are describing? I'm originally from the Boston area (born in Winthrop), but we moved to the west coast when I was in grade school, so know very little about Boston and nothing about WMass.

There are more affordable places such as Tennessee, but being a northerner at heart I would like to at least research New England before ruling it out as too expensive to consider.

The cold snowy winters are a little scary since the coldest places I've lived as an adult are Oregon, Colorado, and North Carolina. All have some snow, but it wasn't all that cold.

Anyway, I'd love to hear which towns you would recommend in WMass. Thanks!
 
Old 10-09-2010, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Scotland(Robert Burns Country)
62 posts, read 88,092 times
Reputation: 83
Default The Quest Continues

Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonbirder View Post
Me too! I ahve been looking at sites that focus on downtown living and walkability of places. Are links to other sites allowed here? In case they are not I have been using a site called walkscore. It's not perfect but can at least give you an idea of what's available (shopping, restuarants, parks,buses etc) in an area you are interested in. I have also found Google Maps will show transit options where available. Downtown is more expensive for housing (rent or purchase) but if I can walk to parks, library, grocery, maybe a community garden and a college/University it would be worth it, to me anyway.

I know this is probably belongs in another thread but today I cut my adult daughter(28) off from my credit cards. Now I feel I can go where my heart leads me--instead of feeling guilty about being there for her.
 
Old 10-09-2010, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,954 posts, read 7,396,297 times
Reputation: 16288
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingscot47 View Post
I know this is probably belongs in another thread but today I cut my adult daughter(28) off from my credit cards. Now I feel I can go where my heart leads me--instead of feeling guilty about being there for her.
Congratulations! Excellent move!
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