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Old 05-07-2011, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,985,208 times
Reputation: 15649

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Quote:
Originally Posted by xz2y View Post
I hope Arabian returns to answer these questions also. I have looked at various EU countries re: a US citizen getting a retirement visa and none of these visas exist to my knowledge. Getting a residency visa in an EU country requires showing a lot of money in the bank, or a lot of money being deposited monthly into one's bank account, as I recall. I haven't checked lately, but some EU consulate websites don't list an exact amount of money needed, and it becomes a moving target (in Italy, for example).

You also have to be self-sufficient in terms of health insurance living in an EU country. (Medicare doesn't cover international health care costs.) Finding private health insurance to cover you as a US citizen in an EU country after age 60 is difficult and very expensive. I've checked some international policies online. And I regularly visit expatforum.com. Again, I'd be interested in hearing from Arabian re: more details from their experience or knowledge.
Hey xz2y, how was Kansas??

 
Old 05-07-2011, 05:11 PM
 
433 posts, read 992,314 times
Reputation: 389
When are you moving, NEgirl?

Here's my update: My place in ND has sold and I'm moving in less than two weeks. I've spent a lot of time in the last several months researching various cities and have decided to try Austin! I've taken a year's lease on a nice centrally-located apartment. If I can function in the heat, I'll buy a condo next spring. If not, I'll go back to SF.

I chose Austin because it has everything I'm interested in and more, and my sister and best friend lives less than two hours away. The heat is the big question. I don't have to commute to work, but I need to get out of the house every day.
 
Old 05-07-2011, 05:11 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,552,001 times
Reputation: 6928
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
LiveContent, a very timely post, above. I have mobility problems--some days it is much much worse, and some days not so bad, but never "good." Some days I can walk 1/3 to 1/2 mile, others I have to completely stay off my feet. I am thrilled to have found a house in a small college town about 1/2 hour from my current house (I believe it just sold) where there is a bus stop at the end of my street and a senior center with senior van that will come if I need it. Do I look elderly?? I don't think so, so I'll have to show an ID for services. Finding this house in this town is a real blessing because I can foresee the day when I will not be driving. I intend to do a car share until then, as I only need a car maybe twice a week. I'm not sure if my "sharer" has to have driving insurance, will find out. Gas is very close to $4/gal here and that is a major reason for my move to this particular place. Supermarket, dentist, dog hospital, senior ctr, gas station, hair salon, library all around the corner (walkable on my better days). About one mile away is a college campus, movie theatre, bookshop, deli, p.o., and other shops. The only thing is that the property taxes are higher in that town, the only downside to the move! Your point about planning ahead (the years zip by fast) in terms of getting around in older age is very well taken, and you have influenced my decision to move to this particular place.
I think a some small college town is ideal for many retirees and I am happy you found a good place to live. Boulder, which is close to where I live, is good town because of the excellent bus service with very frequent circular service around town. It is dense enough with good walkable services nearby. In addition, the University community provides excellent stimulation and entertainment.

The big problem with Boulder is that it is very expensive. I have lived in Boulder, when I was younger and it was good but today, I do not necessarily want to be in a town that is dominated by students--but that is me. If I wanted to be near the advantages of a University, I think I would pick a larger city. This way I can live close enough to the University to get the benefits of the intellectual community, but get away to other balanced activities; and not be totally surrounded by youthful gushing hormones. In addition, larger cities provide more extensive public transit.

Though, if I was to live in a small college town in Colorado, I think I would pick Fort Collins because it has more of a balanced western/midwestern feel than Boulder. Actually, I would live in Loveland, just to the south. Loveland attracts many retirees. It is much more peaceful and it is close enough to Fort Collins to benefit from the University experience. Fort Collins and Loveland are consequently ranked as good places to live--I think they deserve the reputation.

Livecontent
 
Old 05-07-2011, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,985,208 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by riverbird View Post
When are you moving, NEgirl?

Here's my update: My place in ND has sold and I'm moving in less than two weeks. I've spent a lot of time in the last several months researching various cities and have decided to try Austin! I've taken a year's lease on a nice centrally-located apartment. If I can function in the heat, I'll buy a condo next spring. If not, I'll go back to SF.

I chose Austin because it has everything I'm interested in and more, and my sister and best friend lives less than two hours away. The heat is the big question. I don't have to commute to work, but I need to get out of the house every day.
I'm moving June 3. Time to round up the kids, it's payback time.

I didn't know you were looking at Austin. Big city, no?
SF--big city, lovely, pricey....
Nice that you'll be living near sis and friend!
 
Old 05-07-2011, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,985,208 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
Fort Collins and Loveland are consequently ranked as good places to live--I think they deserve the reputation. Livecontent
Isn't that area kind of flat and prone to tornadoes--kind of like Missouri is?

If these towns are attracting well to do retirees, property taxes will most likely rise (?)
 
Old 05-07-2011, 06:51 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,552,001 times
Reputation: 6928
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Isn't that area kind of flat and prone to tornadoes--kind of like Missouri is?

If these towns are attracting well to do retirees, property taxes will most likely rise (?)
Tornadoes do not form readily along the areas that are along the foothills of the Rockies, so these hazards are very rare. It is when you get further out into the plains when they become more common.The City Propers of Loveland and Fort Collins ar tucked right against the Foothills.

In over 32 years, in the Denver area, I have rarely seen or heard of a tornado in and around the city and the western suburbs. The ones I can remember have been farther east, north and southeast in the suburbs--even that has been rare.

I do not know the relationship between an area that attracts retirees and the rise in property taxes. Why would it rise?? It could also fall, depending on many factors. If the retirees are fairly well off, would they then bring more taxes from their pensions and demand less of social services?? I do not know the answer.

The big issue in the rise of cost in the area of Fort Collins/Loveland is that it has got so much good media coverage and recommendations that more people have moved there; the demand for property has increased, property values have gone up. I assume the cities collect more taxes on this increase in value.

There so many issues looking for a place in retirement and sometimes I think we look to broadly and think the whole area has to meet our needs. In reality, as you get older, you move around less and the importance of your neighborhood, your local supermarket, your local bus, local healthcare, the park, the library and the few miles around where you live is all that really matters.

I have lived in NYC and I have seen people who have lived in neighborhoods of that huge city their whole lives. Their neighborhood actually becomes their small "town". So, you can create a small living community of a "town" in even a large metropolitan areas. You get a feel for it when you watch, the TV show "Seinfeld". As you see they do much walking to local amenities--this is realistic in NYC.

I have found that some of these city neighborhoods have more of small town feel than authentic real small town. They have more walkable close areas, everthing is available in the neighborhood or a short bus/subway/rail distance away. Many small towns do not have good services and shopping, no public transit and the people have to drive a distance to healthcare and shopping; many times a Walmart, miles away.

Livecontent
 
Old 05-07-2011, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,954 posts, read 7,396,297 times
Reputation: 16288
Default Congrats NEG & Riverbird!!

Glad you two are moving forward. Austin? What a change from ND - hope it works out.

Neg - Your town sounds perfect - what's happening with your current house?

I've been hearing bad stories about home prices dropping again here - not good. Then I look up 2 houses within 1-2 blocks that are for sale and am shocked by the high price on each - really modest type homes so who knows what's really going on. I'll keep following them to see what they sell for.

Riverbird - Did you get what you wanted on your home?

I like to see good things about Ft Collins & Loveland - these are 2 towns I hope to visit in late summer/early fall (depending on gas prices).

Had a lovely day outside today - more clean up and I found 2 10th grade boys in the neighbohood that are going to mow my yard this summer - $20.00 a pop Can't tell you how happy this makes me.

They will clean my gutters for $30.00 It's about $200 normally to have it done. I have to speak to their moms to see if that's OK - I'm too chicken to do it myself and these boys are only in the 10th grade - that may not happen.

Time to wash the grunge off - have a good weekend & good mom's day (if applic.)
 
Old 05-07-2011, 07:05 PM
 
2,627 posts, read 4,954,783 times
Reputation: 2225
Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
I think a some small college town is ideal for many retirees and I am happy you found a good place to live. Boulder, which is close to where I live, is good town because of the excellent bus service with very frequent circular service around town. It is dense enough with good walkable services nearby. In addition, the University community provides excellent stimulation and entertainment.

The big problem with Boulder is that it is very expensive. I have lived in Boulder, when I was younger and it was good but today, I do not necessarily want to be in a town that is dominated by students--but that is me. If I wanted to be near the advantages of a University, I think I would pick a larger city. This way I can live close enough to the University to get the benefits of the intellectual community, but get away to other balanced activities; and not be totally surrounded by youthful gushing hormones. In addition, larger cities provide more extensive public transit.

Though, if I was to live in a small college town in Colorado, I think I would pick Fort Collins because it has more of a balanced western/midwestern feel than Boulder. Actually, I would live in Loveland, just to the south. Loveland attracts many retirees. It is much more peaceful and it is close enough to Fort Collins to benefit from the University experience. Fort Collins and Loveland are consequently ranked as good places to live--I think they deserve the reputation.

Livecontent
I too have Colorado on my list of places to visit. Livecontent, your comments are so very sensible and your advice very wise. I thank you for posting them.
 
Old 05-07-2011, 07:40 PM
 
433 posts, read 992,314 times
Reputation: 389
June 3 will be here before you know it, NEgirl! I hope the move goes smoothly with your kids' help.

Thanks, Umbria. I sold the home for less than I paid for it last summer, but I'm pleased that it sold so quickly. 10th graders are 14 or 15, right? Definitely old enough to do that type of work. I hope their parents let them take the jobs.

Today was a lovely day in Bismarck. Two weeks ago we were in deep winter and now suddenly we're in summer! The seasons change so fast here they make my head spin.
 
Old 05-07-2011, 07:58 PM
 
250 posts, read 648,942 times
Reputation: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
Tornadoes do not form readily along the areas that are along the foothills of the Rockies, so these hazards are very rare. It is when you get further out into the plains when they become more common.The City Propers of Loveland and Fort Collins ar tucked right against the Foothills.

In over 32 years, in the Denver area, I have rarely seen or heard of a tornado in and around the city and the western suburbs. The ones I can remember have been farther east, north and southeast in the suburbs--even that has been rare.

I do not know the relationship between an area that attracts retirees and the rise in property taxes. Why would it rise?? It could also fall, depending on many factors. If the retirees are fairly well off, would they then bring more taxes from their pensions and demand less of social services?? I do not know the answer.

The big issue in the rise of cost in the area of Fort Collins/Loveland is that it has got so much good media coverage and recommendations that more people have moved there; the demand for property has increased, property values have gone up. I assume the cities collect more taxes on this increase in value.

There so many issues looking for a place in retirement and sometimes

I think we look to broadly and think the whole area has to meet our needs. In reality, as you get older, you move around less and the importance of your neighborhood, your local supermarket, your local bus, local healthcare, the park, the library and the few miles around where you live is all that really matters.


I have lived in NYC and I have seen people who have lived in neighborhoods of that huge city their whole lives. Their neighborhood actually becomes their small "town". So, you can create a small living community of a "town" in even a large metropolitan areas. You get a feel for it when you watch, the TV show "Seinfeld". As you see they do much walking to local amenities--this is realistic in NYC.

I have found that some of these city neighborhoods have more of small town feel than authentic real small town. They have more walkable close areas, everthing is available in the neighborhood or a short bus/subway/rail distance away. Many small towns do not have good services and shopping, no public transit and the people have to drive a distance to healthcare and shopping; many times a Walmart, miles away.

Livecontent
I have come to realize the truth in this and am tailoring my own plans accordingly. Thank you for your comments Livecontent.
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