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Old 05-27-2011, 08:10 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,622 posts, read 39,986,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by circlearts1 View Post
I really like this forum - it sounds like what I am going through as a single "baby boomer," and not knowing exactly where to land. I've lived in Boulder CO - ... The 'founder' of this thread was once a Boulder resident and has considered returning. I spent considerable time in 'the-hill' area during my impressionable age
Also, I am considering someone in Europe,
If I can get some $$ working for me, I too will be in Europe (and Asia) renting a small flat in a small town with access to a 'hub' city
Quote:
Originally Posted by loveautumn View Post
Asheville is a very expensive place to live now that it's been "discovered".
check in with this group, they have some connections in the area Women for Living in Community

Quote:
Originally Posted by loveautumn View Post
I'm having a hard time choosing what area to retire because I feel torn about "lifestyles". ... (scenario #1). ...(scenario #2). Does it make sense to do scenario #1 say from age 66-75 (at best) and then move again to a smaller location say from 75 to whenever. ...
Anybody have any thoughts or experience with this?
You are pretty accurate, but age/agility does vary per individual. GENERALLY I find it is good to transition to a comfortable place to age (in place) pre age 80. That gives you some time to get used to the area and your living qtrs before you suffer too much debilitating illness. (typically... YMMV). Thus I hope to have a 'community' of sorts designed and built by the time I get to 80.. (cottages to skilled care, w/ an outpatient rehab center to bring in some cash and fresh blood.). If I don't make it in time, I will transition to MSP and reside at 7500 York, or Becketwood. senior living, Becketwood Cooperative Home or for a more rural fare ---a homestead cooperative
Finding joy in co-op life - House & Home

If I get to build one of these joints, I hope to reduce the costs ~ 30% by cutting out the developer profits. Thus a place to age for less than $100k and $500 / month fees for utilities, property insurance, taxes, and 'reserves' (roof repair ...).

 
Old 05-27-2011, 08:20 AM
 
433 posts, read 992,314 times
Reputation: 389
Please let me know when you've built it, SR!
 
Old 05-27-2011, 09:15 AM
 
Location: New England
400 posts, read 647,478 times
Reputation: 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by loveautumn View Post
I'm having a hard time choosing what area to retire because I feel torn about "lifestyles". One part of me thinks it would be best to live in or around a larger city/suburb because of the "ammenities", more things to do and good health care facilities, etc., although these areas tend to be more expensive (scenario #1). Then another part of me says live in a somewhat smaller, quieter area (not rural) because the traffic will be less and it will be an easier life in alot of ways (scenario #2). Does it make sense to do scenario #1 say from age 66-75 (at best) and then move again to a smaller location say from 75 to whenever.
I've had similar thoughts, but in reverse. I was thinking of starting with scenario #2, the quiet life in a small area, first, and later move to an area with better health care, transportation and other services.

I'd be interested in hearing other's experiences.
 
Old 05-27-2011, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,985,208 times
Reputation: 15649
I have lived in a semi-rural area adjacent to a college town for many years. It is more like a bedroom community to that college town. Even though it only takes 10 minutes driving time to surrounding towns with amenities, I have felt very isolated here. On a winter night when I'm climbing the walls wanting to go to the movies or a library event, I will not venture out onto the roads to get there. On a warm spring summer fall evening I don't want to be driving back from an event on a two lane highway in the dark. I strongly advise that, unless you have a strong community in a rural or suburban place, you think twice b/c of this.

Now I am moving into a small college town that has a village with shops, movie theater, book store, and prof services. These are walkable from my new place. I deliberately jumped on this opp because I know that as I age I do NOT want to be driving far and some day I won't be driving at all.

So, whether it's small town, big town, or city, the main thing, imo, to consider is easy transportation and walkabout. As LiveContent has pointed out, you can get a small town feel in an inner city n'hood, if you can easily and safely walk it and it has public transport. Beyond that, being very close to a market, library, hospital, and doctors is next, along with a park. Any other amenity is frosting on the cake.
 
Old 05-27-2011, 11:45 AM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,552,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loveautumn View Post
I'm having a hard time choosing what area to retire because I feel torn about "lifestyles". One part of me thinks it would be best to live in or around a larger city/suburb because of the "ammenities", more things to do and good health care facilities, etc., although these areas tend to be more expensive (scenario #1). Then another part of me says live in a somewhat smaller, quieter area (not rural) because the traffic will be less and it will be an easier life in alot of ways (scenario #2). Does it make sense to do scenario #1 say from age 66-75 (at best) and then move again to a smaller location say from 75 to whenever.

I really was convinced that scenario #1 was the best option when I retire, but I had a minor fender bender a few weeks ago and that kind of freaked me out about driving here and there when I'm older. I live where there is ALOT of traffic. I'm a good driver, 1st accident in 16 years, but it did make me think a bit about getting around in my later years.

Most of the older people I know say they love living in this larger, more populated area, but then when I really think about it, they don't venture much outside of our own suburb...so is there really much advantage to it?

Anybody have any thoughts or experience with this?
I do not think it is good idea to relocate again, after age 75, when you have already picked a spot for retirement at age 66. You will lose the advantages that you gain from the familiarity of "Sense of Place".

Sense of Place means that you are comfortable with all the amenities of your living environment. I believe familarity of the streets, the stores, the public transit, the parks and the health care services are very important to well being as you get older. If you move, again, after age 75, it would be very hard to establish a comfortable environment because it takes time; and as you age it is more difficult to adapt.

Many people stay in the same area, their whole lives, because that Sense of Place is much more important to them than job advancement, better weather and other advantages of relocating. People do not always stay in the same town, but they relocate to an another town in the area because they still have some comfortable familiarity with the Place.

People who live in a large metro area, as you cited, that do not leave their suburbs, still have the advantage of the big city support. A small town is not always a strict definition of place but can be a local neighborhood that defines their "own" town. I lived in New York City and many residents have more of a little town Sense of Place, in their neighborhoods, than what I saw in more remote areas.

That is exactly how I live. I do not venture too much out of my "little suburban town". My "little town" consist of parts of areas of different cities where I have the a mixture of suburban, semi-rural, and dense urban. Ocassionally, I have to venture out of my little enclave for more extensive medical support; yet it is very easy because all close and available with great public transit. However, I still very comfortable with those places because I am very familiar with the environment around hospitals and clinics.
 
Old 05-29-2011, 01:13 PM
 
433 posts, read 992,314 times
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As a woman relocating alone, there's one thing that I wonder about. When you're new in a community, what do you do if you need outpatient surgery or a test such as a colonoscopy that requires anesthetic? When I've had minor outpatient surgery, the hospital's policy was not to release a patient unless someone came to pick her up: taking a taxi home alone wasn't allowed, so I had to arrange for a friend to come to the hospital and drive me home. I'm talking about very minor surgery here, where the very slight anesthetic had worn off and I was perfectly able to take care of myself.

I hate to ask friends to take off work, drive through traffic to the hospital and drive me home and in a new place there'd be no one I knew well enough to do this for me anyway, so I'm wondering what others do. I wonder if there are, say, home health aids who could be hired for half a day.

This is one reason I'd like to live near other women in my situation. We could help others in small ways such as an escort home from the hospital.
 
Old 05-29-2011, 01:27 PM
 
11,192 posts, read 10,218,967 times
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Gosh, riverbird ... that would be a dilemma. Seeing how the hospital has that policy and they won't let you take a taxi home, perhaps one of their staff would like to volunteer to drive you home at the end of their shift. (I'm being facetious here). Some hospitals have a van service that transports patients. Inquire. They might have such a service. Just my two cents.

If I lived closer, I'd be happy to drive you.
 
Old 05-29-2011, 03:21 PM
 
433 posts, read 992,314 times
Reputation: 389
Thanks! That's kind of you, although I wouldn't expect anyone to come all the way from Mars. ;-)

I have no immediate need to be driven home. I'm just wondering what other single people do in such situations where they're new in town. Asking for help to get home from a colonoscopy isn't something one would say to a casual acquaintance!
 
Old 05-29-2011, 03:26 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,552,001 times
Reputation: 6928
Quote:
Originally Posted by riverbird View Post
As a woman relocating alone, there's one thing that I wonder about. When you're new in a community, what do you do if you need outpatient surgery or a test such as a colonoscopy that requires anesthetic? When I've had minor outpatient surgery, the hospital's policy was not to release a patient unless someone came to pick her up: taking a taxi home alone wasn't allowed, so I had to arrange for a friend to come to the hospital and drive me home. I'm talking about very minor surgery here, where the very slight anesthetic had worn off and I was perfectly able to take care of myself.

I hate to ask friends to take off work, drive through traffic to the hospital and drive me home and in a new place there'd be no one I knew well enough to do this for me anyway, so I'm wondering what others do. I wonder if there are, say, home health aids who could be hired for half a day.

This is one reason I'd like to live near other women in my situation. We could help others in small ways such as an escort home from the hospital.
There are many home healthcare agency that you can contract with by the hour. The best policy is to find one well before the need and then they will be ready to respond quicker. There are also social service agencies that provide this service--again check before the issue.

Or put a local christian church to the test and call them. I would be very surprised if you would be left wanting. That is one of the big reasons that many people belong to churches for soclal support, not so much for the stated reason of the beliefs (many will not admit it). As an atheist, I go to church functions ocassionally just for mostly the food; sometimes the fun and I do not object to a little fellowship, as long as they feed me--so far the gods have not shown their faces to object.

Livecontent
 
Old 05-29-2011, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,985,208 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by 46Barb View Post
I tried to send you a dm about areas to move to, but you're blocking dm's. Can you send me a dm about the areas? Thank you. Barb
Did you get my DM about some NE areas? Hope it was helpful
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