U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 08-03-2011, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Scotland(Robert Burns Country)
62 posts, read 88,054 times
Reputation: 83

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by karcon View Post
Flying Scott: First, hello. Haven't posted in quite some time but always "check in" to see how everyone is doing and how many newbies there are. I fully understand your dilemma. I was sort of adrift for a long time and when it was time to make the move my choices were leaving where I am for a whole new location/state or buy my first house in many, many years. I was looking at both and ended up buying my perfect townhome. Good choice but now two years later, as life has it, now thinking of the "future." My kids could not be further apart - son in Oakland, CA and daughter in Annapolis, MD. If you placed a ruler on a map they are directly opposite of each other. And me? I'm in FL. And where I am is really becoming a cultural and intellectual desert. Not that I am unhappy here - just miss my kids. And my son is ready to pack up the moving truck and move me out to CA. And my daughter thinks I could move to MD. So am now looking ahead, again. I would love to move to northern CA but it is so cost prohibitive. And I love the Annapolis/Baltimore area - so close to DC and NYC - and the water. And, P.S. my mother is from Scotland (Renfrew)!
My goodness Renfrew is not far from my hometown of Ayr. My daughter and grandson are now in Sacramento but she ws born in Walnut Creek not far from Oakland--it is a small word isnt it. I guess as I am getting older the heartstrings are tugging more-I dont know how my mother did it not being there to see her only grandchild grow up-my little grandson is 3 now and growing like a weed and I hate missing all of that and now that my mother is gone I only have 2 cousins here in the UK so no real pull of family to stay here except it has been nice being back home after more than 35 years in the states.
I love the retirement ideas I get from the many posters on this forum about places they have chosen now if I could just clone myself I could be in all my favorite places at once

 
Old 08-03-2011, 12:35 PM
 
4,571 posts, read 7,054,651 times
Reputation: 4217
Colorado...seems to be the "hot" area to move to right now! But I did read on the Colorado forum that some seniors cannot adapt to the high altitude (nosebleeds, light-headedness, shortness of breath, etc.). I know it supposedly takes a few weeks but some never can adjust. I guess one wouldn't really know unless they visited there for at least a few weeks to see how it goes. Just something to consider...I have considered Denver myself but kind of like being at sea level.
 
Old 08-03-2011, 02:39 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,542,042 times
Reputation: 6928
Quote:
Originally Posted by loveautumn View Post
Colorado...seems to be the "hot" area to move to right now! But I did read on the Colorado forum that some seniors cannot adapt to the high altitude (nosebleeds, light-headedness, shortness of breath, etc.). I know it supposedly takes a few weeks but some never can adjust. I guess one wouldn't really know unless they visited there for at least a few weeks to see how it goes. Just something to consider...I have considered Denver myself but kind of like being at sea level.
Altitude problems are not a major issue for seniors living in the Denver area. I rarely hear complaints from seniors living here. It is when some seniors go to higher elevations that they may experience problems but it is also a problem with some younger people. We are talking about altitudes over 8200 ft. and the Denver metro area is around 5200 feet. Vail and Aspen are about 8000 ft. and some people have problems. Well over 8200 ft, at higher altitudes, there could be more serious problems but seniors and others, with medical problems, are not going to that altitude.

It depends on your health. Many people who grew up here or who have lived here for many years, have been conditioned and acclimated to tolerate the higher elevations than Denver.

Some people can have initial minor problems in Denver but can be acclimated over a short time. Yes, some people with more severe health problems cannot acclimate to Denver but I have not have had contact with any.

Keep in mind that Denver was settled by many people over the last Century who had lung problems, especially from consumption (TB), and the high altitude dry cool air was considered a good remedy for those medical problems.

Nosebleeds are more a problem caused by the dry air and can be remediated with humidifiers, nasal sprays. ENT Physicians have told me to use personal lubricants like the namebrand, KY, which is water based. People do, over time, are able to more tolerate dry air.

That is according to my experiences; other people have other experiences and opinions. My parents, siblings, and I have lived here for decades and never experienced any problems.

Livecontent
 
Old 08-03-2011, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Madison, WI
230 posts, read 350,919 times
Reputation: 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by AcaciaRose View Post
Not to mention the stress of calling around to find someone who would do the work and the anxiety of having no one to call at 2am when all my electrically connected smoke alarms went off for no reason. I'm so glad to be renting again.

There's no one answer. It's different for everyone.
I had a pilot light out once and it was cold and I was afraid to light it... never learned how to do it. Just goes to show that we need to teach our daughters to fish. My dad always laughed at me and did the chores around the house for me. He was sure I'd be married forever. Ha!

Might be an idea for a women's groups, everyone has some specialty... they could teach, or just having someone to call at 2 in the morning when something is going wrong would be good enough for me sometimes!
 
Old 08-04-2011, 07:20 AM
 
433 posts, read 991,525 times
Reputation: 389
A group where everyone has some specialty would be great! I could be the IT support person.

The smoke alarm thing was probably my lowest point in that house. I was new in town so had no friends and didn't want to call a nephew or neighbor in the middle of the night. Ten below zero outside, 2AM, and all the detectors were screaming. I had changed all of the batteries a month before, so I knew it wasn't that. I didn't know that in a connected system when one sounds, they all sound, even for false alarms.

Finally I carried a step stool to every story of the house, climbed up, and unplugged each of the detectors to stop their earsplitting sound. The next morning I called an alarm company and arranged to have them all replaced with combination smoke/carbon monoxide detectors. Turns out smoke detectors have a life of ten or fewer years, and these had probably been there since the home was built in the mid-nineties. The incident was scary and costly but not all bad. I was able to use the new system as a selling point when I listed the house.
 
Old 08-04-2011, 09:12 AM
 
1,569 posts, read 3,084,450 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by AcaciaRose View Post
A group where everyone has some specialty would be great! I could be the IT support person.

The smoke alarm thing was probably my lowest point in that house. I was new in town so had no friends and didn't want to call a nephew or neighbor in the middle of the night. Ten below zero outside, 2AM, and all the detectors were screaming. I had changed all of the batteries a month before, so I knew it wasn't that. I didn't know that in a connected system when one sounds, they all sound, even for false alarms.

Finally I carried a step stool to every story of the house, climbed up, and unplugged each of the detectors to stop their earsplitting sound. The next morning I called an alarm company and arranged to have them all replaced with combination smoke/carbon monoxide detectors. Turns out smoke detectors have a life of ten or fewer years, and these had probably been there since the home was built in the mid-nineties. The incident was scary and costly but not all bad. I was able to use the new system as a selling point when I listed the house.
I worry about those things too. I have a smoke detector at the top of the living room ceiling which is probably 15 feet up. There's no way I could reach it. Come to think of it my son is in town so I should borrow a taller ladder and ask him to change the battery. He climbs mountains so that should be no problem.

I'm fortunate to have a friend a block away who has helped out. One night I locked myself out because the lock on the door slips easily back to lock and I was in a hurry to quickly do something in the yard before it got dark and it locked. I use to hide a key outside but I either hide it so well I couldn't find it or I just forgot to put it back. It was getting dark so even more difficult. I did feel sticky webs which usually means black widows (UGH!) My neighbor lost the key I had given her but fortunately she drove me to the college where another friend who had a key was still working in the studio. Now I have a lockbox outside with an extra key--worth the expense and I don't worry about someone else finding the key.

I'll be the potter. I've gotten fairly good at anchoring things in walls.
 
Old 08-04-2011, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,954 posts, read 7,388,974 times
Reputation: 16278
I feel like the "jack of all trades and master of none" - which means, I figure out how to do whatever needs getting done.
 
Old 08-04-2011, 11:02 AM
 
4,571 posts, read 7,054,651 times
Reputation: 4217
thanks for your input Livecontent on the elevation and dry air issues...it was very helpful.
 
Old 08-04-2011, 11:40 AM
 
1,569 posts, read 3,084,450 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Umbria View Post
I feel like the "jack of all trades and master of none" - which means, I figure out how to do whatever needs getting done.
When it comes to minor house maintenance that's me. Although I don't like house maintenance I give it a try and get it done when necessary (except for heights, plumbing, electricity.) hmmmm..what's that leave? I'll paint walls even though I don't like it and hang things like curtain rods and make the curtains. I can change light bulbs. When my builder said I should get on the flat roof and shovel the snow off I just laughed. Yeah right.

I'm not sure I want to attempt the drywall in the ceiling that needs to be replaced even though I know I could do it and if I had more time I would. Since it's in my studio I don't even notice it because I'm focused on my pots when I walk in there. When a friend walks in it is the first thing they notice. I have a name of a handyman I'll try.

I garden, sew, and cook too. But not so much since I started playing with clay. I like archery but don't think it would contribute anything to the pot.

Kidding aside, it is always easier to get a project done if a friend is helping. I knew someone in Iowa who formed a group that would trade help and keep track of time. I saw something like that here but never checked into it further.
 
Old 08-04-2011, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Washington County, ME
1,549 posts, read 2,387,596 times
Reputation: 1873
I can do small things around my house - even changed a doorknob/lock combo on an indoor door

But i'm talking more major things, like electrical, plumbing, roof, septic, water well... these things are costly to have repaired. AND it's time for my fireplace and chimney to be cleaned again.

I love my house and my land, it just gets to be pretty sad when every day i have to worry about how i'm gonna pay my taxes.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top