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Old 10-28-2012, 01:14 PM
 
5,706 posts, read 8,771,469 times
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I think you need to visit in July or August to judge the humidity. I don't consider any place in TN to be low humidity - especially in the summer.

I don't have much personal knowledge of Kingsport.

 
Old 10-29-2012, 06:03 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
1,362 posts, read 3,808,006 times
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Creeksitter, I think the humidity in TN all depends on where you are moving from. I used to live on Long Island & then some time in CT. The humidity here in TN is much less and doesn't bother me like it did when I lived in the northeast. My neighbor is from FL and doesn't feel it at all. I have a friend who moved here from California and didn't have humidity until moving here & feels it.
 
Old 11-10-2012, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Tucson, az
5 posts, read 8,562 times
Reputation: 15
I know how miserable I am during the Arizona monsoons that last only a few weeks! When you are not used to living in the humid rain forest type places it really hits you when you get there! Went from MT to visit BC and thought I was gonna melt! Went to FL in the summer and thought the same! I think I will stick to southeastern Arizona!
 
Old 11-10-2012, 03:20 PM
 
Location: SW US
2,222 posts, read 2,038,982 times
Reputation: 3834
I'm having big problems with dry skin in the Arizona climate now that I'm older, so I think that means I need slightly more humidity, although certainly not Florida levels. I'm not sure where the middle ground is.
 
Old 11-11-2012, 06:50 AM
 
1,569 posts, read 3,086,739 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Windwalker2 View Post
I'm having big problems with dry skin in the Arizona climate now that I'm older, so I think that means I need slightly more humidity, although certainly not Florida levels. I'm not sure where the middle ground is.
The Pacific NW was great for my skin without the oppressive humidity. I was surprised since it rains so much but it felt much different than the east coast humidity.
 
Old 11-11-2012, 11:49 AM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,242,460 times
Reputation: 14870
Quote:
Originally Posted by Windwalker2 View Post
I'm having big problems with dry skin in the Arizona climate now that I'm older, so I think that means I need slightly more humidity, although certainly not Florida levels. I'm not sure where the middle ground is.
A portable humidifier for winter.

And a swamp cooler (AKA evaporative cooler) for summer. Your wallet will also thank you with the lower utility bills
 
Old 11-11-2012, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,754,097 times
Reputation: 32309
Default Swamp coolers, humidity, and what we are used to

With apologies for a male butting in, I wanted to point out that the more humid the climate, the less effective swamp coolers are because they rely on evaporative cooling. In dry, desert climates they do indeed save money and do a good job. There is a reason, however, that they are not found in areas of high humidity.

Previous posters who pointed out that what we are used to plays an important role in what we can tolerate are correct, in my opinion. I lived three years in Baton Rouge, Louisiana when I was 18 to 21 years old, while attending Lousiana State University from 1962 to 1965. My dorm room had no air conditioning and we relied on electric fans; nowdays, of course, there is no such thing as dorm rooms without air conditioning. In 2005 I returned to Baton Rouge for a visit in July and was helping a cousin load some furniture onto a trailer. We did not have a whole lot of furniture to move, but I thought I was going to pass out! It was miserable beyond description. I was no longer used to that sort of humidity.
 
Old 11-11-2012, 07:10 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,647 posts, read 40,010,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
...Previous posters who pointed out that what we are used to plays an important role in what we can tolerate are correct, in my opinion. I lived three years in Baton Rouge, Louisiana when I was 18 to 21 years old, ...In 2005 I returned to Baton Rouge for a visit in July ... It was miserable beyond description. I was no longer used to that sort of humidity.
I make it a point to never venture east of Missouri River May - Sept.

I was miserable at age 10 and 18, when I did DC and NC.

I find there is NOW some additonal issues I attribute to increased BMI Maybe a 'sweat bath' would help...
 
Old 11-12-2012, 12:35 PM
 
1,569 posts, read 3,086,739 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
I make it a point to never venture east of Missouri River May - Sept.

I was miserable at age 10 and 18, when I did DC and NC.

I find there is NOW some additonal issues I attribute to increased BMI Maybe a 'sweat bath' would help...

Won't help. I did a sweat lodge and it was interesting but once was enough.

I only go east in the summer because my grandkids have more time to spend with me.

It is what you get use to and what you like to do. I lived in PA without air conditioning when I was young but wouldn't do it now. If you like being outside it's better to live in an environment where you'll want to go out. Right now I'm having to adjust to the cold - it's been so warm this fall it's a shock - seems like we went from 60-70s to 20. brrr....
 
Old 11-12-2012, 03:03 PM
 
Location: SW US
2,222 posts, read 2,038,982 times
Reputation: 3834
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dancingearth View Post

It is what you get use to and what you like to do. I lived in PA without air conditioning when I was young but wouldn't do it now. If you like being outside it's better to live in an environment where you'll want to go out. Right now I'm having to adjust to the cold - it's been so warm this fall it's a shock - seems like we went from 60-70s to 20. brrr....

A few days ago, trying to explain to a friend in south Texas why I could never stand living in her climate, I came to realize that she never does outdoor stuff and stays in AC when it's hot. I, OTOH, am outdoors all year, so it's better to find a climate that better suits me.

We went from a high of 90 to a high in the 50's in the blink of an eye at the end of last week. Hard to adjust so fast!
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