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Old 02-28-2013, 04:50 PM
 
2,628 posts, read 4,964,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loveautumn View Post
Portion of an article I ran across from AARP...


"Chances are, you will be hearing more about pocket neighborhoods. This increasingly popular housing option generally consists of a dozen or so compact houses or apartments that share common or green space. That might be a pedestrian walkway, garden, courtyard or shared backyard or alley. Central mailboxes give neighbors even more opportunities to interact.
Backyards are typically small, with the focus on the front especially those porches. Usually, pocket homes have an open floor plan and are newly constructed, but could also be in an existing enclave. Regardless, they are tucked into "pockets" of a neighborhood or part of a larger new development, often near walkable destinations like shops and restaurants.
Parking, you ask? Pockets may have a separate parking area or attached garages, but they deemphasize the automobile mentality, where drivers pull into garages and disappear into houses until it's time to hop back into the car. Instead, the architecture emphasizes forming relationships with neighbors."





One of the women interviewed was living in one of these in Carmel Indiana. Just like what some of us are looking for!
This sounds very interesting! I am going to check it out!

 
Old 02-28-2013, 04:57 PM
 
2,628 posts, read 4,964,089 times
Reputation: 2225
Here is a link to a video about a new pocket neighborhood in Carmel. Way too pricey for me!


Pocket Neighborhoods in Carmel, IN - YouTube
 
Old 02-28-2013, 05:15 PM
 
2,628 posts, read 4,964,089 times
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I am planning another road trip this spring and will visit my hometown (Lafayette, IN) for the first time since 1979! I am still considering moving back there when I retire. I miss the four seasons, want less traffic, want to live in a safer area and by being in the midwest, it is easier to drive to many other places in the U.S. Currently, it takes me all day to drive out of Florida just to go anywhere out of state! I will be 62 next month and need to get serious about investigating places to live. I will also visit the area around the Smokies, Lexington, KY.... We shall see!
 
Old 02-28-2013, 05:46 PM
 
1,581 posts, read 2,209,515 times
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popcorn247: I'm very interested in hearing how your trip goes and your impression. I'm still a few years from retirement, but have checked out Knoxville and the Tri-Cities, in addition to Nashville, and also thinking of looking more into the smaller suburbs around Indianapolis. Would be nice to be situated a little further east of Iowa for travel in later years (I've already spent a lot of time in the western states).

Enjoy your trip and best wishes!
 
Old 02-28-2013, 07:00 PM
 
32 posts, read 46,252 times
Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by loveautumn View Post
"Chances are, you will be hearing more about pocket neighborhoods. This increasingly popular housing option generally consists of a dozen or so compact houses or apartments that share common or green space. That might be a pedestrian walkway, garden, courtyard or shared backyard or alley. Central mailboxes give neighbors even more opportunities to interact.
Backyards are typically small, with the focus on the front especially those porches. Usually, pocket homes have an open floor plan and are newly constructed, but could also be in an existing enclave. Regardless, they are tucked into "pockets" of a neighborhood or part of a larger new development, often near walkable destinations like shops and restaurants.
Parking, you ask? Pockets may have a separate parking area or attached garages, but they deemphasize the automobile mentality, where drivers pull into garages and disappear into houses until it's time to hop back into the car. Instead, the architecture emphasizes forming relationships with neighbors."
I like the idea of more emphasis on the front of the homes. It's easier yo get to know your neighbors when you can see them on a front porch. Add in the walkability factor and these have potential to be great neighborhoods. Too many homes these days have the emphasis on the rear of the house— resulting in neighbors that rarely see each other.
 
Old 02-28-2013, 07:04 PM
 
32 posts, read 46,252 times
Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by popcorn247 View Post
I am planning another road trip this spring and will visit my hometown (Lafayette, IN) for the first time since 1979! I am still considering moving back there when I retire.
Just curious popcorn247, why haven't you been back to your hometown since '79? Also, are you still in touch with many people from your hometown?
 
Old 03-01-2013, 08:11 AM
 
1,569 posts, read 3,089,312 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by loveautumn View Post
Portion of an article I ran across from AARP...


"Chances are, you will be hearing more about pocket neighborhoods. This increasingly popular housing option generally consists of a dozen or so compact houses or apartments that share common or green space. That might be a pedestrian walkway, garden, courtyard or shared backyard or alley. Central mailboxes give neighbors even more opportunities to interact.
Backyards are typically small, with the focus on the front especially those porches. Usually, pocket homes have an open floor plan and are newly constructed, but could also be in an existing enclave. Regardless, they are tucked into "pockets" of a neighborhood or part of a larger new development, often near walkable destinations like shops and restaurants.
Parking, you ask? Pockets may have a separate parking area or attached garages, but they deemphasize the automobile mentality, where drivers pull into garages and disappear into houses until it's time to hop back into the car. Instead, the architecture emphasizes forming relationships with neighbors."

One of the women interviewed was living in one of these in Carmel Indiana. Just like what some of us are looking for!
Iīd like to see this more. Seems like most new neighborhoods are a street of garages. I miss having a front porch although I would still want a private backyard for when I donīt want to interact but want to be outside. I have a central mailbox a 2 minute walk away (at the most) at the end of the cul de sac and I have seen my neighbor drive his car to it! Itīs not because he was incapable of walking. Talk about car mentality. It hasn't created community in my neighborhood but I like that it's locked.
 
Old 03-01-2013, 11:14 AM
 
32 posts, read 46,252 times
Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dancingearth View Post
Iīd like to see this more. Seems like most new neighborhoods are a street of garages. I miss having a front porch although I would still want a private backyard for when I donīt want to interact but want to be outside. I have a central mailbox a 2 minute walk away (at the most) at the end of the cul de sac and I have seen my neighbor drive his car to it! Itīs not because he was incapable of walking. Talk about car mentality. It hasn't created community in my neighborhood but I like that it's locked.

LOL, I can relate, I've got neighbors that drive to the coffee shop that's 2 blocks away. And I assume spend time finding a place to park.
 
Old 03-01-2013, 11:27 AM
 
4,576 posts, read 7,076,737 times
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lagal, what did you think of Nashville and Knoxville?

I know Carmel, IN is one of the more expensive suburbs of Indy, so I'm not surprised these types of developments are pricey, but at least developers are thinking in the right direction. I know Indiana is not the most "retiree" friendly when it comes to taxes. But it is a good compromise in many ways between the Northeast and going South.
 
Old 03-01-2013, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,017,552 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by popcorn247 View Post
Here is a link to a video about a new pocket neighborhood in Carmel. Way too pricey for me!


Pocket Neighborhoods in Carmel, IN - YouTube
Oooh, i can see some problems here....dogs barking, teenagers with their basketballs and coming in late at night revving their cars, family arguments, etc....I have a close neighbor on either side and with young adults on one side and kids on another, I can attest to these challenges. And...do we really want to connect with people who may be nothing at all like us? What if they put political signs on their lawns that you don't agree with, or if they shun you because you don't belong to what they do? Just some considerations... It's actually, imo, less "personal" to live in a condo or apt.

Now, if pocket n'hoods like this were strictly 55+, I'd consider it. The HOA fees need to be checked out.
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