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Old 03-10-2013, 02:00 PM
 
14 posts, read 18,958 times
Reputation: 16

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Quote:
Originally Posted by loveautumn View Post
Portion of an article I ran across from AARP...


"Chances are, you will be hearing more about pocket neighborhoods. This increasingly popular housing option generally consists of a dozen or so compact houses or apartments that share common or green space. That might be a pedestrian walkway, garden, courtyard or shared backyard or alley. Central mailboxes give neighbors even more opportunities to interact.
Backyards are typically small, with the focus on the front especially those porches. Usually, pocket homes have an open floor plan and are newly constructed, but could also be in an existing enclave. Regardless, they are tucked into "pockets" of a neighborhood or part of a larger new development, often near walkable destinations like shops and restaurants.
Parking, you ask? Pockets may have a separate parking area or attached garages, but they deemphasize the automobile mentality, where drivers pull into garages and disappear into houses until it's time to hop back into the car. Instead, the architecture emphasizes forming relationships with neighbors."




One of the women interviewed was living in one of these in Carmel Indiana. Just like what some of us are looking for!
I looked it up and found a book Pocket Neighborhoods ? Creating Small Scale Community in a Large Scale World
also on facebook
https://www.facebook.com/TheCottageCompany
and cohousing
I am discovering this better approach to living.. Lots of information out there... so one needs to become educated. Ross Chapin is one name you need to keep in mind. He is on Facebook
What Is Cohousing? | The Cohousing Association of the United States
.........and the search goes on. ciao

 
Old 03-10-2013, 02:35 PM
 
966 posts, read 918,839 times
Reputation: 1890
I looked at some of the information listed..... While not qualified completely to be called "cohousing", I have looked at condos in Sun City, Az that are linked units arranged around a central courtyard with garages in the rear and tiny private backyards. I love the concept....many are close to a community center or shopping/churches and some are even affordable for someone on a low end budget like me! I haven't had a chance to talk to anyone who lives in the courtyard units, but seems "cozy" to me and preferable to a busy street. I'm still trying to find one that I both like and can afford!
 
Old 03-10-2013, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,969,510 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by dalidali View Post
I looked it up and found a book Pocket Neighborhoods ? Creating Small Scale Community in a Large Scale World
also on facebook
https://www.facebook.com/TheCottageCompany
and cohousing
I am discovering this better approach to living.. Lots of information out there... so one needs to become educated. Ross Chapin is one name you need to keep in mind. He is on Facebook
What Is Cohousing? | The Cohousing Association of the United States
.........and the search goes on. ciao
The houses on either side of me where I live now (in a regular n'hood) are quite close. I can tell you that anyone who is noise-sensitive will not want to live in a pocket community with houses as close as those shown on the Cottage Company website, especially in mixed housing. You will have an echo rebound of dogs barking, basketballs wapped against tar at all hours, arguments wafting through windows, clarinet and piano practices, teens coming and going at all hours (imagine that at midnight or later), kids or grandkids splashing and screaming in pools under your home office window, etc etc. If you are chemical sensitive, and you walk your dog on your street, will you want the chemlawn truck arriving next door? Will you want your next door neighbor spraying his garden with pesticides if you are trying to grow a little organic garden? These are the types of things to think about when thinking about neat 'concepts' like pocket neighborhoods.
 
Old 03-13-2013, 08:28 AM
 
15,189 posts, read 31,132,279 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
The houses on either side of me where I live now (in a regular n'hood) are quite close. I can tell you that anyone who is noise-sensitive will not want to live in a pocket community with houses as close as those shown on the Cottage Company website, especially in mixed housing. You will have an echo rebound of dogs barking, basketballs wapped against tar at all hours, arguments wafting through windows, clarinet and piano practices, teens coming and going at all hours (imagine that at midnight or later), kids or grandkids splashing and screaming in pools under your home office window, etc etc. If you are chemical sensitive, and you walk your dog on your street, will you want the chemlawn truck arriving next door? Will you want your next door neighbor spraying his garden with pesticides if you are trying to grow a little organic garden? These are the types of things to think about when thinking about neat 'concepts' like pocket neighborhoods.
LOL - THANK YOU for this! Every once in awhile it's good to have a reminder of why I love my home so much. I am only 63 now (hubby a bit younger, still working) but I think I could stay here even if I were alone. House itself is pretty low maintenance, but I do have a larger yard that I am trying to eliminate the "grass" (or what passes for grass in sandy Florida, lol). But I can always hire someone to take care of it if the day comes I am not able. I don't think I could ever live in a place whether tiny home or condo, or what-have-you where I had to share walls with neighbors, etc. I have lived like that when I was younger and I HATED IT! In fact, I lived in one "urban" neighborhood where houses were very close and I don't think I slept one single night through for the 12 years I lived there. Never again! You raised some excellent points for those here to consider.
 
Old 03-13-2013, 05:38 PM
 
Location: SoCal
6,063 posts, read 9,524,350 times
Reputation: 5789
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Mud foyers are typical in old rural New England farmhouses, it's where the farmers came in to doff their boots and outer clothing muddied from the fields and local roads. I don't think the average retiree needs a mud foyer, unless you're out in the boondocks.
All the houses in my neighborhood in Chicago had mud foyers, at both back and front doors. Not necessarily entire rooms, but enough space to easily take off wet shoes and clothes without tracking it into the house.
 
Old 03-13-2013, 06:02 PM
 
1,915 posts, read 4,605,233 times
Reputation: 1350
Default Moving north to south or east to west, or the reverse

I love this thread and read it often, though I don't always post. Getting back to the original topic of "women retiring alone to a new city/state," I wonder if anyone (a solo female) has made a move to a different part of the country for retirement. For example, from the north to the south, or from the east to the midwest or west, or any of these in reverse. I'm thinking about the big climate changes, different political vibes, etc., in addition to meeting new people. Cost of living is often mentioned as an important variable, but adjusting to a completely different part of the country is challenging. Has anyone done it? Or thinking about doing it?
 
Old 03-13-2013, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Sarasota Florida
1,236 posts, read 3,607,366 times
Reputation: 1230
Quote:
Originally Posted by xz2y View Post
I love this thread and read it often, though I don't always post. Getting back to the original topic of "women retiring alone to a new city/state," I wonder if anyone (a solo female) has made a move to a different part of the country for retirement. For example, from the north to the south, or from the east to the midwest or west, or any of these in reverse. I'm thinking about the big climate changes, different political vibes, etc., in addition to meeting new people. Cost of living is often mentioned as an important variable, but adjusting to a completely different part of the country is challenging. Has anyone done it? Or thinking about doing it?
I made the coast to coast move in 2001 from FL to OR but had a b/f then. He passed away two years ago and I'm serious about relocating back to FL but this time alone At my age this is daunting Then there's the complication of selling my OR country home at a tremendous financial LO$$ yes, daunting to say the least !
 
Old 03-13-2013, 08:24 PM
 
1,915 posts, read 4,605,233 times
Reputation: 1350
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConeyIsBabe View Post
I made the coast to coast move in 2001 from FL to OR but had a b/f then. He passed away two years ago and I'm serious about relocating back to FL but this time alone At my age this is daunting Then there's the complication of selling my OR country home at a tremendous financial LO$$ yes, daunting to say the least !
Why are you thinking of FL again? More sun than OR? Yes, a cross country move solo is very daunting. My strategy would be to sell as much as possible given the cost of moving stuff that distance. I'm moving this summer (location not determined yet), and will be selling everything except a few books, some clothes, my art supplies, computer & small household items of value.

Instead of renting a truck or a moving pod (very expensive), I will ship everything in small-medium boxes via FedEx ground. Better rates than UPS or the post office, and they have a home delivery option where boxes can be delivered to a residence on a certain day and time for a small fee for the whole shipment. I'll have to purchase some furniture when I get to my new place, but it's better than spending $$ on shipping stuff that can be replaced for less $$ than the cost of moving it. If you have family heirloom furniture, it may be a different story, but for me, going lighter is good.
 
Old 03-14-2013, 09:30 AM
 
32 posts, read 46,121 times
Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by xz2y View Post
I will ship everything in small-medium boxes via FedEx ground. Better rates than UPS or the post office, and they have a home delivery option where boxes can be delivered to a residence on a certain day and time for a small fee for the whole shipment.
Good to know, thanks for posting this.
 
Old 03-14-2013, 07:52 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
25 posts, read 26,835 times
Reputation: 60
I have moved from North to Mid-South (NC) and I have not regretted my decision once. I am a divorcee, so I originally knew absolutely no one when I moved here and only had a minimum wage job. There are challenges no matter where you move. You really need to make a list of 'deal breakers' first and stick by them.

If you have any questions for me, I would be happy to answer them. As soon as my blog, Women's Radical Retirement, is completed, I would be more than happy to notifiy you that it is fully functional (just learning how to do web design...Yikes! Didn't realize it would be so complex. So it is slow learning curve for this older gal.)

I wish you a lot of luck finding your final home. I did a lot of research for over 10 years to make the best decision. That is why I want to do the website so others don't have to take that long to make an informed decision.

Tondra
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