U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 07-13-2013, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Nowhere near Chicago
437 posts, read 556,005 times
Reputation: 385

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
I guess we're lucky, and shrewd because we did check things before we bought for our retirement home. I personally have always hated HOAs and resulting fees fees finding them intrusive and outrageous in many instances and the latter always subject to increases. We chose a single family hose in a small (213 houses), lakeside community of nothing but custom SFDs. The community owns and maintains all the streets, provides street clearance during the rare snowfall that requires it, maintains unsold lots, has a lighted helipad for medical evacuation if needed (we're quite rural - been used once in the four years we've lived here) and provides a community center and very nice pool. For all this there is an HOA annual assessment of a walloping $205 a year. That's stayed steady for at least 20 years and I find it a small price to pay for all we get which includes shared ownership of the 19 lots dedicated to association maintenance, the community center, pool, helipad, et all. Best of all, the HOA keeps hands off of and out of our business. Thankfully, the vast predominance of the people who live here - I'd say 98% - take real pride in their homes and good care of their lots which range from a quarter acre to 3/4.

Now that's my idea of a reasonable HOA.
Indeed! And I looked into the Ozarks, after reading a few more of your posts, and for ME, unfortunately, it's out of my price range. Had life worked out differently for me, health-wise and otherwise, I'd be in a different situation, and I am not alone. So many thought we were planning well, doing what we were supposed to, and then *WHAMMO!*

Such beautiful areas in the Ozarks. And for $205 to have so much taken care of for you? Wow.

And to earlyretirement.... I checked out your links. OMG is all I can say. You too have done well in life and are reaping the rewards. I wish that for all of us, and yet.........

What I can do is be so grateful for what I am ABLE to do/afford, and be happy for those who are doing so much better. That's life, folks.... it's all about attitude.



bullie~

 
Old 07-13-2013, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Miraflores
786 posts, read 895,355 times
Reputation: 1531
Being a single retiree, I had all the usual "retirement criteria" weather/medical dental care/QOL/COL/Good investment opportunity. Lot's of cities could have fit the bill, but most important was a large "dating pool" and a city with a young population. My top three choices were Santiago/Medellin/Lima. Most single guy's were going to Medellin back then and Santiago was a bit far so I chose Lima as it ticked almost all the boxes. 9 years later, I would never have imagined how fortunate I was.

Having retired at 33, I had to streeeeech my money for 60+ years, so spending $400.00 a week on dating was not an option over the LT and was pretty difficult to accomplish in Manhattan more than twice a week. Here in Lima, I could go on three dates a day and still spend less.

Fortunately, I met my 2nd Wife early on and now my "dating budget" is going to "milk/diapers/private schools/and family vacations.
 
Old 07-13-2013, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Santaluz - San Diego, CA
4,485 posts, read 8,149,853 times
Reputation: 1976
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
I guess we're lucky, and shrewd because we did check things before we bought for our retirement home. I personally have always hated HOAs and resulting fees fees finding them intrusive and outrageous in many instances and the latter always subject to increases. We chose a single family hose in a small (213 houses), lakeside community of nothing but custom SFDs. The community owns and maintains all the streets, provides street clearance during the rare snowfall that requires it, maintains unsold lots, has a lighted helipad for medical evacuation if needed (we're quite rural - been used once in the four years we've lived here) and provides a community center and very nice pool. For all this there is an HOA annual assessment of a walloping $205 a year. That's stayed steady for at least 20 years and I find it a small price to pay for all we get which includes shared ownership of the 19 lots dedicated to association maintenance, the community center, pool, helipad, et all. Best of all, the HOA keeps hands off of and out of our business. Thankfully, the vast predominance of the people who live here - I'd say 98% - take real pride in their homes and good care of their lots which range from a quarter acre to 3/4.

Now that's my idea of a reasonable HOA.
Curmudgeon,

$205 a YEAR is ABSOLUTELY wonderful! It sounds like there are some wonderful people in the community that respect the development and everyone does their part to make the community wonderful. That's awesome.

Can I ask what the median cost of houses are in your area for those that are interested? Thanks for that information.
 
Old 07-15-2013, 09:48 AM
 
Location: SoCal
6,074 posts, read 9,535,742 times
Reputation: 5817
Quote:
Originally Posted by earlyretirement View Post
...The best thing is to take a detailed look at the expense statement and also ask for past statements so you can evaluable what the HOA fees include. As well, several states have a law where they make it mandatory to make available the financial condition and financial statements each year to the owners. You should be able to see these as well to get a picture of how well it might be managed.....
And for anyone who does elect to buy in an HOA, the next best thing is to get a position on the board so you can have some say over how the place gets run.

And when you buy condo-owner's insurance, be sure that special assessments for repairs is covered under the policy.
 
Old 07-15-2013, 09:51 AM
 
1,569 posts, read 3,086,141 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullie62 View Post
GURRRRL....... I am amazed by you digging posts!! Even when I was in my early 40's, I had big, strong, shirtless men, lol, doing it for me. There was no way my post digging tool was gonna get through Chicago "dirt". ugh.... And now, at 51, disabled but not DOWN, I want to make sure when I can't do something, it's going to get done. Somehow. By someone. Other than me. lol

AND, I HOPE you ALL didn't read into my post that women cannot do for themselves. NOT what I said..... My thought is that there are some things a LOT of us haven't learned to do, had no one to show us, and MAYBE are in a space in time where strength or good eyesight or knowledge is needed, NOW.

Would be nice if everything could be done bit by bit. And that's not usually the case, when it's NEEDED. Gardening, taking up hobbies, learning new tasks, can be done at our own pace. Emergencies are what I'm speaking of....

I lift weights at home, when I'm not laid out with my disease. I'm not a weakling NOR an excuse maker. I am a realist. My dad never taught me nuffin', 'cause HE knew nuffin'. lol Ex hubby always hired someone. I have relied on my guy friends when not in a relationship. So NOW, I am a bit worried.

One proactive thing I've done is start a series of classes FOR WOMEN ONLY, about basic car upkeep and repair, basic plumbing emergencies, basic use of tools and what should be in everyone's tool box. And women are VERY excited about this. Too many of us haven't had the experience in any of these areas, and some have never thought it was necessary.

THAT is the point behind my post. Dancingearth, you are my hero. Kudos and bravo and a round of applause, STANDING UP!



bullie~
awwww.... No, I didn't take your original post as women couldn't do things that men can--it's just harder and I agree. As a woman I understand and get frustrated with all the things I don't know and can't afford to pay someone else to do. My Dad didn't teach me anything either--he just did it. I still want my Dad to come clean my car. I'm hoping that Time Bank might be an answer for getting help with what I can't or don't want to learn (especially small electrical things). Your classes sound like a great idea!
 
Old 07-15-2013, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Nowhere near Chicago
437 posts, read 556,005 times
Reputation: 385
Default Ask for info. ASK FOR INFO! ;)

Quote:
Originally Posted by oddstray View Post
And for anyone who does elect to buy in an HOA, the next best thing is to get a position on the board so you can have some say over how the place gets run.

And when you buy condo-owner's insurance, be sure that special assessments for repairs is covered under the policy.
Another awesome post with EXTREMELY helpful information, for those of us who have no experience in the matter. Much thanks!!


bullie~
 
Old 07-15-2013, 01:30 PM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,190 posts, read 2,858,918 times
Reputation: 4887
Quote:
Originally Posted by oddstray View Post
And for anyone who does elect to buy in an HOA, the next best thing is to get a position on the board so you can have some say over how the place gets run.

And when you buy condo-owner's insurance, be sure that special assessments for repairs is covered under the policy.
My parents moved to a condo with an HOA when they were in their 70's. Mom said it felt like living in an apartment that they didn't own - even tho they did.

It was a large 3000 sq. ft. unit - attached to another on one side.

She despised the board - and went on to become the Treasurer - and hated it even more.

After dad died she moved into a regular apartment - no ownership - she was thrilled there was no HOA.

It's a great way to make enemies of your close-by neighbors.
 
Old 07-15-2013, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Nowhere near Chicago
437 posts, read 556,005 times
Reputation: 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlb View Post
My parents moved to a condo with an HOA when they were in their 70's. Mom said it felt like living in an apartment that they didn't own - even tho they did.

It was a large 3000 sq. ft. unit - attached to another on one side.

She despised the board - and went on to become the Treasurer - and hated it even more.

After dad died she moved into a regular apartment - no ownership - she was thrilled there was no HOA.

It's a great way to make enemies of your close-by neighbors.

Having lived in S.Florida, back in the late 80's, and renting a condo, I saw firsthand the "politics" that are involved in condo boards. They called them "Condo Commandos" down there. lol Ft. Lauderdale was the worst, BACK THEN. *I have no clue how things are, now*.

Maybe an apartment is the way to go.... as long as the tenants are like minded.... meaning quiet, respectful, take pride in their living area and there's not a new tenant every year. Oh lordie... that would drive me nuts. Talk about not being able to get to know your neighbors.



bullie~

Last edited by bullie62; 07-15-2013 at 02:03 PM.. Reason: *forgot to sign off*
 
Old 07-15-2013, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Santaluz - San Diego, CA
4,485 posts, read 8,149,853 times
Reputation: 1976
Quote:
Originally Posted by oddstray View Post
And for anyone who does elect to buy in an HOA, the next best thing is to get a position on the board so you can have some say over how the place gets run.

And when you buy condo-owner's insurance, be sure that special assessments for repairs is covered under the policy.

Yes. This can be helpful but then again, it can also really be a nightmare as well. I've been on the Board of a few of the properties that I own and it almost makes enjoying the property impossible as you constantly have neighbors coming up to you pestering you with things.

They can be a real time suck as well. So yes, I do agree in principle it's a good way to know what is going on.... but be prepared to not really enjoy your time, privacy and anytime you see people it's pretty much going to be them complaining.

Plus, many HOA boards have a policy where you could get outvoted anyway and many of these HOA Boards have a position of privacy where they don't want you discussing private matters or how the vote came down. So you can totally be against a vote for something that you disagree with and they expect you to say, "The Board came up with X decision. It can be VERY frustrating so keep that in mind.
 
Old 07-15-2013, 03:41 PM
 
162 posts, read 193,196 times
Reputation: 164
Default Best place for men to retire to.

I have reviewed similar posts, but they appear to be directed to or written by single retired women. This post is directed toward the best place for retired single men. First a bit about me.

I will be retiring in about 2 years. I have lived all over the East coast. Currently, I am in Naples Florida and I really don't like Florida at all. I have lived in central NY, Maine (Portland, nice but very expensive and Maine is not a very friendly place), Pennsylvania, Richmond, VA, and the coast of North Carolina. I am attracted to West Las Vegas, but I am worried that it may be quite difficult to make friends there. I like the dryness of the area. Also,it has reasonable housing prices and it is income tax free.

I am not crazy about the Texas culture. I no longer wish to live in a place where I have shovel snow either. California is too expensive and Oregon too. Washington and Oregon rains a lot or have gray skies.I like being around blue water lakes as opposed to brown ones. I seem to have eliminated so many places. I do wish to be in a friendly place where friendships go deeper than the social politeness of saying "Good Morning".

What are other single men thinking of retiring to and why?
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top