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Old 01-03-2015, 05:55 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,997,544 times
Reputation: 15649

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Quote:
Originally Posted by popcorn247 View Post
Did you ever visit your friends in Lafayette?
Not yet. They still like living there quite a bit. He's a doctor, she's a consultant (they're in their 50s). They built a house in WLa. Seems like a really affordable place with educated population and of course the colleges.

 
Old 01-03-2015, 07:39 PM
 
130 posts, read 263,933 times
Reputation: 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by loveautumn View Post
hey, I think it's great that you've found your ideal retirement place. My comments were based on my experience visiting Richmond two years ago, you say you've have lived in larger urban cities before so I'm sure you're careful but Richmond does still have plenty of crime. I've personally been a victim of violent crime, more than once actually, so I guess I'm a little more cautious about where I tread. I wish you much happiness in Richmond.

Loveautumn, I used to think the way you did about crime news. A lot of them are local soundbites. If I can walk 20 city blocks without getting mugged, I consider that safe. I lived in NY when Times Square and Hell's Kitchen were a no-man's land, Chelsea and Bowery were still seedy, and Tribeca was just starting to attract urban pioneers who were living in lofts that they bought raw and renovated themselves. Now celebrities live in them for millions of dollars. An urban pioneer friend who lived in one of them must have profited handsomely when years later the neighborhood rose from the ashes.

I've had my share of crime experience while living there. I've been pickpocketed while standing at a cashier's counter waiting to pay for my purchase; I've been cursed for no reason while standing next to (admittedly) a crazy lunatic on the subway. And I learned to say the "F" word there. Yet, I enjoyed what the city at the time had to offer. I have not been mugged -- I stayed away from known crime areas and I kept alert.

My point is that if you decide to live in-city, and enjoy its amenities, you have to be watchful. I've been researching places to live since retiring in 2009 and my mistake was looking for a "permanent" perfect place that fulfilled all my wants on a small budget. A reality check was in order. I reordered my priorities and compromised on some and put them on the "good enough" list. It worked for me and found my place. I have been delivered from agony.

We'll see if my 5-year plan works -- that's my current realistic timetable. Who knows what's to happen 5 years from now.

Richmond was different two years ago. When I visited in 2010, I didn't feel comfortable about it then, partly because I was still comparing apples with oranges and didn't know any better. Now the city is in serious development and I'm liking it more and more. Yesterday, I went grocery shopping and for the first time tried Uber -- https://www.uber.com/ -- the uber modern "taxi" service of our time. Before I could finish applying my lipstick, the driver was out there -- within 15 minutes -- total cost $6.80. I do my heavy-duty shopping only twice a month so that's a bargain. I'll try the bus next at steeply reduced senior fares.

Yeah, I'm happy.
 
Old 01-04-2015, 01:05 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,251 times
Reputation: 17
Question Retiring Boomer looking for towns, ideas

Glad I found this thread - & re-found the site! I moved from OR to RI in 2001 and will be retiring in two years. I'm prowling for places/situations, as well. I love the idea of a group of women and/or men creating their own communal/collective piece. It takes a village to raise us at any age, yes? I love my home, but RI's property taxes alone make it too expensive for me to stay here. Clinical social worker by trade - not sure if I'll be able to give it up completely since I love the work. I'm going to be a frequent visitor to this site now - such a lot of information. I don't know if I could be land-locked & coastal towns are so expensive. I saw a mobile home on Zillow near Sequim, WA for $60K - pretty darned isolated, though & I want a social connection, as well. Since this thread was begun in 2007 - perhaps many of you have found The Answer & will let us know how you knew you found the right place? Seem to be a lot of wondering, seeing there are 600+ pages of replies!
 
Old 01-04-2015, 07:22 AM
 
1,219 posts, read 1,031,681 times
Reputation: 1997
hazfora, some really great comments and insights there! I especially like the notion of being open to a five year plan. I'm in my early fifties and unless an unexpected windfall comes my way, I'll be working until 70. So my goal is to stay as healthy as I am now while realizing there's a lot of room for improvement in that area! Hopefully my health & financial situation will both be enough at age 70 to enjoy my golden years.....but I'm open to whatever the future throws my way.
 
Old 01-06-2015, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Winter Park FL
205 posts, read 360,283 times
Reputation: 378
Quote:
Originally Posted by hazfora View Post
The problem about moving into these charming towns is public transportation. I don't relish having to drive everywhere. I have ditched my car since I retired in 2009 and have been car-less since, out of passionate choice. Having analyzed all these wonderful towns recommended or suggested by various posters in this forum, I settled on Richmond, VA. It has decent public transport and taxis and I'm right smack in the City Center area and can walk to activities, business and financial offices, restaurants and entertainment venues, post office, library and a few grocery stores. I had to compromise on the latter (i.e. walking distance to a big supermarket) but they aren't too far from me either by public transport or taxi. I just have to plan my outings efficiently. I realized that I can't have everything I enjoyed in NYC on my small budget. So Richmond is my home now. The city has lots of great plans to revive what once was a booming historic city and there's development construction everywhere. It can only get better.

Carytown is the funky area where the young congregate, but I chose a quieter area. I haven't quite settled in having moved in just this December from a 3-BR apartment to a 1BR apartment. As you can see, I will need to be judicious in editing my personal effects. But I have been known to be a space conqueror and am quite confident I'll declare victory one day, in the not-too-distant future. Being space-challenged is a temporary state and creativity can conquer it.

I have to make a final decision about what to discard from my stash of memorabilia and my daughter's childhood art and stuff. Sometimes you wonder why you keep these things and even pay for storage. I think it's our selfish desire to be remembered when we're gone. (That should be another forum thread.) Let it go, let it go, let it go! -- that will be my mantra for 2015.
Was interested to read your take on Richmond. That is where I grew up, went to school, and got married. Left years (and years) ago as a young wife and soon to be mother and well, now here I am. All those many years ago. Still am in touch with old high school friends and have 50th class reunion coming up in May. Was back there last summer and spent time with close girl friends. They want me to come back. I love how Richmond has changed and yet stayed the same. Was able to drive around going to my childhood homes, old elementary, jr. high and highschools. My parents retired from there (they are now deceased) back in the 90s so had not been back since then. The area you must live in is beautiful (and I love Cary Street - even the old deli next to the theater is still there) - but it has gotten crazy with traffic.

After all these years am still on my quest as to where to land. I thought I had found it as my kids were still east coast based. But now they are scattered living in California and Australia (along with two-year old granddaughter). Understand hanging on to your child's artwork, etc. I still have artwork, clothes, and tons of memories of my children when they were children. They don't want it and I find it hard to let go. I don't think it's so much being remembered when were gone but hanging on to the memories of the past when we weren't quite so alone.

So I am now back to where do I want to be? This can't be all there is but am also back to the complacent position of not making a decision to stay or leave. In fact, not making decisions but just rolling along. I bore even myself now.

Good luck to you in Richmond - it's still on my list. Would love the west coast if I can find something affordable. The one good thing about Florida is its afforability. But is that enough to stay...........
 
Old 01-06-2015, 09:59 AM
 
75 posts, read 104,787 times
Reputation: 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by hazfora View Post
The problem about moving into these charming towns is public transportation. I don't relish having to drive everywhere. I have ditched my car since I retired in 2009 and have been car-less since, out of passionate choice. Having analyzed all these wonderful towns recommended or suggested by various posters in this forum, I settled on Richmond, VA. It has decent public transport and taxis and I'm right smack in the City Center area and can walk to activities, business and financial offices, restaurants and entertainment venues, post office, library and a few grocery stores. I had to compromise on the latter (i.e. walking distance to a big supermarket) but they aren't too far from me either by public transport or taxi. I just have to plan my outings efficiently. I realized that I can't have everything I enjoyed in NYC on my small budget. So Richmond is my home now. The city has lots of great plans to revive what once was a booming historic city and there's development construction everywhere. It can only get better.

Carytown is the funky area where the young congregate, but I chose a quieter area. I haven't quite settled in having moved in just this December from a 3-BR apartment to a 1BR apartment. As you can see, I will need to be judicious in editing my personal effects. But I have been known to be a space conqueror and am quite confident I'll declare victory one day, in the not-too-distant future. Being space-challenged is a temporary state and creativity can conquer it.

I have to make a final decision about what to discard from my stash of memorabilia and my daughter's childhood art and stuff. Sometimes you wonder why you keep these things and even pay for storage. I think it's our selfish desire to be remembered when we're gone. (That should be another forum thread.) Let it go, let it go, let it go! -- that will be my mantra for 2015.
I applaud you for embracing a carless lifestyle--not at all easy in the United States, which is laid out more for cars than for people (sadly). But you will no doubt be healthier physically as a result of your choice.
 
Old 01-06-2015, 10:08 AM
 
Location: SW US
2,223 posts, read 2,040,423 times
Reputation: 3834
I have 90 year old friend in Chicago. She has lived in her highrise condo in Hyde Park for 40+ years. She never learned to drive and rides the bus all over Chicago, going to doctor appointments or events she wants to attend, even in the winter. Until very recently she walked to/from the grocery store but I think she now uses a taxi if she gets a lot.
Every time I talk with her, I am tempted to move there because it sounds like it has been so perfect for her old age.
 
Old 01-06-2015, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,759,876 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by jauburn View Post
I applaud you for embracing a carless lifestyle--not at all easy in the United States, which is laid out more for cars than for people (sadly). But you will no doubt be healthier physically as a result of your choice.
One cannot say that a place is "laid out more for cars than for people" because there is no such thing as a car in motion without at least the driver - a person - on board. Therefore the layout is for people who have cars or for people who do not have cars, in any case for people. I find it objectionable that you chose to dehumanize those people who have cars by the strange wording of your statement.

Further, deciding to give up one's car will not ipso facto lead to being "healthier physically". One can chose to be physically active or not quite independently of the question of car ownership. For about ten years I was a cycling enthusiast and rode regularly with a bicycle club on difficult rides. I was physically fit to a degree that the average person would not even be able to fathom. Yet I owned a car during all that time. There is no contradiction.

Your post would be more at home in the Urban Planning Forum, where the anti-car zealots find themselves in the majority.
 
Old 01-07-2015, 01:16 PM
 
130 posts, read 263,933 times
Reputation: 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
One cannot say that a place is "laid out more for cars than for people" because there is no such thing as a car in motion without at least the driver - a person - on board. Therefore the layout is for people who have cars or for people who do not have cars, in any case for people. I find it objectionable that you chose to dehumanize those people who have cars by the strange wording of your statement.

Further, deciding to give up one's car will not ipso facto lead to being "healthier physically". One can chose to be physically active or not quite independently of the question of car ownership. For about ten years I was a cycling enthusiast and rode regularly with a bicycle club on difficult rides. I was physically fit to a degree that the average person would not even be able to fathom. Yet I owned a car during all that time. There is no contradiction.

Your post would be more at home in the Urban Planning Forum, where the anti-car zealots find themselves in the majority.

@Escort Rider
I think you made a mountain out of a molehill regarding Jauburn's comment "laid out more for cars than for people." In fact, it is true that most places indeed are laid out that way. I don't think the comment was intended to dehumanize car owners or make them defensive about their choice, because it is a factual comment and did not disparage anyone.

So, in my view, there is no argument here. To recapitulate, I myself said somewhere in my previous posts that I am passionate about being car-less and that should not be taken as a statement from or by a radical fanatic. You know why? Because:
(1) I don't have or no longer have to commute to work or want to work to enjoy daily living or support a family, so I don't need a car every day;
(2) I prefer to spend any car budget on other things or activities and I can't have both without sacrificing the other; hence, my choice of living in-city. I like to be able to walk out of my building and see people walking about just like me. If I can walk to shops and restaurants, what a great bonus.
(3) I rent a car when I need to drive long distance to get to a particular destination. I consider my money well spent when it is not being spent on a machine that is unused (or infrequently used) in a garage or parking lot. Imagine, instead of spending approximately $300 to keep a car on hand, I can use the money to buy stocks. Of course, some may find driving more exciting than watching a stock you bought go up or down.

So, I'm not jealous about people who can keep both car and bike and walk. But I'm finding that having one less option leads to better discipline. It's like moving from a 1500 sf home to an apartment half that size. You learn to live on what's left or what's important to you, as an individual, and in your current circumstance.

I guess I'm trying to defend Jauburn here, because it isn't fair to misunderstand and misjudge what I thought was an innocent factual comment on his/her part.

By the way, my favorite exercise is calisthenics in bed before I get up , so walking is just a bonus from wanting to get from here to there, without boarding a bus or taxi or driving a car.
 
Old 01-07-2015, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,981 posts, read 3,470,444 times
Reputation: 10514
The statement reminded me of when I was house admitting for my sister in a suburb outside San Francisco and there were no sidewalks to walk to the little mall closest to the complex. It was terrifying and I always feared for my life as some of the drivers looked at me as if I was an intruder in their area/space.

That's what I took the statement to mean.
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