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Old 06-08-2015, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Montgomery, Alabama
68 posts, read 109,897 times
Reputation: 105

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdflk View Post
I'm in MD now, just because that's were my career took me.
But I'm retiring back in PA, tot he paid off family home. Can't wait to retire mortgage free.
AND PA happens to be a state that doesn't tax retirement income...so a double plus.
Provided you retire after 59 1/2 years of age...otherwise PA will tax you.

 
Old 06-09-2015, 12:01 AM
 
Location: Florida Gulf Coast
4,407 posts, read 5,929,861 times
Reputation: 7121
Quote:
Originally Posted by loveautumn View Post
Looks like I will have to ramp up my search. My apt complex is under new property management and they are all business and "by the book". Got notified that we will now be charged for water, trash and sewer (which is fine) except I have heard the company they are using has a lot of serious complaints against it (like how do we know what we are being billed is actually correct?) and the cost will add probably another $100 to my budget. We won't know until we actually start getting billed how bad it will be. I know this is a trend all over the US now so I wasn't totally surprised but the amount was more than I thought it would be.

Also, the rents are being increased substantially. I haven't gotten my notice yet but one person I know had theirs increased $700. They were definitely underpaying but $700 is a lot to absorb. I'm guessing mine will be around $250, which is bad enough. I can't sustain these kinds of increases in the future, but I feel pretty much backed into a corner to pay it for another year until I can make a move that is well planned out. Feeling sad today because I've lived here a long time and have some good friends/neighbors here and eventually we will all go our separate ways.

Free advice, if you are going to rent in retirement, don't move to any of the major metro areas, and definitely not California, because rents are skyrocketing (mainly because of gentrification IMHO) or any of the "in" places to move because this is happening in a lot of places. The middle class is being pushed out. But I've had a good run here and I guess this is motivating me to take the next step. I'm feeling scared too because as I've gotten a little older now, I realize moving somewhere by myself is going to be hard. But I just have to take it one day at a time, one step at a time.
Well, I'm sorry to hear this, but looking forward to hearing where you do actually land. You know I've been following your situation for awhile, and you are one of the only people who seems to have no specific place in mind and is open to a new adventure...somewhere! It must be a daunting task, gathering information on so many disparate areas, doing the site visits, etc. I guess I would just recommend going to a place where there are a lot of transplants, or snowbirds, so that you don't end up in a small town where the locals are cliquish and the culture is shockingly different.
 
Old 06-09-2015, 09:38 AM
 
Location: middle tennessee
1,926 posts, read 991,367 times
Reputation: 6981
"I guess I would just recommend going to a place where there are a lot of transplants, or snowbirds, so that you don't end up in a small town where the locals are cliquish and the culture is shockingly different."

I think this is great advice for anyone! The locals don't realize they are "shockingly different". They are normal and you aren't from here. I have lived in the south for 50 years and I'm still "not from here".

You can get used to it or not let it bother you to begin with, or it can make you mighty lonesome.
 
Old 06-09-2015, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Florida Gulf Coast
4,407 posts, read 5,929,861 times
Reputation: 7121
Quote:
Originally Posted by boogie'smom View Post
"I guess I would just recommend going to a place where there are a lot of transplants, or snowbirds, so that you don't end up in a small town where the locals are cliquish and the culture is shockingly different."

I think this is great advice for anyone! The locals don't realize they are "shockingly different". They are normal and you aren't from here. I have lived in the south for 50 years and I'm still "not from here".

You can get used to it or not let it bother you to begin with, or it can make you mighty lonesome.
Well, haha, I meant the "culture" is shockingly different, not the people themselves, but you got my point. I was totally a fish-out-of-water when I moved to Southern Calif. from the East Coast. Had not anticipated how different the culture was -- not in a bad way, in fact in many good ways -- but it is something you need to be prepared for so you don't automatically get homesick without giving your new location a chance.

Local politics is also a biggie; e.g., if you're on the liberal side moving to a conservative area.

I just bring this up because it is not mentioned as a factor in many of the posts regarding "where to live", and to me, it is one of THE most important factors in whether you'll assimilate well to a new location.

Wow, so after FIFTY years, you're STILL not a local??!!
 
Old 06-09-2015, 10:42 AM
 
Location: middle tennessee
1,926 posts, read 991,367 times
Reputation: 6981
I am southern and can't imagine living anywhere else or I would be there, but no, I was born in California so I am not "from here". It helps that my dad was born here.

It is probably no longer a big deal for younger people. To people my age and older, it still matters.
 
Old 06-09-2015, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Florida
27 posts, read 31,959 times
Reputation: 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by meo92953 View Post
For myself, it's been really rainy and overcast for the last couple of days & my leg & back are throbbing & painful. I'm waiting to see how the winter goes to see if I will stay. I'm close to 2 family members here & would be close to 1 if I moved to Tennessee. So it's a toss-up. When you've lived with snow all your life it does become become a deterrent, but as soon as Spring comes, you get busy and bask in the sun.
Here I am in an income-based apartment & so many folks in this building knew my Mom, acceptance was immediate. A man getting gas at the gas station noticed I was having trouble trying to check the air in my tires (I can no longer bend so if I get down I have to crawl to something to get up) & he not only asked if he could help but made sure he checked all of them when he found one low. This is Minnesota & that's how people act here. I don't know how they act in Tennessee. I do plan on visiting but I guess my heart is here.
Tennessee is not particularly rainy. It rains the most in spring, and there are summer thunderstorms depending on where you are in the state, but it's not that much different from summer in the Twin Cities. It's more humid and a little hotter, but I venture you wouldn't find it unbearable even with your health issues.

The part of the state where your brother lives will dictate how much snow you might expect. TN winters are dry like MN winters. There's fairly little snow in the Knoxville area because the city sits in a valley that gets passed over by most weather systems. The west side of the state gets more severe winters, and Nashville can get pretty icy. On the east side there are really only a few days in the winter where it's really too cold or messy to go outside, though, so if your brother's anywhere near there you might be happy.

I lived in both Knoxville and Minneapolis and the dry air in the winter is very similar in both. It's the amounts of relentless snow that's really the biggest difference.

Having said all that, it sounds like you are very happy where you are. I hope whatever you decide it works out for you.

(Back to lurking for me; I am not near retirement age but am a single woman and plan to remain so, so I'm already thinking about retirement planning in my 40s. Unlike most of you I want to go home to New England, Rhode Island if I can swing it. Right now I'm in Florida which is good for my aging parents, who live here, but I miss the seasons and the culture of home. It costs a lot less to live in Florida, but you get what you pay for.)
 
Old 06-09-2015, 02:41 PM
 
4,574 posts, read 7,063,489 times
Reputation: 4222
Default I guess I would just recommend going to a place where there are a lot of transplants

That is such great advice. I have thought this myself, although I forget sometimes just how important it is. I have to admit that I've done research on a lot of areas in the US, and it's been fun, frustrating sometimes but very educational. But haven't made any real investments in site visits in the last few years because I have a limited budget to do so, so I want to make sure the places are very real possibilities before I go there. I guess the only places that really have a lot of transplants from all over are California, Florida and the larger metros in Texas?, which to me are worlds unto themselves. Seattle is open to people from the west. Some states like North Carolina are getting more transplant-friendly, as well as TN and places like Charleston are growing but it seems the culture there is still difficult to break in to, even if one is open to it. They have to be open to the transplants as well, which isn't always the case. the cities more so, but if you get out of the city, then it can be an issue. Not sure why but I have always had a feeling that I would have a difficult time adapting to anyplace in the south and I guess I should trust my gut on that...although that is where the COL is still lower. I always figured I had a fall back to Upstate NY as I was born and raised there but I tried to move back there once (a very long time ago) and I might as well been from Mars the minute you say you lived in California. They themselves know that if you've lived in a better place, you won't be happy there. These smaller cities/towns are hard to assimilate, especially as a single. This is a lot harder than I thought it would be. I'm still considering Florida, maybe Jacksonville area.

I'm very interested to hear what areas have you found or think are most open to transplants?
 
Old 06-09-2015, 04:20 PM
 
14,264 posts, read 24,004,620 times
Reputation: 20092
Quote:
Originally Posted by loveautumn View Post
I'm very interested to hear what areas have you found or think are most open to transplants?

My initial reaction was "an area with a lot of transplants."

People who relocate in an area often times expect everyone to greet them with open arms. However, generally, that does NOT happen. If you are moving to a new area and you expect to be welcomed into the community, you have to do something to meet people - join a church, volunteer at a local charity, join a club, etc.

One advantage to 55+ communities is that there are many new people entering the community and a great number of activities that will allow you to meet others.
 
Old 06-09-2015, 04:21 PM
 
Location: SW US
2,220 posts, read 2,037,561 times
Reputation: 3829
Lots of retirees from all over in Arizona retirement areas.
 
Old 06-09-2015, 04:46 PM
 
4,574 posts, read 7,063,489 times
Reputation: 4222
yeah, all those Arizona transplants come over to San Diego for the summer to get out of the awful heat...we call them "zonies". Actually we really like them and they fit right in here!
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