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Old 06-09-2015, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Florida
27 posts, read 32,272 times
Reputation: 71

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Quote:
Originally Posted by boogie'smom View Post
I am southern and can't imagine living anywhere else or I would be there, but no, I was born in California so I am not "from here". It helps that my dad was born here.

It is probably no longer a big deal for younger people. To people my age and older, it still matters.
I caught the 'you're not from here' attitude from plenty of younger people (30s-40s) while I was living in Knoxville. People are mostly perfectly nice, but it was very evident that I would never fit in. Anyway, I don't think the sentiment is dying quite as quickly as you imagine.

 
Old 06-09-2015, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,785,397 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by writerlibrarian View Post
I caught the 'you're not from here' attitude from plenty of younger people (30s-40s) while I was living in Knoxville. People are mostly perfectly nice, but it was very evident that I would never fit in. Anyway, I don't think the sentiment is dying quite as quickly as you imagine.
One of the things I like about Southern California is the near total absence of any concern or importance given to where people are "from". I arrived here at age 14, so at 71 I feel like a native even if I am not technically. But none of that makes any difference. When I think about the many people I know - colleagues, ex-colleagues, neighbors, etc., I don't even know where at least half of them were born and grew up. It's just not something of any great interest.
 
Old 06-09-2015, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Florida Gulf Coast
4,414 posts, read 5,947,309 times
Reputation: 7149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
One of the things I like about Southern California is the near total absence of any concern or importance given to where people are "from". I arrived here at age 14, so at 71 I feel like a native even if I am not technically. But none of that makes any difference. When I think about the many people I know - colleagues, ex-colleagues, neighbors, etc., I don't even know where at least half of them were born and grew up. It's just not something of any great interest.
Well, it is so interesting you say that, because I felt that attitude when I lived out there -- total disinterest in where I had come from. When I hear someone has moved to (wherever I am) from another state, especially clear across the country, I am always curious about what brought them here, how they like it, is it very different, etc. In CA, I felt like I could have said I was from Mars and no one would have cared. I felt that Californians were wrapped up in their own little world -- paradise in many ways, so I suppose they don't particularly have to care about or wonder what it's like to live anywhere else. It felt superficial, like no relationships went very deep. I hope you understand I am not being critical; this is just one of the differences in cultures that can make it difficult to transition to a new state.
 
Old 06-09-2015, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Florida Gulf Coast
4,414 posts, read 5,947,309 times
Reputation: 7149
Quote:
Originally Posted by loveautumn View Post
That is such great advice. I have thought this myself, although I forget sometimes just how important it is. I have to admit that I've done research on a lot of areas in the US, and it's been fun, frustrating sometimes but very educational. But haven't made any real investments in site visits in the last few years because I have a limited budget to do so, so I want to make sure the places are very real possibilities before I go there. I guess the only places that really have a lot of transplants from all over are California, Florida and the larger metros in Texas?, which to me are worlds unto themselves. Seattle is open to people from the west. Some states like North Carolina are getting more transplant-friendly, as well as TN and places like Charleston are growing but it seems the culture there is still difficult to break in to, even if one is open to it. They have to be open to the transplants as well, which isn't always the case. the cities more so, but if you get out of the city, then it can be an issue. Not sure why but I have always had a feeling that I would have a difficult time adapting to anyplace in the south and I guess I should trust my gut on that...although that is where the COL is still lower. I always figured I had a fall back to Upstate NY as I was born and raised there but I tried to move back there once (a very long time ago) and I might as well been from Mars the minute you say you lived in California. They themselves know that if you've lived in a better place, you won't be happy there. These smaller cities/towns are hard to assimilate, especially as a single. This is a lot harder than I thought it would be. I'm still considering Florida, maybe Jacksonville area.

I'm very interested to hear what areas have you found or think are most open to transplants?
Well, as someone mentioned, your retirement states of FL and AZ have a lot of snowbirds and transplants; certain areas of NC, etc. You just have to do your research -- I remember a co-worker moved to some town in AZ and didn't realize the community was primarily Mormon. The Atlantic coast of Florida is a lot of East Coasters -- NY/NJ/Phila. snowbirds and retirees. The Gulf coast is primarily folks from the Midwest -- a way different scene from the other side of FL. I can't speak for Jacksonville, but in my opinion, if you're considering FL, get as close to the water as you can so the humidity will be more tolerable, especially given where you're coming from with its perfect climate. I live near the Gulf and there is almost always a nice breeze that makes it nice in the shade, even in summer.

Or hey, this is not near the water but have you heard of The Villages in FL? Now THERE you will find all kinds of people and activities; everyone I know who has looked there has ended up moving there and loving it. I prefer to be on the Coast and closer to a large city though.

Anyway, keep us posted on your search....
 
Old 06-10-2015, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Florida
27 posts, read 32,272 times
Reputation: 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avalon08 View Post
The Gulf coast is primarily folks from the Midwest
That's funny because I live right next door to Sun City Center (the entire town is a 55+ community) and many of the people I've met are from New England. Most of them, I'd wager. My parents live on the Space Coast and I met plenty of New Yorkers while I was over there for sure, but I think the gulf coast, at least in the Bay area, is diversifying with snowbirds and retirees of all stripes.
 
Old 06-10-2015, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Florida Gulf Coast
4,414 posts, read 5,947,309 times
Reputation: 7149
Quote:
Originally Posted by writerlibrarian View Post
That's funny because I live right next door to Sun City Center (the entire town is a 55+ community) and many of the people I've met are from New England. Most of them, I'd wager. My parents live on the Space Coast and I met plenty of New Yorkers while I was over there for sure, but I think the gulf coast, at least in the Bay area, is diversifying with snowbirds and retirees of all stripes.
Where I am in Bradenton, it's primarily Mich/Wisc/Minn/Ind/OH/Western NY/Pittsburgh, some New England. Still not many East Coasters as in NY/NJ/PA, they're usually all on the I-95 corridor. Or The Villages.
 
Old 06-10-2015, 10:38 AM
 
4,577 posts, read 7,079,434 times
Reputation: 4233
Aren't the Villages homes that you have to purchase? I think awhile back I looked up information on the Villages and it seemed like it would appeal to mostly couples?
 
Old 06-10-2015, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Florida
27 posts, read 32,272 times
Reputation: 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by loveautumn View Post
Aren't the Villages homes that you have to purchase? I think awhile back I looked up information on the Villages and it seemed like it would appeal to mostly couples?
The Villages is a planned retirement community that you buy into, yes. Since I'm not their target demographic, I don't know that much about it other than that it's there, it's popular, and it can be a hassle to drive through. I will defer to Avalon's expertise regarding the resident demographics.

Honestly there are so many people from all over down here though that anyone is bound to find someone like-minded if they try hard enough. Florida isn't for everyone, that's for sure, and many people decide they can't take the summers, which are hotter on the gulf coast than they are on the Atlantic. But if you don't end up hating it enough to leave, eventually you find your niche. It has its charms, and I don't *mind*, Florida, speaking for myself, but I miss home more and more the older I get.
 
Old 06-10-2015, 05:55 PM
 
2,297 posts, read 1,570,958 times
Reputation: 2747
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhxBarb View Post
Anyone consider moving to the middle of the US? Am looking into Columbia, MO which is just 385miles from Chicago, where my son and fam live. Anyone have any opinions about Columbia?? I posted on the MO forum but no one answered (yet). U of Missouri, great Osher program, 17% senior population and 4 seasons. Hot and humid in summer. But it can't be worse than Phoenix for heat.
I'm moving from Northern Cal to Sioux Falls SD, my orignal home state. I'm single and will have a support system there, but it's also a nice metro area, although cold in the winter, of course. I'll easily save 1500 a month by moving there....which I plan to use to be gone for a significant part of the winter!!
 
Old 06-10-2015, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Prescott AZ
6,138 posts, read 9,119,409 times
Reputation: 11602
Quote:
Originally Posted by Burkmere View Post
I'm moving from Northern Cal to Sioux Falls SD, my orignal home state. I'm single and will have a support system there, but it's also a nice metro area, although cold in the winter, of course. I'll easily save 1500 a month by moving there....which I plan to use to be gone for a significant part of the winter!!
Oh thank you for answering ! Sioux Falls is very pretty for sure. I booked my ticket, ugh, on an airplane, after deciding it was too far to drive to Missouri, so I will be seeing parts of MO around June 21. House is listed so hoping for a quick sale at a good price. Liquor me up and give me a valium prior to departure, please.
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