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Old 01-10-2009, 12:05 PM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 12,052,621 times
Reputation: 2141

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Quote:
Originally Posted by catfancier View Post
Well in my experience with my mother's Medicare Advantage plan...doctors are NOT willing to take it! Ditto for her home health care agency, which dropped her like the proverbial hot potato when her coverage was switched on her and all her fellow retirees in their plan...and just yesterday I had the truly heartbreaking news that the lovely nursing home we were considering for her will NOT take a Medicare Advantage plan. (For a short-term post-hospital stay, but we planned to segue into permanent placement and a Medicaid application.) Hers is with Aetna but they're all the same in that, somehow, someway, the doctors/vendors do NOT get the same amount of money they would with traditional Medicare. I am determined to get someone to explain this to me -- Aetna just says "if a doctor usually takes Medicare AND ACCEPTS OUR TERMS AND CONDITIONS (the killer phrase I'm sure) then there should be no problem."

Right now I would like to find all health insurance executives and go on a homicidal rampage.
This is scary. If they are getting less, then it is because the insurance companies are getting more. They become a middle man between the 1st insurer and the doctor.

So far, my mother's Kaiser-medicare experience has been good. She has gotten the care she needs and it has been good quality. When she wasn't satisfied, her Kaiser doctor listened to her concerns and took a different path.

 
Old 01-10-2009, 12:10 PM
 
3 posts, read 5,479 times
Reputation: 11
Default where to go?

Dear Wisteria,

I, too, am your age and have pondered the exact same thing...where to go?

The cost of living in California is outrages.......New York is too fast for me....I am too young for the old aged home. I've thought about mountainous homes in Tennesse, I've thought about buying homes in neighborhoods just to have a garden, but then the thought of 15 million baby strollers going down the street didn't set to well with me. Don't get me wrong..I love kids..had three of them and three grandchildrn....but I am NOT going to spend any more time around other kids if I can help it! HA HA. I've thought about Florida...Lived in MiamI when i was in my twenties.....it won't work now. When I read your post I thought you might be my twin...anytime you want to discuss this you can email me [mod] sorry, no private e-mails here . DM instead. [/mod]
I am as stumped as you, however.

Thanks,

Hope to hear back from you.

PS I now live in Atlanta..which is ok if you are in the right spot.

Last edited by nancy thereader; 01-10-2009 at 01:19 PM..
 
Old 01-10-2009, 12:32 PM
 
Location: AZ Desert Rat (NOT!)
20 posts, read 54,498 times
Reputation: 43
Knoxgarden, you make Knoxville sound like such a terrific place...a couple of questions though: is it green? after years in the desert, I yearn for grass and greenery and "normal" landscape, and like most of us, I don't want too much humidity - what are the summers like?

Ironically, I was having lunch with an interesting group of people last Sunday and TWO women brought up Chico, California (which I'd never even heard of until this thread). They were saying what a cool little town it is, they are seeking an interesting place to live with like-minded people and access to an urban area such as San Francisco, yet affordable...well, yadayadayada - two more women for our group. OH, and I found a couple of men who'd fit in very well....we all determined they were so cool they were almost women!

I've also contemplated Asheville, NC - sounds like an eclectic community and the University of North Carolina has its Center for Creative Retirement that has some cool programs!

And of course given the current market and parental concerns, I may wind up staying in Arizona but would hope to at least manage to get to Prescott or Jerome or Bisbee (last two are very artsy, interesting, old-hippie (I'm concluding this is me too) towns).

Maybe I need to take a road trip to NM - for some reason it has never called to me but y'all are a smart group of women so how could you be wrong?!

And life in Yuma can't be all bad...it's only 3 hours to San Diego!

Happy new year to all and welcome to our newbies.
 
Old 01-10-2009, 12:42 PM
 
Location: AZ Desert Rat (NOT!)
20 posts, read 54,498 times
Reputation: 43
I was chuckling too at the image of all of us doing the same thing on Saturday nights...watching Suze! For me, followed by my British sitcoms on PBS...
 
Old 01-10-2009, 01:06 PM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 12,052,621 times
Reputation: 2141
I'm not Knoxgarden, but I have been in a lot of areas in country...
Quote:
Originally Posted by rmebrt View Post
Knoxgarden, you make Knoxville sound like such a terrific place...a couple of questions though: is it green? after years in the desert, I yearn for grass and greenery and "normal" landscape, and like most of us, I don't want too much humidity - what are the summers like?
Tennessee is very green. Even in a drought, eastern droughts are nothing like normal dryness in the west. There is still a lot of green left even in the drought periods. Normally it is very green. Summer thunderstorms and winter rain, snow, ice storms at fairly regular intervals.

However, especially to a desert rat, TN is humid. It is pretty far south and gets both the humid Atlantic summer air and the humid Gulf air. If you came from Alabama, you might not think so, but coming from where you are... It's humid. It has the hot and humid summer climate that is all over the SE. (Something I wish to leave behind me when I relocate.). Greenery comes at a price.
Quote:
Ironically, I was having lunch with an interesting group of people last Sunday and TWO women brought up Chico, California (which I'd never even heard of until this thread). They were saying what a cool little town it is, they are seeking an interesting place to live with like-minded people and access to an urban area such as San Francisco, yet affordable...well, yadayadayada - two more women for our group. OH, and I found a couple of men who'd fit in very well....we all determined they were so cool they were almost women!
Chico is not very close to SFO. It is a trip to get there with overnight accommodations most likely needed as there would be little time left in the day to try for a day outing. Heck, when I lived in Davis or Sacramento, it was not a spur of the moment jaunt and they are a lot closer than Chico is. CA valley towns are quite different than SFO or other coastal towns in the lifestyle and vibe. Chico is fairly isolated from big city sensibilities. On the plus side, it is a college town (tho a notorious party school) and is closer to the mountains than a lot of the valley towns. Paradise is not far and in the Sierra foothills - quite pretty and a little more moderated climate. Chico also has blistering hot summers.
Quote:
...

And life in Yuma can't be all bad...it's only 3 hours to San Diego!
Oh yes it can. If you had ever seen Yuma...
It is very hot and there's no water in the Co river down there to moderate the temps. There was always a running threat where I work to send you if management hated your guts -Yuma or Glasgow.
 
Old 01-10-2009, 01:20 PM
 
Location: home...finally, home .
8,236 posts, read 18,516,359 times
Reputation: 17765
rmebert:
they were so cool they were almost women

Love this analogy.
__________________
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People may not recall what you said to them, but they will always remember how you made them feel .
 
Old 01-10-2009, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
2,172 posts, read 6,887,502 times
Reputation: 1525
East Tennessee is very green and I don't think it's that humid. Knoxville is up in the mountains -- foothills actually -- so humidity rarely gets above 30-40 percent in the summer. Temps stay in the mid-80s during the day and drop to comfortable levels at night. I rarely run the AC during the day in the summer.
Nashville is flatter and a lot more humid and out in the Delta -- Memphis -- it's hot.
What Tennessee has is lots of green space and farms between cities. The family farm is still alive and well here and the state is working to keep them that way.
This is one example. It's a sheep farm located in Knoxville. As you can see in the photo, lots of green.
Locust Grove Farm - Farmstead Sheep's Milk Cheese & Natural Lamb
Their cheese is wonderful and addictive. I would buy some every week at the Farmers' Market during growing season.
Knoxville is broken up by a lot of ridges with roads and developments running along the top and down at the bottom. There's no "flat" here and buildable areas are broken up by steep ridge tops. So you don't get the orderly subdivisions spreading out for miles that you get in flatter areas.
I live in a condo in a developed area in West Knoxville and there are a lot of subdivisions around me. But there's also a working dairly farm two miles down the road that uses the steep area in between ridges for pasture.
 
Old 01-10-2009, 02:46 PM
 
Location: SW US
2,218 posts, read 2,036,207 times
Reputation: 3824
This may not be relevant to many, but it was a deciding factor against Tennessee for me. Naturopaths are not allowed to practice in Tenn. There are only two states that prohibit them, but I can't remember which is the other one right now. I'm very much into alternative healing and see this as, well, a rather blatant attempt by the allopathic medical community to limit access to alternatives. In Arizona, naturopaths are licensed by the state.
 
Old 01-10-2009, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,954 posts, read 7,393,688 times
Reputation: 16283
Quote:
Originally Posted by knoxgarden View Post
East Tennessee is very green and I don't think it's that humid. Knoxville is up in the mountains -- foothills actually -- so humidity rarely gets above 30-40 percent in the summer. Temps stay in the mid-80s during the day and drop to comfortable levels at night. I rarely run the AC during the day in the summer.
Nashville is flatter and a lot more humid and out in the Delta -- Memphis -- it's hot.
What Tennessee has is lots of green space and farms between cities. The family farm is still alive and well here and the state is working to keep them that way.

Knoxville is broken up by a lot of ridges with roads and developments running along the top and down at the bottom. There's no "flat" here and buildable areas are broken up by steep ridge tops. So you don't get the orderly subdivisions spreading out for miles that you get in flatter areas.
I live in a condo in a developed area in West Knoxville and there are a lot of subdivisions around me. But there's also a working dairly farm two miles down the road that uses the steep area in between ridges for pasture.
Knox - Where were you from originally?
 
Old 01-10-2009, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
2,172 posts, read 6,887,502 times
Reputation: 1525
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN2CO View Post
Knox - Where were you from originally?
Born and raised in Los Angeles. Westchester, out by LAX, to be specific.
Went to my last two years of college in Washington, D.C. and stayed there for most of my life, working in politics, newspapers, lobbyists, government, etc. Spent a lot of time in New York, too.
Followed a job offer to southern Georgia and was there for about 10 years. That was very hot and very humid and very Southern.
For the last couple of years in Georgia was traveling a lot and spent a lot of time in Knoxville and fell in love with it. When the job and I parted company, I headed to Knoxville. It has what I want. It's a real little city with a nice downtown, plenty of things to do, wonderful people, beautiful setting, great four-seaons weather. It also has manageable traffic and crowds. It's easy to get out and do things.
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