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Old 10-07-2007, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Monterey Bay, California -- watching the sea lions, whales and otters! :D
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Thank you, Forest Beekeeper, for that information. Actually, I have heard about things like that, only I did not know the actual term for it. As you may know, in California, with Proposition 13, property taxes cannot be more than .01% of the value of the property....which makes it "affordable" to have a more expensive home, contrasted to my dad's situation where he has a home valued at much less, but pays so much more in taxes. I will keep this information you gave and use it in my search -- thank you!!

Quote:
Katie45: I have 401k and am saving every penny I can and I think with her idea, and with brightdoglover's 55+ mobile home park idea...I am heading in the right direction.

Trapped in paradise: Loss of rent control leaves De Anza residents with little hope - By SHANNA MCCORD - Sentinel staff writer - October 7, 2007 (http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/archive/2007/October/07/local/stories/01local.htm - broken link)

I just read this article this morning in our local paper....what happened is a large mobile home company raised rents so much that now people can't sell their homes, or new people can't afford to move in unless they are, basically, millionaires. The people who live there now have rent control, once they move it goes away and the lot is rented at market value. It's an interesting article about how this happened, and is a good thing to be aware of, considering this is a large national company. It's one reason I am hesitant to consider a mobile home, although their initial cost is enticing. Hope this helps some people in their search.

This is great information, all.
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Old 10-07-2007, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Land of 10000 Lakes + some
2,885 posts, read 1,512,099 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nancy thereader View Post
Our property taxes have been under $50/year.

Can this be possible? People on Long Island pay over $9,000 for small homes!



Yes, if you live far away from a big city and have quite a bit of acreage, your taxes can be very low.
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Old 10-07-2007, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,682 posts, read 49,443,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lillietta View Post
[/b][/i]

Yes, if you live far away from a big city and have quite a bit of acreage, your taxes can be very low.
True, not likely inside city limits and in this case you have to own five acres or more. Fortunately at $350 an acre, at least the acreage is not expensive
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Old 10-09-2007, 08:42 AM
 
44 posts, read 159,128 times
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Exclamation Sorry to say that...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisteria View Post
Thank you, Forest Beekeeper, for that information. Actually, I have heard about things like that, only I did not know the actual term for it. As you may know, in California, with Proposition 13, property taxes cannot be more than .01% of the value of the property....which makes it "affordable" to have a more expensive home, contrasted to my dad's situation where he has a home valued at much less, but pays so much more in taxes. I will keep this information you gave and use it in my search -- thank you!!




Trapped in paradise: Loss of rent control leaves De Anza residents with little hope - By SHANNA MCCORD - Sentinel staff writer - October 7, 2007 (http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/archive/2007/October/07/local/stories/01local.htm - broken link)

I just read this article this morning in our local paper....what happened is a large mobile home company raised rents so much that now people can't sell their homes, or new people can't afford to move in unless they are, basically, millionaires. The people who live there now have rent control, once they move it goes away and the lot is rented at market value. It's an interesting article about how this happened, and is a good thing to be aware of, considering this is a large national company. It's one reason I am hesitant to consider a mobile home, although their initial cost is enticing. Hope this helps some people in their search.

This is great information, all.
Sorry to chime in on this topic or be the bearer of bad news but, I once owned a mobile home and it was a nightmare!
There is a worldwide push (a silent underground one by community politics and politicians) to slowly get rid of these homes, because the overall rep. is that they are eyesores and the tenents are undiserable.
Besides, why just get rent from people who still can't sometimes pay when it is easier to force them out legally? by raising the rent very high. Then when the folks are all out, the place gets bulldozed and turned into Condo's. This is the truth-I've seen it happen much too often in every state that I've lived!
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Old 10-09-2007, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Oxygen Ln. AZ
9,321 posts, read 16,579,200 times
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I think I would be cautious moving to anything that has rent attached to it. Those are the things to watch out for when you are older. Property taxes going up are enough to worry about. There are communities in N. CA that you can find a small but decent mobile home and own the land. Magalia, CA is one of them. realtor.com go to 95954 to see what you can see. In fact recently one of the mobile home parks in Paradise CA had made the papers because the owner had raised the rents very high and some were in danger of losing everything. The push is on to build condos or luxury homes in some areas. We are even leary of HOA's any more, but that is all they seem to be building now.
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Old 10-15-2007, 05:34 PM
 
10,332 posts, read 9,376,947 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotleyCrew View Post
I think I would be cautious moving to anything that has rent attached to it. Those are the things to watch out for when you are older. Property taxes going up are enough to worry about. There are communities in N. CA that you can find a small but decent mobile home and own the land. Magalia, CA is one of them. realtor.com go to 95954 to see what you can see. In fact recently one of the mobile home parks in Paradise CA had made the papers because the owner had raised the rents very high and some were in danger of losing everything. The push is on to build condos or luxury homes in some areas. We are even leary of HOA's any more, but that is all they seem to be building now.
Agreed, rents can and will escalate. However, one has to make the decision whether to rent or buy based on their particular situation (age, capital, whether they currently own a home, income, living situation, health, etc.); and in some cases it is better to rent vs buying. We all have to carefully explore all avenues and make the decision that is best for each of us.
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Old 10-20-2007, 04:01 AM
 
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Katie in ocala fl the Active Adult Communities - Active Adult Community - Adult Retirement Communities IT'S CALLED STONE CREEK
They got villias for 160.000 i was up there last week looking . this weekend there having a big sale give the one in ocala a call it was really nice a big pool indoor and out nice area not to busy .good luck (del webb)
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Old 10-20-2007, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Oxygen Ln. AZ
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There is a Pulte development in Ocala called Fore Ranch. The home we were thinking of purchasing last year is down to $169K from the high price of $207K. Some of the incentives are decent as well.

There is a Del Webb development in Davenport, Fl and the prices start in the low, low $200K's. They are planning on starting the town homes soon. The HOA fees are low and I believe that the homeowners insurance for the area is somewhat lower than other areas closer to the coast.
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Old 10-20-2007, 10:06 AM
 
13,319 posts, read 25,558,234 times
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Retiring is a big topic on my night shift, as many night workers are over 50, and my job has a wonderful old-fashioned pension plan. Not everyone has been in the plan that long, and a few people came to the hospital late in life to get vested (five years). I have some 15 years, and it's a wonderful benefit.
The conversation comes down to, what are people going to do, how will they/we live, what about people who haven't saved anything? And I say, people will do what they have to do, whatever that is. Move to a trailer in Arkansas or somewhere that isn't likely to get developed? Whatever they have to do. Now, a lot of my co-workers are divorced women, and those who are RNs can make a good living. But there are only a few that have done the prudent things for the future earlier on.
People will do what they have to do, whatever that is.
I personally wonder about the next state after retirement, that is, car-dependence. So many people live in car-dependent places, and don't necessarily have access to transport or grown children to transport them and stuff. In my area, anything near the city or on major transport lines is quite expensive. Maybe that will change as more numbers of people need to move away from cars, but I do see problems ahead.
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Old 10-21-2007, 04:51 AM
 
10,332 posts, read 9,376,947 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
Retiring is a big topic on my night shift, as many night workers are over 50, and my job has a wonderful old-fashioned pension plan. Not everyone has been in the plan that long, and a few people came to the hospital late in life to get vested (five years). I have some 15 years, and it's a wonderful benefit.
The conversation comes down to, what are people going to do, how will they/we live, what about people who haven't saved anything? And I say, people will do what they have to do, whatever that is. Move to a trailer in Arkansas or somewhere that isn't likely to get developed? Whatever they have to do. Now, a lot of my co-workers are divorced women, and those who are RNs can make a good living. But there are only a few that have done the prudent things for the future earlier on.
People will do what they have to do, whatever that is.
I personally wonder about the next state after retirement, that is, car-dependence. So many people live in car-dependent places, and don't necessarily have access to transport or grown children to transport them and stuff. In my area, anything near the city or on major transport lines is quite expensive. Maybe that will change as more numbers of people need to move away from cars, but I do see problems ahead.
Excellent posting! I recently looked into a so-called "retirement" apartment complex in San Antonio, TX. The rents are within reason, but here is the kicker: they have income restrictions ($22k for one person) and you have to prove you are employed. Well, if I'm retiring, that obviously will not work. That complex should be more accurately called "low income" housing, not a retirement community.

I too would like to find a place to live where I would not be required to own and maintain a car...that is a very expensive budget killer. But, like you wrote, to find affordable housing near doctors/shopping, and/or offers a free "shuttle/bus" service for retirees, is not as easy proposition (and one in a climate that is not severe).

There are many out there who are "sharks" and eagerly waiting for the retirees so they can drain them dry. And hopefully, there may be someone who will not be so greedy. But, with all the retirees in the next 5-10+ yrs., anything that is truly "affordable" and decent will be very hard to come by.

I, for one, do not have the funds to go out and purchase a home and be able to afford the upkeep/taxes/insurance and whatever else it takes to buy a house. I will have to rent and be dependent on a landlord. I do not own a home now, so I don't have that to fall back on. I have 401k but it isn't a huge amount, and will have to survive on s/s, whatever 401k I have, and whatever amount I can save up in the next few years.

And obviously I will not be able to spend $3k a month at a Del Webb retirement community.

People will say, Buy don't Rent...but it is not always feasible to do so.

I have heard that many are starting to take in a roommate, and that is an option as well. But there are many things to take into consideration before that route is taken.

We will all just have to do the best we can with what we have.
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