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Old 08-19-2012, 02:12 AM
 
Location: California
3,904 posts, read 4,888,643 times
Reputation: 3084

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California was ranked 50th last time I checked on places to retire.
As far as northern states go, if you can stand the cold I have heard
that Wyoming and Pennsylvania are good states to retire in. Also,
it is my understanding that Washington state is also good. New Mexico
intrigues me but I've heard there are some downsides to retiring there.
I am not a fan of humidity I know anywhere east of the Rockies will
get plenty of humidity. I could stand short summers if I had to with some
cold winters. That is why I included Pennsylvania. I Realize there are some southern
states that rank well as inexpensive retirement destinations but I just could not
endure the long hot humid days. Your replies are appreciated.
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Old 08-19-2012, 03:19 AM
 
13,320 posts, read 25,565,364 times
Reputation: 20505
If I move in retirement (several years away for full retirement) it would likely be because I can't afford my current East Coast location, essentially housing. However, I could choose to live in a mobile home park in my area or move a couple of hours north to a small New England city. I also cannot stand humidity and would never retire somewhere more humid because of cheaper life- I'd rather live in a trailer in the Northeast. I find Boston summers unbearably humid, and increasingly so.
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Old 08-19-2012, 04:57 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 26,917,465 times
Reputation: 42861
You'll find lots of good advice in this thread:

Retiring on a literal shoestring: support group

There are four things I've learned from having been on this forum awhile:

1) Every single town has good point and bad points. Seriously, there will be something that you dislike no matter where you choose to go--don't get caught in the trap of trying to find a perfect place; that's a sure road to lifelong misery. The trick is to decide which bad points you can live with.

2) Places that seem like a bargain often have hidden expenses. For a long time I was interested in living in Delaware because of the low taxes there. But the more I looked into it, the more I discovered it wasn't the "retiree deal of the century" I had thought. Some things were inexpensive, other things turned out to be surprisingly expensive, and there were some expenses that don't exist at all in other cities (The areas I liked in DE have land lease issues, for example). Sometime the "expensive" cities turn out to be fairly good bargains once you remove the cost of buying a house (which may not be a factor for everyone, for example those living with family members).

3) Places that are dirt cheap can be unpleasant places to live. Before you move to some place that looks like a bargain, find out why it's so inexpensive and decide if you can live with the problem. Some problems you can live with, others you will regret. And think twice before moving into areas with crime or unpleasant neighbors. Retirement years are not the best time to try out the urban pioneer lifestyle. Sadly, thugs like to target seniors. You don't want to live some place where you are afraid to walk to the store.

4) Don't be quick to rule out places before exploring them--there are some wonderful communities out there in places you wouldn't expect. I've become a fan of Arkansas after having a friend move there. I would never have thought I'd like Arkansas so much if I hadn't gone out to visit him and seen what it was really like.
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Old 08-19-2012, 05:06 AM
 
1,464 posts, read 2,754,047 times
Reputation: 2817
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerby W-R View Post
California was ranked 50th last time I checked on places to retire.
As far as northern states go, if you can stand the cold I have heard
that Wyoming and Pennsylvania are good states to retire in. Also,
it is my understanding that Washington state is also good. New Mexico
intrigues me but I've heard there are some downsides to retiring there.
I am not a fan of humidity I know anywhere east of the Rockies will
get plenty of humidity. I could stand short summers if I had to with some
cold winters. That is why I included Pennsylvania. I Realize there are some southern
states that rank well as inexpensive retirement destinations but I just could not
endure the long hot humid days. Your replies are appreciated.
I am retired and live in Connecticut which is FAR from inexpensive but is convenient as far as where I have to go for medical issues. I know..sad but the truth be told as we get older, it not only becomes a question of affordability it is also a question of where we can get the best medical care possible. I had an upper thoracic aneurysm fixed about 3 years ago at Yale University Hospital in New Haven..outstanding care and great surgeons. Because it was such a sensitive surgery and the bovine valve I had to have put in will need replacing within the next 10-15 years, I am glad to be near New Haven. We are also not that far from UCONN Medical Center and Hartford Hospital all great places if needed. I am 64 so newly retired but do feel fortunate to be where I am.

As far as weather here?? It is all over the place. Right now on August 19th at 7:02 a.m. it is 53 degrees! Can you believe that one? Yesterday it was near 90 and later today will be 88 according to the weather reports. Does it get cold here? Yes it can, but hasn't the last few years. We do get LOTS of humidity but being lifelong residents have grown quite accustom to it.

Good luck with your search. Living expenses are so high for everyone now a days. Not so sure you can just base where you live on that alone. I think its bad everywhere from the price of gas to the cost of a loaf of bread, it is all out of control.
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Old 08-19-2012, 05:08 AM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
8,787 posts, read 7,707,284 times
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Cost of living is a big factor with me in retirement, as I don't have a big employer paid package at the end of my work days. I hear you saying low cost and low humidity. Wyoming would certainly be lower cost than Calif. and dry. Your best bet might be someplace like South Dakota. ITs still fairly dry around Rapid City. Utah also could be an excellent choice. If you don't like long humid summers, stay away from the southeast entirely. I'd suggest you look at lots of factors that can influence where you live. Crime, access to health care, potential allergy problems, and available activities are all factors that could influence whether you are happy with your retirement location decision.
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Old 08-19-2012, 05:42 AM
 
10,355 posts, read 9,382,296 times
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You're wise to solicit information from as many as you can and to ensure you take your time to find what works best for you.

I've considered relocating (have been in this area for 18 yrs and retired in 2011). Mainly I'd be looking for warmer winters, affordability, safety, and that the health insurance and medical professionals I require are available.

From my research over the last 5+ years, I've yet to narrow it down to a particular spot that will fit all of my needs...and may never find it. Concessions will have to be made: a list of Must Haves, Won't Haves, and Could Care Less About is necessary when making a decision.

Coming from SoCal, making the adjustment to 'weather' was a shock for me. All I knew of winter was what I saw on tv or in the movies, or what I'd heard from others. But until you experience a 'true' winter with the frigid temps, snow, ice, blizzards, you really have no idea what it's all about. Adjusted? Sure, because I did what I had to do, but I'd prefer a milder winter (like the one we had this last winter).
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Old 08-19-2012, 06:16 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,596 posts, read 39,974,527 times
Reputation: 23731
I can't enjoy humidity, so I'm in WA. (for last 30 yrs, I came from previous 25 yrs in CO and WY)
My longterm domicile will most likely be SD (very low domicile requirement (1 night / yr) and NO income tax)

I will be in different places, but income-tax-free states will be my territory for investment / earnings / domicile.

AK is probably the best, and MANY climates, but no San Diego type places.

WA has a benefit if you stay on the southern border (as I am). Oregon has no sales tax... 5 minute trip across the bridge. Personally, I'm hammered with property taxes, but you don't have to be. (last yr I bought arental that is 20 minutes from Portland Airport, in a National Scenic Area (park-like, VERY gorgeous) has 3 acres with barns, gardens, shiop and small home. Under $100k and less than $1000/yr taxes (I currently pay $12k+ and live 60 seconds away from this 'new' place)

HINT: Get to know the ASSESSOR / taxes BEFORE you buy. ANYWHERE.

Fair Taxes, nice weather, low humidity... my first choice would be Colorado (or a couple places in WY), BUT... as mentioned every place has issues. CO is being hammered with political pressure to become left leaning. The LEFTIES will win in Colorado, (high population centers) to the demise of the western roots / culture / representation of the interests of the entire state. (happened to both WA and OR)

UT, NM, ID should also be on your map. consider which places are running out of water...


I need an international airport and multiple colleges for culture offerings, thus SW WA (near Portland, OR, but on WA side) is pretty good for now. 285 days of drizzle is NOT good for me... but I have ways to escape.

White Salmon, WA (1 hr) is the closest you can get to Portland and have WA benefit + dry / decent weather. It is very beautiful there, very close to OUTDOOR recreation, but limited in offerings (housing / culture). Hood River OR is 5 min away (and $1 toll). It is VERY nice (and VERY spendy for retirees... OR taxes + high property costs)

I have a spreadsheet for retirement costs and priority (for me). WY lost out due to transportation costs, Colorado and WA tied.

Lowest taxes should only be a part of your 'calculation'. There are MANY choices for you. There are several CoL calculators, but tough to tailor for YOUR spending / tastes. FOOD is very affordable here (depending where you shop), Building a ZERO energy home is a good idea (anywhere you are SURE you will stay). I like to keep commute 'reasonable' (I'm in the boonies, but 5 minutes to Safeway)

Get out and check them out NOW (while property prices & interest rates are LOW.

I want to figure out how to spend some time in CA so I can attend a few universities (as a senior... FREE)
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Old 08-19-2012, 06:38 AM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,876,173 times
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Cost of living was definitely a factor along with other considerations many of them already mentioned.
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Old 08-19-2012, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Kenmore, WA
7,492 posts, read 6,477,559 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerby W-R View Post
I Realize there are some southern
states that rank well as inexpensive retirement destinations but I just could not
endure the long hot humid days. Your replies are appreciated.
We considered the cost of living of the locals in the 34 states we visited during our two-year quest for "Mayberry" ('08-'10) and came to the realization that one should choose their retirement based on the same criteria that they choose their pre-retirement locations. You are more than likely going to want to do most of the same things you enjoy doing as you are younger, modified somewhat by reduced physical capabilities.

We also discovered that when you examine the total cost of living (taxes, lifestyle choices, day-to-day costs) there isn't a lot of true variation within a given situation (similar style home, neighborhood, social amenities, etc).
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Old 08-19-2012, 08:21 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,492,863 times
Reputation: 29071
"Inexpensive" was merely one part of the equation. There were other desires just as important. We landed right where we wished to and almost coincidentally it's significantly less expensive than from whence we came.
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