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Thread summary:

Speed limit: intersection, seniors only apartments, homogenous society, assisted living center

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Old 06-11-2007, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,905 posts, read 25,364,805 times
Reputation: 26428

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Wow! Hostility. I don't know how to respond to that other than to say I love seniors. Even in my 20's, I was the one visiting at the nursing home. Worked in one when I was young too. I love older people. They are a living repository of all the world's knowledge. How can anyone not respect that?

I knew a man who walked and talked with Albert Einstein. I met a woman who still had the buffalo robe she slept under in the conestoga wagon that took them out west. I knew a lady whose dad died in the Civil War. She had one of the first successful brain surgeries done at the Mayo Clinic. Older people have so much to share. All you have to do is listen.
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Old 06-21-2007, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
1,610 posts, read 4,397,260 times
Reputation: 1459
I guess technically I could be considered "senior" but I'm the only one who'd better refer to myself that way. My husband and I are just about 2.5 years from retirement and I have very mixed feelings about that prospect. In reality the only reason I am anticipating the retirement is that I can finally move someplace of MY choosing, rather than living where my husband's job is. I know for sure that I want no part of a "seniors only" community - it ain't natural! Virtually all of our friends are younger than we are (I'm 61, my husband is 63) and we want to retain that mix of ages when we move. Also, both of us would like to work at something when we retire, just to have a reason to get up and get dressed every day and to have people appreciate your being there. I still work now and I should comment that I got my current job when I was 60 years old (I look much younger than my age and engineering companies don't give a da*n how old you are if you can do the job) and I still feel like I have something to give. My husband plans to teach wine classes when he retires and you sure don't have to be young to do that. Bottom line is that I can't think of anything more depressing/boring than surrounding myself with nothing but people only my own age.
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Old 06-25-2007, 06:48 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,712 posts, read 33,740,349 times
Reputation: 51977
Quote:
Originally Posted by soapboxsallysmom View Post
A curious thing happened today in Tampa. For the first time anywhere, a speed limit sign was erected cautioning people to Slow Down for Seniors. This sign appears at a busy intersection near a seniors only apartment complex.

I can hear you all groaning now, but it raises an interesting dilemma. We take care to protect children, but never think in the same way for seniors, the fraille kind. We hear plenty of jokes and complaints about how inconvenient it is to have them in our neighborhoods (not sure of the reasons yet), and other disparaging comments about old people. The irony of this is that if some of you are lucky, you might get to be a senior. If and when that happens, how would feel hearing the younger people on these pages refer to you as such a burden and annoyance.

My post is to get you to really think about your own attitude about seniors in your neighborhood, and if you happen to be a senior, do you prefer to be isolated from younger families or live among them in a homogenous society as we did many years ago. I'll add my opinion later on.

I'm looking forward to some sincere thoughts on this subject from the young as well as the older members.

Thanks.
I rent. I'm retired at 55. I prefer to live in an apartment building with working people, young kids are okay. The age of the neighbor isn't as important to me as the schedule. I like being someplace where people get up early (I still get up with the sun), sleep when I sleep, and are gone by the time I go out at 9AM. I get in, in the evening, and they are just starting to come home from work. For that reason, I would never rent in a college town --- students don't keep the same hours.
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Old 06-25-2007, 12:01 PM
 
942 posts, read 1,069,229 times
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I am moving into a 14 story highrise, that is for 55 and over residents. I had mixed feeling about it, but am doing it for this reason. It is in a area of Portland that has been developed from wharehouses to highend condos and apts, and businesses. So much of it has to be affordable housing, and that meant that someone 55 and over would pay a much lower rent than someone on the open rental market that has higher incomes. I am only renting an apt it is not a retirement community, when I leave my bldg I will be surrounded by much younger people, and there will be older people mixed in there amongst this population in this neighborhood. I wanted a mixed age neighborhood,where I could walk, or take transit everywhere, and drive only when I wanted to leave the city, and I think from visiting the area over and over I will like it, provided people are friendly to me. I do not want to just live around elderly people, especially those much older than me, I am 57. I do not think it is healthy to be around people of just one segment of the population, and that is why I chose this setting besides a nice apt for a lower rent payment, was the exposure to different age groups in my neighborhood.
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Old 08-14-2014, 02:23 PM
 
739 posts, read 1,612,810 times
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I don't think we would be happy living in a 55-plus community. We are both retired and live in a neighborhood with many other retirees but there are a few young families. My favorite thing is to decorate my house at Halloween and answer the door to all the wonderful children who are Trick-or-Treating. I am happy to listen to them race their bicycles up and down the street, shouting with laughter. I don't love sharing a swimming pool with too many of them, admittedly, but when I'm not in the pool it is fun to watch them play.

We all need to live together. That may mean making concessions, like slowing down for a kid on a skateboard or a senior crossing at a light using a walker. We need to pay taxes for the kids to have good schools and for the seniors to have a good, responsive ambulance service.

No man is an island. Somebody smart said that (John Donne?).
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Old 08-14-2014, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,769,401 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExNooYawk View Post
I don't think we would be happy living in a 55-plus community. We are both retired and live in a neighborhood with many other retirees but there are a few young families. My favorite thing is to decorate my house at Halloween and answer the door to all the wonderful children who are Trick-or-Treating. I am happy to listen to them race their bicycles up and down the street, shouting with laughter. I don't love sharing a swimming pool with too many of them, admittedly, but when I'm not in the pool it is fun to watch them play.

We all need to live together. That may mean making concessions, like slowing down for a kid on a skateboard or a senior crossing at a light using a walker. We need to pay taxes for the kids to have good schools and for the seniors to have a good, responsive ambulance service.

No man is an island. Somebody smart said that (John Donne?).
Yes, it was John Donne, who died almost 400 years ago.
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Old 08-14-2014, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,905 posts, read 25,364,805 times
Reputation: 26428
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
Wow! Hostility. I don't know how to respond to that other than to say I love seniors. Even in my 20's, I was the one visiting at the nursing home. Worked in one when I was young too. I love older people. They are a living repository of all the world's knowledge. How can anyone not respect that?

I knew a man who walked and talked with Albert Einstein. I met a woman who still had the buffalo robe she slept under in the conestoga wagon that took them out west. I knew a lady whose dad died in the Civil War. She had one of the first successful brain surgeries done at the Mayo Clinic. Older people have so much to share. All you have to do is listen.
This is what I posted back in 2007! And I still believe it!

As I've gotten older I still choose to avoid age restricted housing. I want to be part of the world, not apart from it. Still want to be in the middle of things! I think it would be quite dull to be around only one group of people all the time.
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Old 08-16-2014, 07:57 PM
 
Location: IE CA.
643 posts, read 2,236,518 times
Reputation: 242
I think elderly get ignoeed so ofren in young neighnorhoods. I would never want to feel so alone as that would make me feel. Besides you can have visitors in a 55 and up etc. And yoi won't have to wait for them not to come and help you. Your feiends or maintenance people can do it .
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Old 08-20-2014, 08:50 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,895 posts, read 54,615,351 times
Reputation: 31285
I hope we don't start seeing signs like this appearing in car windows.
Attached Thumbnails
Segregate or integrate, seniors are a fact of life.-aa1.jpg  
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Old 08-20-2014, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,769,401 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
I hope we don't start seeing signs like this appearing in car windows.
In many, if not most cases, the sign isn't necessary. The slow, uncertain driving and the white hair make the announcement loud and clear.
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