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Old 01-11-2013, 06:29 AM
 
26 posts, read 56,519 times
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I am planning for my retirement and want to move out of high stress and very expensive Rockville MD, just outside of Washington DC. The cost of living, especially housing, makes living in this area not so attractive for many retirees unless they have lots of money in their 401K.

Recently I have been checking out towns all over America that may be a good place to retire but find that many of them that are sold as being inexpensive are cheap for a reason. So many places where the cost of housing is low seem run down and tired.

Is it possible to find a place where the cost of housing is low but there is lots of college educated professionals and cultural opportunities and the quality of life usually found in high income areas? Plus the shopping and nice restaurants found in high income towns.

Help me find cheap but a very professional place.
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Old 01-11-2013, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,288 posts, read 17,963,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Very Curious View Post
I am planning for my retirement and want to move out of high stress and very expensive Rockville MD, just outside of Washington DC. The cost of living, especially housing, makes living in this area not so attractive for many retirees unless they have lots of money in their 401K.

Recently I have been checking out towns all over America that may be a good place to retire but find that many of them that are sold as being inexpensive are cheap for a reason. So many places where the cost of housing is low seem run down and tired.

Is it possible to find a place where the cost of housing is low but there is lots of college educated professionals and cultural opportunities and the quality of life usually found in high income areas? Plus the shopping and nice restaurants found in high income towns.

Help me find cheap but a very professional place.
I totally understand what you are saying....what kind of home are you looking for? How much do you want to spend? What amenities?
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Old 01-11-2013, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,525,560 times
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If you want the high income amenities then you are either going to have to live in a high COL area or outside of it and drive to the amenities.

Inexpensive areas are inexpensive for a reason.

If a high COL city is what you want though then start thinking about how far away from it you can live and still enjoy the amenities and start looking at those peripheral towns.
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Old 01-11-2013, 06:56 AM
 
26 posts, read 56,519 times
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Here is one area I looked at that seemed to have a mixture of a relatively low cost of living and good demographics: The Raleigh area. I looked at homes in Cary NC and found you could buy a house for $200,000 that was similar to the houses in my hometown of Rockville MD that would cost over $500,000. Plus the Raleigh area had a very high percentage of people who had college degrees. I don't want to be a snob but I have found that the towns with a high percentage of college graduates and people who worked in jobs that required advanced training or education had a better selection of shopping, great places to eat, cultural opportunities, libraries and good parks and schools, etc. The places that were cheap did not have any of these things.

Any ideas other than Raleigh?
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Old 01-11-2013, 07:15 AM
 
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Maybe:

Greenville, SC (near downtown or Clemson area).
Winston-Salem, NC
Nashville area
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Old 01-11-2013, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 26,917,465 times
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It all depends on your definition of "tacky", "inexpensive" and "cultural opportunities."

Off the top of my head, the rust belt cities might attract. Pittsburgh and Cleveland have art museums, symphonies, etc. that are holdovers from the era when those cities were hot. Yet, since so much employment left those towns, they now have relatively inexpensive housing. Are they run down? Depends on your definition.

Another one I think is a cool town is Los Alamos, NM. Since it's a one industry town (research lab), the entire population is highly educated. This town has a surprising number of cultural features for it's size. Housing was once expensive but became much more affordable after the lab let most of the people go. There are still people working there, though, as well as retirees from the golden days. Whether or not the town has now become mildly rundown is something for you to decide.
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Old 01-11-2013, 08:26 AM
 
Location: CHicago, United States
6,936 posts, read 7,261,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Very Curious View Post
Is it possible to find a place where the cost of housing is low but there is lots of college educated professionals and cultural opportunities and the quality of life usually found in high income areas? Plus the shopping and nice restaurants found in high income towns.

Help me find cheap but a very professional place.
There are several discussions about this topic. One which I started, about places costing less than $50,000. What you seek is available. The leg work is up to you. Have a look through prior discussions. Best of luck.
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Old 01-11-2013, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 26,917,465 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gomexico View Post
There are several discussions about this topic. One which I started, about places costing less than $50,000. What you seek is available. The leg work is up to you. Have a look through prior discussions. Best of luck.
Agreed--and when you find the place you're looking for, please tell us. We have lots and lots of people who like to say it's so easy to find places like this, but then they never return to tell us what they found. Just once I'd like to read something other than "it's possible and I'm gonna do it" and instead read "it's possible and here's how I did it."
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Old 01-11-2013, 08:52 AM
 
15,199 posts, read 31,159,793 times
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I think it is also subjective as to what one considers cultural amenities and good shopping, dining. etc. Also, weather.

However, the OP wanted a place with "lots of college educated professionals" and frankly, those folks tend to live in high-priced areas. There are always trade-offs.

I believe there are some good options in many states, especially like the midwest - Indianapolis comes to mind. Ball State is there, it's a good sized city, has quite a bit going for it and it is pretty inexpensive to live there.

Definitely one needs to make a list of their priorities and do a lot of research.
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Old 01-11-2013, 10:22 AM
 
Location: SoCal
6,069 posts, read 9,533,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsychic View Post
... However, the OP wanted a place with "lots of college educated professionals" and frankly, those folks tend to live in high-priced areas. There are always trade-offs. ... .
Or in college towns, which may or may not be inexpensive places to live. San Diego (UCSD) is expensive. Champaign/Urbana (ISU), not so much.
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