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Old 02-25-2013, 06:19 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
Reputation: 32304

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
The problem is, if someone calls a doctor on my behalf to have me admitted to a nursing home or assisted living facility, I hardly think they will agree to do so without getting a considerable sum of money i.e. running a battery of "tests" and at least a few office visits before doing so. No doctor is going to say "ok" without even knowing the condition of the person, and there is no way I am ever going to through any of that. I got blood taken about 16 years ago to get a life insurance policy and I swore that was the last time *ever*. EKGs, MRI, CAT scans, and whatever garbage they throw at you to "determine your physical health" is not even a consideration. So, I guess if I can find a doctor who will be willing to say... 'OK, here you go", when "prescribing" a nursing home, fine, but my thoughts are that this scenario is doubtful at best.
It seems to me your are saying that you simply reject the idea of receiving medical care because yes, any doctor with integrity is going to need to know what is wrong with us before he prescribes any treatment or medication, and that knowledge comes from tests as well as physical examination. What it is about having blood drawn that makes you say "never again"? I have blood drawn about twice a year to monitor certain things, and it is no big deal. Usually only small children are afraid and/or traumatized by such routine procedures.

Are you saying that if you fell and suspected that you have a broken bone, you would refuse to have it x-rayed? Why are such tests "not even a consideration"? It seems to me your stance is irrational in the extreme.
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Old 02-25-2013, 08:01 AM
 
8,184 posts, read 11,902,987 times
Reputation: 17949
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Are you saying that if you fell and suspected that you have a broken bone, you would refuse to have it x-rayed? Why are such tests "not even a consideration"? It seems to me your stance is irrational in the extreme.
You must not be familiar with Branson's philosophy. Medical professionals and pharmaceutical companies are the enemies of mankind and are just out to prey on you. In fact, they go out of their way to give advice to people that is contrary to their good health. They don't want to cure you of anything, they just want to keep treating you and keep you sick so that they can make money hand over fist. For example, did you know that all vaccines are just a scam that do absolutely nothing for you?

Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
This only goes to reinforce my opinion that vaccines do NO GOOD and much harm. If I had children, there is no way I would poison them with vaccines of any kind.
Apparently, there is not a disease known to man that can't be cured be eating a better diet and getting a rich, deep tan. The one thing you don't want to do is go to a doctor, get diagnosed with something that he just made up, and then spend money on prescription drugs that do you no good.
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Old 02-25-2013, 10:55 AM
 
735 posts, read 450,356 times
Reputation: 1716
I hope to break my neck falling off my horse at a full gallop on a fine day. No nursing home needed. R.N. will never stand for Retired Nurse.

I have seen these places, they are hidious, even the nice ones. To warehouse old people like stacked firewood....for profit!

In New Zealand do you know how they do? They have little places with clusters of tiny cottages. Each old person has their own little place. They grow gardens of flowers and nurses come check on them and look after them. I think they all go eat at a kitchen there.

Someday, I would like to buy an old Victorian house, make wheelchair ramps, ect, and have a sort of an old folks commune. Everybody kicks in what $ they can to support the house. The old ladies could snap beans on the porch, the old guys could go fishing or fix an old car in the driveway, or old guys could also snap beans and ladies could go fishing. Someone (like me for instance) could give out the medicine and give nursing care. Yea, eventually, people would get too old to get out of bed or too demented, but they could still have activities and stay engaged with the household. The younger old people coming to live there could help take care of the older old people. Thats part of the deal for when they thenselves get old and all stove up as we say in the country. This is how I myself would like to be treated. What do you all think?
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Old 02-25-2013, 01:07 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,847 posts, read 30,345,392 times
Reputation: 22356
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Are you saying that if you fell and suspected that you have a broken bone, you would refuse to have it x-rayed? Why are such tests "not even a consideration"? It seems to me your stance is irrational in the extreme.
I feel very confident about my ability to treat and handle virtually anything that comes along. Except in the most extreme cases such as snake bite, which I do not have the tools, nor the knowledge to treat, I'm pretty sure that I would not seek outside medical care. As for broken bones, it seems to me that people have been breaking bones long before doctors came along. I know how to set a fracture. Except for perhaps a broken neck or back or skull fracture, which are really the only three scenarios I can personally think of that I would not attempt to treat myself. Although, I have known people who have gone to doctors for each of these unfortunate injuries and really did not come out any better for it.

People have become so incredibly helpless with regard to their medical care. It's sad and funny at the same time. Statistically, there is a very small margin of diseases/disorders that people seek treatment for, upper respiratory infections (with complications such as ear infections, bronchitis, etc.), routine muscle sprains, the occasional broken bone, etc. Oh yes, I know people have heart attacks and burst aneurysm which may or may not kill you even with conventional medical care. It's a chance you take. I'd much rather take the chance that be shackled to some MD out of fear, and be prescribed medicine that is statistically more likely to kill me than the problem it is supposed to fix. More than 100,000 people died last year from medicines that they were PRESCRIBED. No thank you, I definitely don't want to be part of that club.

And I definitely don't want to be part of the Nursing Home crowd unless it's my idea.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 02-25-2013, 01:11 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,847 posts, read 30,345,392 times
Reputation: 22356
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nurse Bishop View Post
I hope to break my neck falling off my horse at a full gallop on a fine day. No nursing home needed. R.N. will never stand for Retired Nurse.

I have seen these places, they are hidious, even the nice ones. To warehouse old people like stacked firewood....for profit!

In New Zealand do you know how they do? They have little places with clusters of tiny cottages. Each old person has their own little place. They grow gardens of flowers and nurses come check on them and look after them. I think they all go eat at a kitchen there.

Someday, I would like to buy an old Victorian house, make wheelchair ramps, ect, and have a sort of an old folks commune. Everybody kicks in what $ they can to support the house. The old ladies could snap beans on the porch, the old guys could go fishing or fix an old car in the driveway, or old guys could also snap beans and ladies could go fishing. Someone (like me for instance) could give out the medicine and give nursing care. Yea, eventually, people would get too old to get out of bed or too demented, but they could still have activities and stay engaged with the household. The younger old people coming to live there could help take care of the older old people. Thats part of the deal for when they thenselves get old and all stove up as we say in the country. This is how I myself would like to be treated. What do you all think?
sounds great to me. Except I would post a big sign that says... Sorry, no grandchildren allowed. LOL

20yrsinBranson
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Old 02-25-2013, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
I feel very confident about my ability to treat and handle virtually anything that comes along. Except in the most extreme cases such as snake bite, which I do not have the tools, nor the knowledge to treat, I'm pretty sure that I would not seek outside medical care. As for broken bones, it seems to me that people have been breaking bones long before doctors came along. I know how to set a fracture. Except for perhaps a broken neck or back or skull fracture, which are really the only three scenarios I can personally think of that I would not attempt to treat myself. Although, I have known people who have gone to doctors for each of these unfortunate injuries and really did not come out any better for it.

People have become so incredibly helpless with regard to their medical care. It's sad and funny at the same time. Statistically, there is a very small margin of diseases/disorders that people seek treatment for, upper respiratory infections (with complications such as ear infections, bronchitis, etc.), routine muscle sprains, the occasional broken bone, etc. Oh yes, I know people have heart attacks and burst aneurysm which may or may not kill you even with conventional medical care. It's a chance you take. I'd much rather take the chance that be shackled to some MD out of fear, and be prescribed medicine that is statistically more likely to kill me than the problem it is supposed to fix. More than 100,000 people died last year from medicines that they were PRESCRIBED. No thank you, I definitely don't want to be part of that club.
I am curious if you believe that the Earth revolves around the sun or vice-versa.
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Old 02-25-2013, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,920,408 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
7. In 2000, 4.5 percent of Americans 65 years and older lived in nursing homes, a decline from 5.1 percent in 1990.

I find this most interesting, even though the stats are more than a decade old. The decline due to generally better health of older folks, or the avoidance of nursing homes due to cost, or more opting for home health aides?
Perhaps there were more younger seniors (people < 80) % wise in 2000? Most people in nursing homes are > 80 - not merely > 65. Robyn
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Old 02-25-2013, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,920,408 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by catsy girl View Post
the rental retirement communities i referenced in previous post have the monthly fees i've quoted; i've visited both several times,interviewed the admissions directors, stayed in one twice, and have a friend who has been a resident of one for five years. of course rates differ depending on the area you're in. the assisted living units attached to both have had excellent state reveiws, and yes, certainly i realize that is not the bottom line in evaluating a facility.

most people who choose a retirement community with levels of care are looking for security without the need for further changes. posters on this forum have often spoken of the desire to be settled and not to have to move again. most ccrcs, including the rental communities, give first preference for assisted living to their independent residents rather than those applying from the community,so a person coming from another facility may not have the access to their facility of choice when they needed it. also, unless a senior can depend on family or friends to investigate facilities, navigate paper work and visits, making changes from one facility to another would be difficult. for a person with beginning stages of dementia, it would be impossible. a person who is on their own to make these choices would, most probably, like to feel they are settled. that is, after all, the primary goal for many of entering a retirement community


catsy girl
I think perhaps the only constant in life is change . And the place that may be fine for someone who is 65-75 and relatively healthy may not work at all for someone who is 85 and infirm. And - as I've noted elsewhere - a younger senior who is ok in an independent living situation may have to move long distance to be closer to family at some point (even if the move is to an independent senior living facility). In my family - both my father and my FIL did this after their wives were dead (my father is in independent living - my FIL was in a SNF). As did one aunt and uncle (uncle had Alzheimer's - he wound up in an Alzheimer's place and aunt wound up in an apartment). And another aunt (a long time widow - she wound up in a SNF).

Note that I don't object to any rental that is appropriate for any particular person. In independent living places like those where my father and aunt live - the leases stipulate that you can terminate your lease on 30 days notice if you need a higher level of care than that provided in the place you're renting. So there is great flexibility. I only object to the CCRCs with big up-front buy-in fees. Robyn
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Old 02-25-2013, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,920,408 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
I am familiar with Medicaid, and you can't have $2000 a month income - perhaps it's $2000 pot for a lifetime, that I will look into. Yes, we made sure before we moved in that they would allow her to stay. We worked with a social worker (private) who called the ALF's, told them my Mom's financial situation, then went to see the ones the SW told us would allow her to remain. There were a couple that would have even allowed her to stay in her own apartment, but she hated one of them when we looked, and I heard bad things about the nursing care in one. This one is a great place, although she is going to be very unhappy with sharing when the time comes. I actually work in an ALF which is owned by a religious organization, and their residents have a fund that allows them to stay when they run out of money. My own mom was declined there however due to her age vs. her assets.

I really don't think I "dumped" on you, but I apologize if it came off that way to you.
Yes - I think I have perhaps confused assets with income. And I don't know what personal monthly spending limits are. But there probably are limits. There are 2 things I know for sure. That you don't have to have "nothing" to qualify for Medicaid. And that the rules vary from state to state. You may have to do a fair amount of paperwork to make sure you cross all the t's and dot all the i's when it comes to Medicaid income/spending/assets - but I don't think you will have to pay for everything out of your own pocket.

I've mentioned this website before here - but haven't in a long time:

BenefitsCheckUp.org

It's run by the National Council on Aging and is an excellent resource for figuring out your Mom's eligibility for various benefits she might need. Robyn
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Old 02-25-2013, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,920,408 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nurse Bishop View Post
I hope to break my neck falling off my horse at a full gallop on a fine day. No nursing home needed. R.N. will never stand for Retired Nurse.

I have seen these places, they are hidious, even the nice ones. To warehouse old people like stacked firewood....for profit!

In New Zealand do you know how they do? They have little places with clusters of tiny cottages. Each old person has their own little place. They grow gardens of flowers and nurses come check on them and look after them. I think they all go eat at a kitchen there.

Someday, I would like to buy an old Victorian house, make wheelchair ramps, ect, and have a sort of an old folks commune. Everybody kicks in what $ they can to support the house. The old ladies could snap beans on the porch, the old guys could go fishing or fix an old car in the driveway, or old guys could also snap beans and ladies could go fishing. Someone (like me for instance) could give out the medicine and give nursing care. Yea, eventually, people would get too old to get out of bed or too demented, but they could still have activities and stay engaged with the household. The younger old people coming to live there could help take care of the older old people. Thats part of the deal for when they thenselves get old and all stove up as we say in the country. This is how I myself would like to be treated. What do you all think?
Christopher Reeve broke his neck riding a horse. The aftermath wasn't particularly pleasant. Be careful what you wish for.

We've had previous discussions about the type of living situation you mentioned. The fly in the ointment is expecting junior seniors to spend what may be their last relatively healthy years being unpaid cooks - housekeepers - home handy people - or nursing home attendants (the last being particularly unpleasant - especially if dealing with people who are incontinent and/or suffering from dementia). IMO - you'd wind up with many more people demanding care than people willing to be caregivers. I don't know about anyone else - but I'm not willing to do stuff like this even for my father (although I would have to if he couldn't afford to pay for it). I sure don't wouldn't want to do it for any stranger. Robyn
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