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Old 02-22-2013, 05:21 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 26,913,849 times
Reputation: 42861

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Elder care goes ahead of 9 bazillion copies of 50 Shades of Gray in public libraries. And I think I should be paying more for my Medicare (because I can afford to pay more - as can many seniors).
LOL LOL you sure are focusing a lot of outrage on that book this week. Look at it this way--libraries get deals from publishers on paperbacks they buy in bulk. So even if they spend a couple hundred dollars buying copies of 50 Shades of Grey, it's a drop in the bucket compared to what is needed for elder care. Might buy enough medication for one person for one week. It's like thinking this country can solve the drought problem by getting everyone to put a dixie cup out to catching the morning dew. Even if you fill the cup, it's nowhere near enough to water a farmers field.

Getting back to the topic of nursing homes, it'll be interesting to see what happens in the next 20 years as this large group of seniors continues to age. I wish I had an answer, but beyond relying on family members, relying on insurance companies, or relying on society, I really don't. There are just too many unknowns as far as what will happen with medical costs, laws, politics, and even situations happening in other countries. Of the three I trust family and society to be the solution more than I trust insurance companies, but that's just how I feel today--life is full of life-changing events, and it would just take one or two to easily change how I see things today.

Last edited by Caladium; 02-22-2013 at 05:45 AM..
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Old 02-22-2013, 06:58 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,929,938 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post
Just curious if you sell insurance. How is it true that if 7% of folks over age 75 (see my links) live in nursing homes you say that 43% of us are going to spend 2.5 years in LTC? Folk I work with...Those who do rehab in LTC (90-95%) spend a month or two in LTC, which is under the 120 day limit for Medicare.

So what does your company charge for LTC insurance?
I'm a retired lawyer - and have never had anything to do with insurance sales in my whole life. But I have had family members who required long term care in a SNF.

What you see on the rehab side is very different than what you see on the long term care side. On the rehab side - you'll see lots of younger seniors who come in for rehab and go home. What you see on the long term care side is mostly older seniors who come in for long term care and stay until they die. The average age of long term care residents in my late FIL's SNF is over 85. And the average stay before death is 2.5 years. Of course - that 2.5 years masks a lot of variations (I've seen people come in and die in < month - and others who - at age 100+ - had been residents for a decade). Robyn
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Old 02-22-2013, 07:08 AM
 
Location: delaware
688 posts, read 864,549 times
Reputation: 2367
[quote=Robyn55;28355412]The "neighbors" thing isn't to be trusted IMO. Because when your neighbors have "issues" - they tend to disappear (frequently having to move to be near their children or other family members). I'm sure my late FIL's neighbors thought he was doing "great" in his 80's. Until he had a stroke - and we had to move him to a SNF near us where he spent the last years of his life. Robyn



i completely agree, based on working as a social worker in a long-term care facility for a number of years, and working as a geriatric care manager with families trying to put together a plan to keep mom, dad, grandmom functioning at home without totally surrendering their freedom to do so. also, i have at this stage of my life, a few friends who still have an elderly parent, one or two still at home. it is absolutely clear that, in spite of their parent continuing to seemingly function at home with some assistance- usually several visits a week- from adult children, all of these elderly folks- late 8o's to low 90's- have had to rely heavily on children close by for extended periods following falls, chemo treatments for breast cancer, recurrent treatment for chronic issues- to name a few, and they could not have survived "independently" without willing? family and/or money. neighbors might do some checking on for a time but heavy duty care for extended periods takes family who want to do it and/or can be guilted into it and/or money to pay for services.

catsy girl
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Old 02-22-2013, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Lexington, SC
4,281 posts, read 10,737,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
What a great original post. My father told me when I was a child that a person who has something for sale cannot be counted on to tell the truth about that product or service. I have never seriously considered purchasing long term care insurance because I do not consider it acceptable to live in a nursing home. That would not be "living" in my opinion, but would be death in life. I would find some way to end my life instead of acquiescing to live in a nursing home.

I agree.
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Old 02-22-2013, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Western Colorado
11,090 posts, read 12,473,002 times
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I believe a nursing home is where people go to die. I've told my family DO NOT put me in a nursing home. Put me in the woods, someplace, anyplace other than that. I've seen too many older family members go into one, and just give up on living. The costs are insane, the care isn't there. No thanks.
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Old 02-22-2013, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Europe
1,619 posts, read 1,275,977 times
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It is not only the elderly in nursing homes , sometimes adults with a stroke , accident , severe health issues etc are placed in a nursing home. Some time ago they filmed a man of 42 yrs and he was in a nursing home for the rest of his life after an accident he was total invalid from the neck down.He had family and friends and neighbours but no one wanted to care for him. So he ended up in a nursing home , he was the only young person there everyone else was older in their 70's 80's 90's.
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Old 02-22-2013, 12:52 PM
 
Location: delaware
688 posts, read 864,549 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jim9251 View Post
I believe a nursing home is where people go to die. I've told my family DO NOT put me in a nursing home. Put me in the woods, someplace, anyplace other than that. I've seen too many older family members go into one, and just give up on living. The costs are insane, the care isn't there. No thanks.


whatever you may think of nursing homes, it may not be the enviornment you choose , but the care is there. patients in nursing homes live longer, in most cases, than they would have lived otherwise, simply because patients are "sent out" to hospitals for the slightest change in condition. this has been discussed in this forum on other posts, but nursing homes are closely monitored, reviewed by the state, and from the standpoint of accountability, patients are routinely sent out to a hospital for even a slight change in a condition. today, nursing homes usually err on the side of too many patient hospital admissions rather than neglect.
as has been pointed out in previous posts, nursing home placements for the 65-mid seventies group are often short -term intensive rehab following a stroke, fracture, etc, with the patient returning home in 4-6 weeks. a friend of mine, age 69, had a stroke in december, and after hospitalization, spent two months in a nursing/rehab facility receiving intensive p.t., o.t., and speech therapy. the frequency and intensity of therapy was much more than medicare would have paid for her at home, and she credits her stay at this facility as bringing her back to the level where she could return home again and live alone.

i worked in a nursing home, my mother was a patient in a nursing home for several years; i know the downside of nursing homes, believe me. but in many cases, for rehab and for those long term care patients who have dementia , who are totally dependent on others for care - to mention a few cases- nursing homes, skilled care facilities- whatever you want to call them, serve a purpose, for the patient as well as the caregiver.

catsy girl
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Old 02-22-2013, 01:12 PM
 
797 posts, read 1,127,490 times
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It is easy for a healthy person to say -------------"I would never want to-----------"

You might change your mind after things happen to your health.

The will to survive is very strong.
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Old 02-22-2013, 03:54 PM
 
2,912 posts, read 3,549,656 times
Reputation: 4103
Quote:
Originally Posted by catsy girl View Post
whatever you may think of nursing homes, it may not be the enviornment you choose , but the care is there. patients in nursing homes live longer, in most cases, than they would have lived otherwise, simply because patients are "sent out" to hospitals for the slightest change in condition. this has been discussed in this forum on other posts, but nursing homes are closely monitored, reviewed by the state, and from the standpoint of accountability, patients are routinely sent out to a hospital for even a slight change in a condition. today, nursing homes usually err on the side of too many patient hospital admissions rather than neglect.
as has been pointed out in previous posts, nursing home placements for the 65-mid seventies group are often short -term intensive rehab following a stroke, fracture, etc, with the patient returning home in 4-6 weeks. a friend of mine, age 69, had a stroke in december, and after hospitalization, spent two months in a nursing/rehab facility receiving intensive p.t., o.t., and speech therapy. the frequency and intensity of therapy was much more than medicare would have paid for her at home, and she credits her stay at this facility as bringing her back to the level where she could return home again and live alone.

i worked in a nursing home, my mother was a patient in a nursing home for several years; i know the downside of nursing homes, believe me. but in many cases, for rehab and for those long term care patients who have dementia , who are totally dependent on others for care - to mention a few cases- nursing homes, skilled care facilities- whatever you want to call them, serve a purpose, for the patient as well as the caregiver.

catsy girl
catsy girl -- my observations agree with yours, completely. I'm encouraged to hear a professional say this. The main problem is that the homes are soooo expensive . . . . . .
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Old 02-22-2013, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,978,143 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by jim9251 View Post
I believe a nursing home is where people go to die. I've told my family DO NOT put me in a nursing home. Put me in the woods, someplace, anyplace other than that. I've seen too many older family members go into one, and just give up on living. The costs are insane, the care isn't there. No thanks.
If you go out into the woods, you just might regain your health and survive longer.

My DP says he will do the same thing, taking with him a small wood stove, his ax, a jacket and boots, a pot, some rice and beans, and our dogs (this will be after I kick off). He means it.
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