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Old 02-23-2013, 05:28 PM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,843,254 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huckleberry3911948 View Post
u could be right but i read the obituaries daily. that everybody lives to 85 is a fantasy.

I read the obituaries today too. I didn't see my name in there so I guess I will live another day.
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Old 02-23-2013, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,920,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huckleberry3911948 View Post
u could be right but i read the obituaries daily. that everybody lives to 85 is a fantasy.
You would be surprised. The smokers in the immediate family members of my parents' generation lived to 79/84/84/86. The obese person lived to 86. The drunk lived to 90. Everyone else is still alive at 90+. Robyn
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Old 02-23-2013, 05:32 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,644 posts, read 74,585,953 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
You would be surprised. The smokers in the immediate family members of my parents' generation lived to 79/84/84/86. The obese person lived to 86. The drunk lived to 90. Everyone else is still alive at 90+. Robyn
the drunk lived but not the people that he ran over. i know alota dead fat people.
they all died young. but americans dont like that kinda talk.
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Old 02-23-2013, 05:36 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,847 posts, read 30,345,392 times
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I looked into long term care insurance... "just in case". The problem is that long term care has to be prescribed by your doctor in order for the insurance company to cover it. Ain't gonna happen in my world.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 02-23-2013, 05:38 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,847 posts, read 30,345,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
You would be surprised. The smokers in the immediate family members of my parents' generation lived to 79/84/84/86. The obese person lived to 86. The drunk lived to 90. Everyone else is still alive at 90+. Robyn
Sounds like my family!

20yrsinBranson
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Old 02-23-2013, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,920,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huckleberry3911948 View Post
the drunk lived but not the people that he ran over. i know alota dead fat people.
they all died young. but americans dont like that kinda talk.
Actually - the drunk was a she - an aunt. And she had a rich son who made sure she always had a private driver (in NYC). And she was not the fat aunt - that was another aunt. Robyn
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Old 02-23-2013, 05:51 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
71,921 posts, read 83,566,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
You would be surprised. The smokers in the immediate family members of my parents' generation lived to 79/84/84/86. The obese person lived to 86. The drunk lived to 90. Everyone else is still alive at 90+. Robyn
gee it sounds like our family, minus the smokers, most either didin't smoke, quit or died of related illnesses pretty young. Both grandmas lived to be late 80s to early 90s and both were very over weight, dad, drank like a fish, died at 93, mother in law, wasn't heavy when she got older, but was for years, died at 97. I could go on and on. A lot of our life expectancy is controlled by heredity, no matter what the doctors or others would like us to believe.
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Old 02-23-2013, 05:59 PM
 
Location: delaware
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
There are many ways to skin a cat - catsy girl. When my late FIL first presented at his SNF - it was clear that if he ever became other than a rehab patient - he would be full private pay. He got a Medicare rehab bed in about 48 hours (perhaps it was luck of the draw - it's kind of first come - first served - but staying on the phone 24/7 doesn't hurt either). At his SNF (which I assume crosses all its t's and dots all its i's) - a patient in a Medicare rehab bed gets first dibs on a long term care bed - even if the Medicaid waiting list for long term care is 3 years long. IMO - people can ***** - moan - or complain to government agencies. But - in the long run - the people who are full pay will go to the front of the line. Because no SNF - except perhaps the worst of them - can afford to keep its doors open if > 50% of the residents are on Medicaid (because Medicaid doesn't pay what it costs to care for these residents - even on a breakeven basis). Robyn

i used to work with admissions in two of the facilities where i headed social work, and consequently, was involved with assessing patients who presented for admission. in some cases i went to their home or hospital to see them if there were more questions than paperwork could provide. in both facilities we turned down a private pay patient, one with serious mental problems and another with inter- personal behavior issues, primarily because he'd be sharing a room. if you are coming to snf from a hospital, it has never been that difficult to get a bed , as medicare will pay after 3 day hospital stay. when i worked in the field, some hospital patients, all medicare or in some cases- hmo- had a choice of nursing home. nursing homes in the area were competing for patients. it is always harder to get a placement directly from home as there is usually no medicare elegibility, and no third party- hospital case manager- assisting in placement. with medicaid there are the myriad of state forms needed to qualify, and long term beds are less available generally. with rehab, those beds are a revolving door with availability much more frequently.

as i've stated, skilled facilities have their own way of manipulating medicaid beds as many facilities- not all- will not accept medicaid from the community. they will need to transfer to medicaid after being a medicare or private pay patient. but yes, they can and do say they accept medicaid. and yes of course, robyn, medicaid doesn't pay what the cost of care is, and i'm certain there are some facilities that will bump medicaid for private pay. but, i didn't work at those facilities. in my years of doing this work, in social work with a foot in the admissions decision making, we took medicaid from the community, we didn't just put private in the one or two private rooms we had,and long term medicare in- patients who transitioned to medicaid had the first choice in bed availibility.

i last worked in this setting 14 years ago, so i can't speak for how it is now, or how it is in other states. was it always fair? of course i'm sure it wasn't; it, bottom line, is an industry. but the experience of your father in law was not something i saw in the facilities where i worked.

catsy girl
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Old 02-23-2013, 06:09 PM
 
29,764 posts, read 34,851,819 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catsy girl View Post
i have had, on a personal level, three relatives admitted to nursing facilities in balto. area over a period of the last 25 years. all came in with medicare and in two cases became long term with enough private pay to last 6 months-after that, medicaid. in my mother's case, she paid privately for a number of years and rec'd medicaid for last six months. my mil, who never has a nickel, entered a nursing home in virginia on medicaid.

some facilities which claim to take medicaid, and do, will find a reason to accept private pay and /or medicare, and than 6 or 7 months down the road when these funds are exhausted, will accept medicaid from these patients. but- the patient has to have the funds to pay up front.

assisted living facilities take only private pay or insurance and do not operate on the same basis as snf.


catsy girl
Yeah thats what I thought. I am familiar with the DC area and my comments are based in large part on things there. Since you were in the field I wanted to be sure. The DC area is one of different extremes. Poverty and wealth with a lot of fixed income retirement wealth and home equity. Lots of houses with a value of 150-200 K and up which with no mortgage will pay the entry or buy in what ever fee at a very nice facility and with there being so many folks with pensions and or SS etc lots of fixed monthly income folks who can afford to pay the monthly fee out of pocket for as long as they live. Requires decision making at retirement about keeping the equity in their home and maximizing the pension and SS benefits to assist the surviving spouse and or themselves. That can make taking SS at 70 a good option for one or both spouses. I even saw a continuing care place ( a nice one ) that is having a 25K off special right now.
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Old 02-23-2013, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,920,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
My question is for you and you would know. In Maryland are there differences in being able to get into facilitities ranging from continuing care up to nursing home based on wealth and income? Does everyone take or have to take Medicaid patients?
I don't know if you're especially interested in learning about this now (I actually am not). But "continuing care" isn't a medically recognized type of care - although there are continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) - which are a totally different animal (and I'd never ever spend 10 cents on them).

And - based on my very limited experiences in different states - you have independent senior living facilities - assisted living facilties - and skilled nursing facilities. Plus perhaps some state specific stuff like those Alzheimer's places I ran across in California.

Usually - the only type of facility that takes Medicaid is a skilled nursing facility. And there's no requirement that they do so.

Since you're in North Carolina - I will share this information with you. My late MIL and FIL both lived in North Carolina - in the Pinehurst area (they moved there from NJ when they retired). We didn't have much to say about my late MIL's care there - but I thought it was primitive when it came to things like nursing homes. Ditto with my late FIL's care there (no specifics - they're not fit for prime time audiences). Anyway - after my MIL died - and my FIL had a stroke - we moved him here to an excellent SNF in north Florida. At some point - it seemed like he might be ready for an ALF or similar - and he wanted to go back to NC. I called social services in his county - and got on the phone with a very nice intelligent woman (who was originally from NYC). Basically - she said - the places where my FIL came from suck** (not to put too fine a point on it). What she said became moot when my FIL developed other medical issues - but there are parts of NC (and I'm sure many other states as well) where health and elder care are really primitive.

I honestly think it's hard to generalize about SNFs - even classes of SNFs. For example - my late FIL (who wasn't Jewish) spent his last years in a Jewish non-profit SNF here. And we thought it was great. I have a cousin-in-law in Los Anegeles who thinks the Jewish SNF in Los Angeles is awful (can't vouch for her POV - but it just shows you can't generalize about these things). Robyn
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