U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-14-2013, 04:45 PM
 
34 posts, read 146,139 times
Reputation: 41

Advertisements

Hi,

I currently work for a major I/T company. I have worked there for 35 years. I will be retiring in December of this year just shy of my 58th birthday.

For the last 15 years of my career I have been in management positions with lots of responsibility and with lots of people depending on me to set business direction and all of the other typical things that go along with being in management. The job is extremely stressful and I can't wait to get out of the corporate rat race but I must admit that I am worried about feeling relevant after retirement. Even though I have come to hate my job and everything that it stands for, it does give me a place to go each day and it gives me a feeling of relevance and responsibility. Did anyone have this concern as they neared retirement and how did you deal with it?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-14-2013, 06:18 PM
 
596 posts, read 857,824 times
Reputation: 1181
A similar thing happened to me. I spent many years anxiously awaiting retirement, but at the end I enjoyed my job a lot more because it was almost over. It's a pretty intense feeling walking down that hallway for the last time after you've been at a place for a couple of decades. In my case I started a new career the day after I retired, so I had something to look forward to (but I was laid off/furloughed after a couple of months). After that I pursued some hobbies (e.g. martial arts) with extra vigor, did some volunteering, got another job that I enjoyed (I was laid off from that one after about a year), etc....Now roughly 5 years after retirement I'm kind of taking it easy, walking the dog, watching my teenager grow up, goin' to the gym, and so on.

The important thing is to have something to look forward to (a new job, learning something new, achieving a goal, etc.), especially in the beginning. For example, my wife & I are looking forward to downsizing to a condo and moving across the country when our kid is out of high school in a few years. Imo guys who retire and then have no reason to get up in the morning are the ones who are going to have the most trouble coping.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2013, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 18,711,518 times
Reputation: 32425
Lots of people share your concern, and the higher up they are/were, the greater the adjustment which has to be made. Getting over oneself is not always so easy. I would recommend the book "Younger Next Year" by Crowley and Lodge. Crowley is a retired big shot lawyer and Lodge is a practicing internist (M.D.). The book talks a lot about the benefits of exercise, but it also addresses exactly the issue raised in the original post here.

I can relate personally to the issue, even though I was quite low down on the societal totem pole (high school teacher). Even as a high school teacher, I had certain responsibilities and had to take the initiative in many ways, especially after I became the bilingual coordinator of the school where I worked. Even low status in society is above no status. As retirees, we have no status. But it can be liberating to accept that with good grace and to enjoy the freedom to pursue other things which may be less connected to earning money, or perhaps not connected at all to earning money.

Seriously, get a copy of "Younger Next Year".
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2013, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
35,768 posts, read 35,557,787 times
Reputation: 54912
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave56 View Post
Hi,

I currently work for a major I/T company. I have worked there for 35 years. I will be retiring in December of this year just shy of my 58th birthday.

For the last 15 years of my career I have been in management positions with lots of responsibility and with lots of people depending on me to set business direction and all of the other typical things that go along with being in management. The job is extremely stressful and I can't wait to get out of the corporate rat race but I must admit that I am worried about feeling relevant after retirement. Even though I have come to hate my job and everything that it stands for, it does give me a place to go each day and it gives me a feeling of relevance and responsibility. Did anyone have this concern as they neared retirement and how did you deal with it?
Join a club related to what you like to do. You will soon find yourself as the president of that club. Volunteer for some town events. You'll be running the event in a few short years. The people unwilling to manage/lead in the workforce are the same people that don't want those kind of responsibilities in retirement. It is my observation that the leaders in the work world eventually lead clubs and volunteer events and organizations.

You won't realize it at first but you will find yourself using the skills you used at work in retirement. If you were a planner or an organizer, you'll gravitate to doing that kind of thing in retirement. The people that planned the office parties are usually the ones planning the club's social events. If you dealt with the public at work, you will find yourself volunteering to do club activities, events or charity work where you have the job that deals directly with the public. If you did any kind of training or teaching, you will find yourself eagerly teaching or presenting something related to your hobby. If you were "the helper" you'll volunteer to assist the leader of your organization at events. If you were the "ideas guy" at work you will still be the one telling others better ways or new ways to do things. If you built stuff or set up stuff at work, you'll be the one building and setting up things for events.

Now about that boss thing...don't try it at home.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2013, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,068 posts, read 76,111,677 times
Reputation: 27635
Become a substitute teacher. I actually got certified to teach Math 4-8 before I retired. It gets a bit more pay.
That should bring some relevance into your life.

I enjoy it very much. It's a professional job yet without the hassle of planning, grading, administrative duties, etc.
I do tell the teachers to leave keys for me and I do grading for them on the work that day. They thank me for that and it has moved me into a 'favorite' position with some of them asking specifically for me and I have the Math teachers asking for me as well as they can leave lesson plans to be taught rather than just worksheets.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2013, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,068 posts, read 76,111,677 times
Reputation: 27635
Let me add..I know one retired person who has an H&R Block business. He has his busy season and then his down time and loves it. This year he rented one of those small residences turned into business places in the business section of town.
I dropped by to see him in January and congratulate him on his successful venture.

I met him last year at school. He's a retired teacher that was doing substitute teaching while building up his tax clients.
Looks like he's off and running on a second, part-time career preparing taxes.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2013, 06:00 AM
 
9 posts, read 40,322 times
Reputation: 26
Unhappy Making the most of pre-retirement

Quote:
Originally Posted by dave56 View Post
Hi,

I currently work for a major I/T company. I have worked there for 35 years. I will be retiring in December of this year just shy of my 58th birthday.

For the last 15 years of my career I have been in management positions with lots of responsibility and with lots of people depending on me to set business direction and all of the other typical things that go along with being in management. The job is extremely stressful and I can't wait to get out of the corporate rat race but I must admit that I am worried about feeling relevant after retirement. Even though I have come to hate my job and everything that it stands for, it does give me a place to go each day and it gives me a feeling of relevance and responsibility. Did anyone have this concern as they neared retirement and how did you deal with it?
To the contributor:
I, too, am working for a major I/T company, having worked there for 29 years and will be retiring soon. My career has paralleled yours and I can only encourage you to start doing something, as soon as possible. Eventually, something will solidify and give you direction. A friend of mine once told me that the first 6 months of retirement from this company are for getting your head cleared of all of the nonsense from 20+ years. Then the second 6 months are spent researching and deciding on post-retirement activities. Finally, the last 6 months are usually spent training for (and I use that term loosely) and finding and sorting out the opportunities for post-retirement activities. I know that this is easier said than done, but it's a start at some structure.

As an aside, in my current place of work, years ago it was not unusual for retired employees to dies 18-24 months after retiring. This information was backed up with an article that someone sent me stating the same thing in more eloquent terms based upon high-tech employees of a large aerospace manufacturer.

"The pension funds in many large corporations (e.g., Boeing, Lockheed Martin, AT&T, Lucent Technologies, etc.) have been “Over Funded” because many “late retirees” who keep-on working into their old age and retire late after the age of 65 tend to die within two years after their retirements. In other words, many of these late retirees do not live long enough to collect all their fair shares of pension money such that they leave a lot of extra-unused money in the pension funds resulting in the over-funded pension funds." (Optimum Strategies for Creativity and Longevity, By Sing Lin, Ph.D., 2002).

Furthermore, for the high-tech industry, the age at which one retires is as important to lifespan after retirement as is anything else that we do and that the "ideal" retirement age for this industry is 55. Their actuarial study was a real eye opener. See the table below:

Table 1 – Actuarial Study of life span vs. age at retirement.

Age at Retirement Average Age At Death
49.9 86
51.2 85.3
52.5 84.6
53.8 83.9
55.1 83.2 ***
56.4 82.5
57.2 81.4
58.3 80
59.2 78.5
60.1 76.8
61 74.5
62.1 71.8
63.1 69.3
64.1 67.9
65.2 66.8

The conclusions of the report are startling and disturbing for those of us who must work as long as possible because of a "degraded" 401(K) due to the economy or other reasons.

"However, when you get older, you should plan your career path and financial matter so that you can retire comfortably at the age of 55 or earlier to enjoy your long, happy and leisure retirement life into your golden age of 80s and beyond. In retirement, you can still enjoy some fun work of great interest to you and of great values to the society and the community, but at a part-time leisure pace on your own term.

On the other hand, if you are not able to get out of the pressure-cooker or the high-speed battleground at the age of 55 and “have” to keep on working very hard until the age of 65 or older before your retirement, then you probably will die within 18 months of retirement. By working very hard in the pressure cooker for 10 more years beyond the age of 55, you give up at least 20 years of your life span on average."

If there are others who have information more recent than 2002, I'd appreciate reading it.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2013, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
4,085 posts, read 4,580,575 times
Reputation: 7557
Quote:
Originally Posted by slipton306 View Post

As an aside, in my current place of work, years ago it was not unusual for retired employees to dies 18-24 months after retiring. This information was backed up with an article that someone sent me stating the same thing in more eloquent terms based upon high-tech employees of a large aerospace manufacturer.

"The pension funds in many large corporations (e.g., Boeing, Lockheed Martin, AT&T, Lucent Technologies, etc.) have been “Over Funded” because many “late retirees” who keep-on working into their old age and retire late after the age of 65 tend to die within two years after their retirements. In other words, many of these late retirees do not live long enough to collect all their fair shares of pension money such that they leave a lot of extra-unused money in the pension funds resulting in the over-funded pension funds." (Optimum Strategies for Creativity and Longevity, By Sing Lin, Ph.D., 2002).

Furthermore, for the high-tech industry, the age at which one retires is as important to lifespan after retirement as is anything else that we do and that the "ideal" retirement age for this industry is 55. Their actuarial study was a real eye opener. See the table below:

Table 1 – Actuarial Study of life span vs. age at retirement.

Age at Retirement Average Age At Death
49.9 86
51.2 85.3
52.5 84.6
53.8 83.9
55.1 83.2 ***
56.4 82.5
57.2 81.4
58.3 80
59.2 78.5
60.1 76.8
61 74.5
62.1 71.8
63.1 69.3
64.1 67.9
65.2 66.8

The conclusions of the report are startling and disturbing for those of us who must work as long as possible because of a "degraded" 401(K) due to the economy or other reasons.

"However, when you get older, you should plan your career path and financial matter so that you can retire comfortably at the age of 55 or earlier to enjoy your long, happy and leisure retirement life into your golden age of 80s and beyond. In retirement, you can still enjoy some fun work of great interest to you and of great values to the society and the community, but at a part-time leisure pace on your own term.

On the other hand, if you are not able to get out of the pressure-cooker or the high-speed battleground at the age of 55 and “have” to keep on working very hard until the age of 65 or older before your retirement, then you probably will die within 18 months of retirement. By working very hard in the pressure cooker for 10 more years beyond the age of 55, you give up at least 20 years of your life span on average."

If there are others who have information more recent than 2002, I'd appreciate reading it.
Nonsense.
Retiring early means a longer life - an urban myth? :: squareCircleZ
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2013, 07:18 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
26,166 posts, read 43,931,167 times
Reputation: 29670
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave56 View Post
Hi,

I currently work for a major I/T company. I have worked there for 35 years. I will be retiring in December of this year just shy of my 58th birthday.

... The job is extremely stressful and I can't wait to get out of the corporate rat race but I must admit that ...a feeling of relevance and responsibility. Did anyone have this concern as they neared retirement and how did you deal with it?
Join the crowd (as been said above and probably many times). We each deal with it differently, those who I respect for making a good transition are often ex-military, very structured at work, BUT... when they retire, they have a very happy and fulfilling life purposely making each day count. Some are into recreation, others family, others volunteering, and a few working PT jobs. Some just plain have a BLAST.

The most stressed manager I knew who had to dismantle and lay off over 500 dear employees from 30+ yrs employment / building an excellent factory... Didn't tell a soul he was retiring. He had 3 months vacation booked, and 3months from his 55th B-day he was GONE and Never came or looked back. He and family moved away to a nice location to do elder care, then on to another location to be near kids. Both partners are engaged with helping young married couples in military adjust and mature. They are very happy and doing a great work, in spite of significant health concerns and fragile health. They go strong and know when to rest. He still stays in touch with many of his ex employees on a personal basis, and NEVER has said a word about work. Life is BIGGER than work. learn to embrace it. (now, in preparation for GREAT opportunities to come)
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2013, 07:25 AM
 
11,181 posts, read 10,234,675 times
Reputation: 17200
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave56 View Post
Hi,

I currently work for a major I/T company. I have worked there for 35 years. I will be retiring in December of this year just shy of my 58th birthday.

For the last 15 years of my career I have been in management positions with lots of responsibility and with lots of people depending on me to set business direction and all of the other typical things that go along with being in management. The job is extremely stressful and I can't wait to get out of the corporate rat race but I must admit that I am worried about feeling relevant after retirement. Even though I have come to hate my job and everything that it stands for, it does give me a place to go each day and it gives me a feeling of relevance and responsibility. Did anyone have this concern as they neared retirement and how did you deal with it?
Sounds like you're just not ready to retire; if you're burned out at your current job, perhaps a change of pace/career would be better for you than just not working at all.

Majority of the retirees I come in contact with are ecstatic about not having to get up and go to work and instead are able to pick and choose what they do each day. Have yet to meet one who claims they are sorry they retired.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top