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Old 05-30-2008, 03:10 PM
 
2,317 posts, read 4,641,179 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
Wine is very tricky.

I have done a little wine. Beer tends to be much easier, and a good place to learn the 'lab' skills.

We are making a lot of vinegar now days.
Yes,and from what I understand the beer is ready in 2 weeks,I made some red wine It won't be ready for 6 mos,the wine is sooner,but I will give the beer a shot
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Old 05-31-2008, 10:24 PM
GLS GLS started this thread
 
1,985 posts, read 4,850,035 times
Reputation: 2408
Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
Wine is very tricky.

I have done a little wine. Beer tends to be much easier, and a good place to learn the 'lab' skills.

We are making a lot of vinegar now days.
Somehow when I started this thread I knew the real answer to my question would be the decision on whether to make my own wine or my own beer.
With the proper dosing of either medication I won't worry so much about how much money I need to retire on.
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Old 06-01-2008, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,704 posts, read 49,495,894 times
Reputation: 19151
Quote:
Originally Posted by GLS View Post
Somehow when I started this thread I knew the real answer to my question would be the decision on whether to make my own wine or my own beer.
With the proper dosing of either medication I won't worry so much about how much money I need to retire on.
I was recently told that I am 'cheap'.

On the topic of financing your retirement though, anything that you can enjoy, and do for yourself, and lower your cost-of-living; why not?

Even from making beer with a 'kit' using Molson syrups, you are spending less money than buying beer. As you read about beer, and begin to play with recipes, your costs will drop. It is a neat hobby, and you can learn a lot about chemistry and biology. When you eventually get to buying a 50# sack of barley and another of hops; you will see that you will have gotten to the point where a beer is costing you pennies.

It is 'on topic'.

I have a friend who enjoyed making beer and wine so much that he planted a vineyard, just for himself. You don't get much 'cheaper' than that.
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Old 06-01-2008, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
7,119 posts, read 8,167,139 times
Reputation: 18775
Quote:
Originally Posted by GLS View Post
Somehow when I started this thread I knew the real answer to my question would be the decision on whether to make my own wine or my own beer.
With the proper dosing of either medication I won't worry so much about how much money I need to retire on.
Forest is right! We all tend to agonize over whether we will be able to retire and live on what seems to be a meager pension. Some folks agonize so much about it that they (literally) never retire.

But look at what this man (forest) is doing: raising chickens, raising goats, raising hogs (at least one, that I heard of), planting fruit trees, planting a garden, building his own house, and probably a dozen other things that he never writes about.

Is he "retired"? Some people would say, no - he still works too hard! But he loves what he's doing, and that makes all the difference in the world. He seems to be relaxed and happy. I don't think he needs the beer and wine to make him this way - that's just something else he does for enjoyment! I hope to be so lucky!
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Old 06-01-2008, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,704 posts, read 49,495,894 times
Reputation: 19151
I was very fortunate to have chosen a career field which had the benefit of a 20 year pension. So I have been able to go on pension while I still have a recent memory of youth. Combined with marrying an accountant, who oversaw our investments during my career.

We learned a lot from "The Millionaire Next door". Many families in America are focusing themselves on building their Net worth. Thousands are gaining affluence each year.

Primarily not through increasing your salary, rather from controlling expenses.

If you do not pay out 30% of your income to taxes, then you have given yourself a huge take-home raise.

If none of my salary goes to paying for my family's house [we have rental income which has always paid for our homes], then I have effectively increased my take-home salary. As compared to a major portion of our society where folks are paying out 50% of their income for housing. Because I choose to buy apartment buildings and live in them.

Today my pension is about equal to flipping burgers fulltime. I bought some acreage, we are turning it into a farm, while I build our house. We are mortgage free and enjoying retirement.
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Old 06-01-2008, 01:48 PM
GLS GLS started this thread
 
1,985 posts, read 4,850,035 times
Reputation: 2408
Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
I was recently told that I am 'cheap'.

On the topic of financing your retirement though, anything that you can enjoy, and do for yourself, and lower your cost-of-living; why not?

Even from making beer with a 'kit' using Molson syrups, you are spending less money than buying beer. As you read about beer, and begin to play with recipes, your costs will drop. It is a neat hobby, and you can learn a lot about chemistry and biology. When you eventually get to buying a 50# sack of barley and another of hops; you will see that you will have gotten to the point where a beer is costing you pennies.

It is 'on topic'.

I have a friend who enjoyed making beer and wine so much that he planted a vineyard, just for himself. You don't get much 'cheaper' than that.
I didn't mean to imply any criticism. I respectfully lift my glass (NOTE: I have BOTH wine glasses and beer steins) in a toast to the frugality of a Walden's Pond existence that promotes inner harmony.

PS I live smack dab in the middle of 40 wineries around me that still offer FREE wine tasting and complementary home-made snacks. In the spirit of "cheap", I visit them often.
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Old 06-01-2008, 02:15 PM
 
8,080 posts, read 13,475,624 times
Reputation: 10322
I read this thread everyday and I am learning alot.
My husband and I are both farm/nature nuts who are like a fish
out of water living in the city. We have needed to be where
we are for reasons that are unimportant but in 2 years
we will be free to move anywhere.
We think we want to live on 10 - 20 acres in the foothills of the Smokey Mts and garden & raise animals and enjoy a simple life.
Since I can remember I have felt called to the woods & nature & animals &
simple things like watching shooting stars away from the city lights!!
There is Native American blood in me from my great grandmother
so is it possible I got my love of nature and animals from her??

We are trying to decide if we can afford to retire in 2 years when we would first be able to move and this thread is very helpful. If we
move and live "cheap", grow vegetables and raise a few animals,
and are willing to work part time also I really think we could be ready in 2 years.

That is an exciting possibility.
We are in our early 50's
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Old 06-01-2008, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,704 posts, read 49,495,894 times
Reputation: 19151
Quote:
Originally Posted by kelly237 View Post
I read this thread everyday and I am learning alot. My husband and I are both farm/nature nuts who are like a fish
out of water living in the city. We have needed to be where we are for reasons that are unimportant but in 2 years we will be free to move anywhere. We think we want to live on 10 - 20 acres in the foothills of the Smokey Mts and garden & raise animals and enjoy a simple life.
Since I can remember I have felt called to the woods & nature & animals &
simple things like watching shooting stars away from the city lights!!
There is Native American blood in me from my great grandmother
so is it possible I got my love of nature and animals from her??

We are trying to decide if we can afford to retire in 2 years when we would first be able to move and this thread is very helpful. If we
move and live "cheap", grow vegetables and raise a few animals,
and are willing to work part time also I really think we could be ready in 2 years.

That is an exciting possibility. We are in our early 50's
That is really exciting. There are many forums where other folks who are also making the 'break' from urban life can discuss their issues.

Life in the big city tends to include much higher income also. I would humbly suggest that you seriously consider buying that rural homestead now while you still have the higher income. Pay it off, before you adjust to the lower Gross Incomes that you will see once you get there.
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Old 06-01-2008, 06:06 PM
 
8,080 posts, read 13,475,624 times
Reputation: 10322
Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
That is really exciting. There are many forums where other folks who are also making the 'break' from urban life can discuss their issues.

Life in the big city tends to include much higher income also. I would humbly suggest that you seriously consider buying that rural homestead now while you still have the higher income. Pay it off, before you adjust to the lower Gross Incomes that you will see once you get there.

Good idea... My husband wants too, thinking prices will go up and I
have been hesitant because we have been so undecided about where
we wanted to settle. A part of me wants to travel the country for a year then find our land.
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Old 06-01-2008, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,704 posts, read 49,495,894 times
Reputation: 19151
Quote:
Originally Posted by kelly237 View Post
Good idea... My husband wants too, thinking prices will go up and I have been hesitant because we have been so undecided about where we wanted to settle. A part of me wants to travel the country for a year then find our land.
Buying land once your broke is, well, difficult.

I cashed out a large chunk of our investment portfolio to purchase our land and begin building our house.

Today I would be hard pressed to do that again.

Our portfolio is growing again obviously, but it will take many years to get back up high enough to be able to afford buying another farm.

I truly think that it might be wiser to get the land now.
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