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Old 06-15-2008, 06:30 AM
 
Location: home...finally, home .
8,236 posts, read 18,519,100 times
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I agree with you Sal. I think it would be far better to forego the Obama "world poverty tax" that the house and senate are working on that would tax each American family $8 grand, and help our own for a change.

Wait. What's this $8000 world poverty tax?!?!?

(I know that this post should be in the Politics & other Controversies. Would you mind if I move it?)
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Old 06-15-2008, 08:07 AM
 
13,773 posts, read 33,916,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
Same here. I don't know but here is what I take into consideration: state tax structure (do they tax SS income?); property taxes (important if you don't rent); will doctors in the area accept new Medicare patients?

These are all important factors on a fixed income.

It might be very tough in the US on $2000 a month. You may want to look into Panama where the COL and health care cost is lower.

Good luck to us both!
I agree, you can't live on 2K in many places. I guess I just found my little slice of heaven. My property taxes are $175 a year, no state income tax on SS or my pension, HOI is reasonable.

Panama, well I lived in Panama years ago. I have checked into housing there and IMHO it isn't that cheap. It use to be much cheaper to buy a house until retirees started moving there. Appliances, furniture and autos all cost more due to taxes/duty on these. Cheaper housing is far away from major medical hospitals from what I saw online. Housing in Boquette or El Valle would be my first choice because they are in the mountains and cooler. You would be further away from stores and the beach though.
Don't get me wrong, I liked living there but it has drawbacks.
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Old 06-15-2008, 08:15 AM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 12,053,898 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nancy thereader View Post
I agree with you Sal. I think it would be far better to forego the Obama "world poverty tax" that the house and senate are working on that would tax each American family $8 grand, and help our own for a change.

Wait. What's this $8000 world poverty tax?!?!?

(I know that this post should be in the Politics & other Controversies. Would you mind if I move it?)
I wondered about that too, but then figured it was more hyperbole meant to slant the political leanings to fear. The rest of this thread belongs here in retirement, tho.
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Old 06-15-2008, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Atlanta suburb
4,728 posts, read 9,089,117 times
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I don't know about other retirees, but one thing that rankles me I would be happy to share.

We have worked hard all our adult years, put money into pensions, many of which have disappeared and now we are left us with the task of starting a 401K and other retirement savings at age 45 yrs. old.

On top of that, now that the economy is in the tanker and SS is threatened, we have to sacrifice being near family and friends to find a cheap place to retire. Not a nice home close to our children, grandchildren or siblings, but someplace where we won't be searching in the neighbors mulch heap for lunch.

I don't know what the solution is or how it can be unbroke, but there is something very wrong here that nuclear families have to be further deteriorated because Granma and Granpop can't afford to live where the old homestead is. I'd like to be close to family in my later years.

Has anyone considered that there will be no one to visit us in a nursing home someday or put flowers at our headstones? They will all living someplace else far away.
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Old 06-16-2008, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,687 posts, read 49,462,974 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gemkeeper View Post
I don't know about other retirees, but one thing that rankles me I would be happy to share.

We have worked hard all our adult years, put money into pensions, many of which have disappeared and now we are left us with the task of starting a 401K and other retirement savings at age 45 yrs. old.

On top of that, now that the economy is in the tanker and SS is threatened, we have to sacrifice being near family and friends to find a cheap place to retire. Not a nice home close to our children, grandchildren or siblings, but someplace where we won't be searching in the neighbors mulch heap for lunch.

I don't know what the solution is or how it can be unbroke, but there is something very wrong here that nuclear families have to be further deteriorated because Granma and Granpop can't afford to live where the old homestead is. I'd like to be close to family in my later years.

Has anyone considered that there will be no one to visit us in a nursing home someday or put flowers at our headstones? They will all living someplace else far away.
The old homestead that you mention; how many generations has it been paid off?

As a family homestead with no debt, it should be producing food to feed a few families, is it not feeding your siblings? your grandchildren? and your neighbors?
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Old 06-16-2008, 10:12 AM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 12,053,898 times
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Who among us actually has an old family homestead anymore? Isn't the more usual thing for families to move to the 4 ends of the earth for job opportunities?

I know in my family, the old homestead was obliterated long ago to make room for a freeway offramp.

I heard a talk recently about whether the energy crisis and increases would change that trend to making families stay more physically close because of the impediment of travel.
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Old 06-16-2008, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,687 posts, read 49,462,974 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tesaje View Post
Who among us actually has an old family homestead anymore? Isn't the more usual thing for families to move to the 4 ends of the earth for job opportunities?

I know in my family, the old homestead was obliterated long ago to make room for a freeway offramp.

I heard a talk recently about whether the energy crisis and increases would change that trend to making families stay more physically close because of the impediment of travel.
Both sets of my grandparents' lost their family farms during the dust-bowl / Great Depression. One grandfather lost a second farm to Eminent Domain in the 1970s, to a housing tract developer.

Part of our 'retirement goal' was to buy farm land mortgage-free, and to begin producing our food and fuel once again for ourselves.

Our eldest son just moved back in with us last week, as he has been hard 'hit' by our current economics. So I can see where the idea of drawing families together does have some merit.

Perhaps such would be a good idea for others?
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Old 06-16-2008, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Atlanta suburb
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Red face I should have been more specific. Sorry.

I'm sorry. I was using the term "homestead" very loosely. The family farm on both sides of my family were gone after WW2, sadly. But, all of the extended family from both sides continue to live in that area where I grew up in PA.

I have 47 first cousins and 2 siblings. Only I and 2 cousins have left the area and the remaining cousins' children and grandchildren have all remained in N. PA, as well. And, why not? It's lovely, relatively inexpensive to live there (3 cousins are farmers and quite self-sufficient and sharing), most of the family is within 30 minutes of one another. It's our history, who we are.

It's just the 2 cousins and myself who went off to college, met the mates of our dreams, and then proceeded to spend 30 years being transferred all over the country with jobs, who are not in the old home town - and probably will not return.

It is sad reflection of our progressive society that we love our children to pieces, watch them grow, send them to college and forever more, mourn that they will not be back.

I would return if my DH was of like mind. He hates the snow, the cold, the hustle-bustle of the NE, the pitted highways. All the things that I probably treasure the most and could write a book about. The interesting, funny, poignant, and thriftful living "back home" are exactly the things that he doesn't wish to return to.

I am determined, however, to subsist as much as possible on my own labors with the least amount of disruption of our environment as possible. This will not only insure me that I will live as cheaply as possible while still having everything that I want or need, and leaving this world with only my single footprint left in the dust.

I applaud your fine efforts, forest beekeeper, and do hope that those who cannot follow your path entirely will do what they can to adopt as many of your living standards, methods of subsisting off the land, and your concern for our earth and prosterity as possible. You have left your mark already!
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Old 06-16-2008, 04:37 PM
 
13,321 posts, read 25,569,771 times
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I wonder if my situation is more the future than armies of cousins, etc., from one's origins.
No family homestead. I'm second-generation American. My parents had a suburban 1/4 acre + house that they lost to my father's financial shennanigans.
I moved to Boston for no good reason, some 300 miles from relatives. I have one sister (estranged) and she has two grown sons who have no grandparents and were abandoned by their father. They have no cousins, and I'm the only aunt, and I am a lousy relative. One of them lives 3,000 miles away.
I expect, if I need "help," to pay for it- move to assisted living or an Erickson community of something. I don't intend to have a headstone, as I believe in cremation and a sort of zen-attitude of letting it go... My father will be cremated in a V.A. cemetary (his only desire being to have a Jewish star on his marker- they're flat stones, not a head stone).
I believe in living lightly and passing through, and one's connections will be what one makes of them. Family is a genetic blind date. You can choose who else you are important to, or what you're involved in.
After all, most people are forgotten when those who know them pass on. That's OK. We're little specks on a very old planet.
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Old 06-16-2008, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Atlanta suburb
4,728 posts, read 9,089,117 times
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Brightdoglover, much of what you say resonates with me, as well, in spite of the large family. A large family is of little consequence if you are not physically connected any longer.

I heard a news blip about dear Tim Russert, a man I greatly admired. He told of walking down a city street as a 10 yr. old with his father, a devout Catholic. They were just chatting about baseball, what was for dinner, that sort of thing.

When they came to the Catholic church they attended in Buffalo, there were quite a few people going inside for a funeral service. Tim's dad said "Let's just stand here for a bit". He asked Tim what time it was on his watch. Tim said that it was 11:25, and why did his dad need to know. His father said he was just wondering.

They continued to stand on the sidewalk outside of the church when the soon the people there for the funeral began to leave the church. Tim's father asked what time it was now. Tim replied that it was 11:50.

His father said to always remember that you might live 75 or 80 years, but when your life was over, it took only 25 minutes to sum up who a person was and what he did with his life. If it was going to be a 25 minute summation, be sure that whatever you did was going to make a memorable, fine 25 minute memorial to your life.

I was very touched by that story and I think that is what all of our lives boil down to. Be sure that whatever we do with this life, remember that at the end there will only be a 25 minute summation. May those minutes be full of very good memories.

I'm afraid that got a little off-topic; I apologize. But, sometimes we are more concerned with the cash than with the prize. I think we can all live on a lot less than we would imagine and still leave behind us, not necessarily a boon for our descendents, but some pretty wonderful memories and legacies.
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