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Old 03-14-2014, 11:16 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,574 posts, read 28,298,967 times
Reputation: 28457

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...that is the question.

More and more it seems that retirees here have moved to a country other than the U.S. or contemplate it, really want to do it or are absolutely planning to. I'm sure their reasons for it are as varied and individual as are others' for staying-put or retiring somewhere in the country other than where they lived and worked.

I've always been curious about how they feel after making the move to another country. Do they ever miss America? Are they glad and relieved to be elsewhere? Do they contemplate returning? What was the primary impetus that caused them to leave it in the first place.

From a personal perspective, I love my country, served it for years in the military and have always been very patriotic. At the same time I have grown increasingly disappointed in it on a number of levels. Yet despite those letdowns I never contemplated leaving it in retirement. Having spent years living in three other countries, and while I enjoyed the experiences (well, most of them), it was always nice to come home to the "good ol' USofA!"

So expats, wanna-bes, maybe-bes and soon-to-bes, what say you?
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Old 03-14-2014, 12:34 PM
 
Location: West Texas Town
160 posts, read 159,487 times
Reputation: 362
I fancy myself an expat wannabe and have researched it somewhat over the last 10 years. I have visited several countries looking for my "El Dorado" and have narrowed it down to 2 or 3. Even though I haunt the Retirement forum I am still working. My current job has lasted far longer than I ever imagined and may still run a few years but I think I will likely be mid 50's and have to decide if I want to seek other work or take a shot at early retirement. The best way I see now for an early retirement is expatting (sp) to a lower cost of living country. I see it as only a temporary move though. I love my country, it has been good to me and I fantasize about a life abroad ending in Sun City, AZ with me riding around in a golf cart in my very old age.
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Old 03-14-2014, 04:33 PM
 
Location: OH>IL>CO>CT
4,087 posts, read 6,229,798 times
Reputation: 5291
Not to rain on anyone's parade, but have the "wannbe" expats studied all the income tax issues related to being a US citizen in a foreign country ? And why more and more current expats are renouncing their US citizenship, mainly due to the onerous tax rules that apply ?? Not to mention things like Social Security, Medicare, banking, etc.

If you are not aware of the issues,here are a couple places to start reading:
Home :: American Citizens Abroad (ACA)
AARO - Association of Americans Resident Overseas

Read and heed......
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Old 03-14-2014, 05:38 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,574 posts, read 28,298,967 times
Reputation: 28457
Quote:
Originally Posted by reed303 View Post
Not to rain on anyone's parade, but have the "wannbe" expats studied all the income tax issues related to being a US citizen in a foreign country ? And why more and more current expats are renouncing their US citizenship, mainly due to the onerous tax rules that apply ?? Not to mention things like Social Security, Medicare, banking, etc.

If you are not aware of the issues,here are a couple places to start reading:
Home :: American Citizens Abroad (ACA)
AARO - Association of Americans Resident Overseas

Read and heed......
Back in the dark ages, Americans couldn't hold dual-citizenship. Then that was changed. But I, for one, would never water-down or renounce my citizenship for any reason. Of course, that's just me but I doubt that I'm alone in that. What was worth fighting for in my early 20s is still worth retaining in my late 60s.
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Old 03-14-2014, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Washington State
11,925 posts, read 6,036,450 times
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For many, it's a good option. Especially if you're up for a new adventure.
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Old 03-14-2014, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Toronto, Ottawa Valley & Dunedin FL
1,406 posts, read 2,092,420 times
Reputation: 1133
Being an expat rarely involves a change of citizenship.

And for many, it can be a parttime thing, like being a snowbird.

Having now visited Thailand, I can see the allure. Met expat Brits this trip, to South Africa and Portugal--the latter underlining the language issue--with whom are you going to have intelligent conversation? Old age is no time to become fluent in a new language.
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Old 03-14-2014, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Miraflores
655 posts, read 706,154 times
Reputation: 1169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Back in the dark ages, Americans couldn't hold dual-citizenship. Then that was changed. But I, for one, would never water-down or renounce my citizenship for any reason. Of course, that's just me but I doubt that I'm alone in that. What was worth fighting for in my early 20s is still worth retaining in my late 60s.
I can see where this is going and I will take a pass.
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Old 03-14-2014, 10:33 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,574 posts, read 28,298,967 times
Reputation: 28457
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpineprince View Post
I can see where this is going and I will take a pass.
It's only going to go where people who respond go. I've expressed my reasons for not expatriating myself after actually having strongly considered it for quite awhile not all that many years ago. For awhile my wife really pushed the idea. Ultimately I realized that I just couldn't do it. That's no reflection on anyone else's reasons for following a different path and no harm or foul for having done so. I've always said that we should all retire where we feel we'll be happiest and that is a very personal decision. What I really find interesting, sometimes fascinating, is why people choose to go where they do out of all the places they could.
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Old 03-15-2014, 02:34 AM
Status: " Wubba lubba dub dub!" (set 6 days ago)
 
10,533 posts, read 17,838,527 times
Reputation: 15623
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Back in the dark ages, Americans couldn't hold dual-citizenship. Then that was changed. But I, for one, would never water-down or renounce my citizenship for any reason. Of course, that's just me but I doubt that I'm alone in that. What was worth fighting for in my early 20s is still worth retaining in my late 60s.
It's my understanding you have to have a close relative that was born elsewhere to get dual citizenship. Pretty much leaves me out. My family has been here for many generations -- most branches pre-Revolutionary War...

One exception -- my grandfather. And I know for a fact, he will come back from the beyond if I try to get dual citizenship for Germany.
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Old 03-15-2014, 03:24 AM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,307 posts, read 11,083,514 times
Reputation: 7998
I think I'd be overwhelmed by the task of learning a new language (I tried recently with German) and a new culture. Though on second thought, I never really learned this culture too well.

Little things like toilets would bother me. I'd hate to throw my used tissue into a wastebasket, or squat over a hole in the ground. And who knows what kind of exotic parasites are taken for granted in some of those heathen climes.
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