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Old 04-11-2014, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Sinkholeville
1,496 posts, read 1,432,202 times
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So, I guess a houseboat would break all 5 rules?
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Old 04-11-2014, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Arizona
5,948 posts, read 5,305,279 times
Reputation: 17967
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuteTheMall View Post
Why did they ignore cost of living, crime, demographics, air quality, climate, and zero in on larger bathrooms?

Small bathrooms are just as safe, more to grab onto.
What about when you need a health aide when you can no longer bathe yourself? A small bathroom is useless when you get old. Try to get an old person up when they fall in a small bath. I know of times when they had to hook up a sling to raise them when they couldn't get around him.

The things you listed in your first sentence are assumed.
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Old 04-11-2014, 10:31 AM
 
Location: McLean, VA
790 posts, read 1,611,219 times
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I'm sure everyone could add something to the list....but here's one that I think takes the cake:

ABILITY TO SELL/RESELL THE PROPERTY

I read a great article on the "one question no home buyer ever asks but should always be able to answer." And that question was...."Can I sell this place?" At some point, we'll all sell. It might be your spouse, saddled with an off-the-grid/over the top/out of the way property...when he/she really needs the money. Or it could be you...in a situation you never thought would happen but now you need to move.

Can you sell it?
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Old 04-11-2014, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,848,939 times
Reputation: 6379
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuteTheMall View Post
Why did they ignore cost of living, crime, demographics, air quality, climate, and zero in on larger bathrooms?

Small bathrooms are just as safe, more to grab onto.
I agree small bathrooms are unsafe. I went back to the original article and it mentions to have space, meaning size is key here. Also to be able to add in safety features like grab bars.

As for the location that would include all of those as one poster here said that would balloon the article out to an unmanagable size.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jghorton View Post
I agree! Far too many of these 'news' articles are just common-sense space-fillers and don't really offer anything new. The suggestion that "Location" automatically encompasses all of the highly important issues you mentioned, is not supported by either the article or the OP. All in all, the article is a relatively weak piece of fluff, designed only to draw folks to the associated advertising.
Yes there are a lot of those articles for best place to move to. I think this one though focuses on things that are not just fluff as you say. I dont think it a weak piece but yes it is about the advertising for the publisher. The writer doesn't promote the ads and probably didnt know they were in the page until it was published. To say it is weak though is counter to what I read. I found that the writer had some excellent points.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuteTheMall View Post
So, I guess a houseboat would break all 5 rules?
I am not sure that it would break the rules. First it did say location. Will the boat be in the middle of the Atlantic? Most likely it will be on a river so transportation will be answered as well. It doesnt say you have to have friends. It just mentions that you have to be in a place where you can do what you like to do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thinkalot View Post
What about when you need a health aide when you can no longer bathe yourself? A small bathroom is useless when you get old. Try to get an old person up when they fall in a small bath. I know of times when they had to hook up a sling to raise them when they couldn't get around him.

The things you listed in your first sentence are assumed.
I completely agree there. What happens if you need a health aide. The article does mention that in how you have your bathroom.

I again think that someone misinterpreted the wording and then people assumed stuff. I could be wrong but so far I can only see good information from the piece.
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Old 04-11-2014, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,740,386 times
Reputation: 32304
Default Another view - a minority view

I realize I am in a minority here, perhaps even a minority of one. My attitude is simply different in that I don't wish to acquiesce in the thought that (for example) I might be confined to a wheelchair someday. Before you say "denial!", let me explain.

I am not in denial it could happen to me, because I know it could happen to anybody. What I am saying is for me, being confined to a wheelchair would be quite literally a fate worse than death. At that point I would be reading the book "Final Exit" muy pronto. Death is our common fate - not a single one of us will escape it. But being in a wheelchair (just to continue with that particular example to represent various kinds of things) is for me not living but is death in life, and as such I refuse to plan for it.

My retirement townhouse, the one I've been living in for 13 years now, is on four levels if you count the garage. The top level is the loft, which I use for storage and don't go to very often. But I am continually going between the other three levels without giving it a second thought. I plan to continue being able to do that by remaining active. Again, I am not in denial - I could lose that ability tomorrow in a car accident, for example, or ten years from now from various medical causes. What I'm saying is I find the concept UNACCEPTABLE.
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Old 04-11-2014, 02:12 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
2,172 posts, read 2,084,322 times
Reputation: 2599
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I realize I am in a minority here, perhaps even a minority of one. My attitude is simply different in that I don't wish to acquiesce in the thought that (for example) I might be confined to a wheelchair someday. Before you say "denial!", let me explain.
There is at least one other that shares that view (well, 2 if you include my wife).

I recognize we could end up infirm someday, but don't not plan to sacrifice our dreams for what may happen sometime down the road. Hopefully we are fortunate enough that we can continue to be active for the next 20 years (which would put me at 80, and my wife at 71). If something happens and we need to reassess our living situation, so be it. The value of living those first years the way we want to will have been well worth it.

I guess another way of putting it is that we aren't going to let what might happen to us in the last 5 or 10 years of our life totally dominate our decisions about how we live the early years of retirement. We've given it some consideration, but within the boundaries of the life we want to have and the environment we want to live in.

More than anything, I've concluded retirement is a process that begins when you retire, but will change over time. This is especially true with the increasing life expectancies many of us will enjoy.

Dave
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Old 04-11-2014, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,515,954 times
Reputation: 27565
I agree with the above 2 posters. I'm not planning my demise with my current home.
I'm enjoying what I can enjoy now..45 acres in a rural setting with livestock.

When the time comes to change I will.
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Old 04-11-2014, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,978,143 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cnynrat View Post
There is at least one other that shares that view (well, 2 if you include my wife).

I recognize we could end up infirm someday, but don't not plan to sacrifice our dreams for what may happen sometime down the road. Hopefully we are fortunate enough that we can continue to be active for the next 20 years (which would put me at 80, and my wife at 71). If something happens and we need to reassess our living situation, so be it. The value of living those first years the way we want to will have been well worth it.

I guess another way of putting it is that we aren't going to let what might happen to us in the last 5 or 10 years of our life totally dominate our decisions about how we live the early years of retirement. We've given it some consideration, but within the boundaries of the life we want to have and the environment we want to live in.

More than anything, I've concluded retirement is a process that begins when you retire, but will change over time. This is especially true with the increasing life expectancies many of us will enjoy.

Dave
While I understand what you are saying, for many retirees choosing this route it is to their families that the burdens fall when you are too old or infirm to drive, to get to appts, to take care of your property. I know too many retirees here who have take that route (live for today, live where we want) and their adult kids or other kin have to pick up the pieces when health or activity level deteriorates. Of course if you have the means to pay for all kinds of help as you age, that's a different story.
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Old 04-11-2014, 06:02 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
2,172 posts, read 2,084,322 times
Reputation: 2599
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
While I understand what you are saying, for many retirees choosing this route it is to their families that the burdens fall when you are too old or infirm to drive, to get to appts, to take care of your property. I know too many retirees here who have take that route (live for today, live where we want) and their adult kids or other kin have to pick up the pieces when health or activity level deteriorates. Of course if you have the means to pay for all kinds of help as you age, that's a different story.
First, we're fortunate to be in a position where we anticipate being relatively secure financially in retirement. Not extremely wealthy mind you, but with enough resources to take care of ourselves.

Second, I think the subtlety you may be missing is that I acknowledge that circumstances may drive us to make changes down the road. If that happens, so be it. We are not going to enter retirement in our early 60's/50's planning for that worst case outcome. If it happens, we'll make adjustments down the road.

And BTW, no kids to burden.
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Old 04-11-2014, 06:04 PM
 
2,575 posts, read 4,691,430 times
Reputation: 6378
Quote:
Originally Posted by StressedOutNYer View Post
jghorton, you are so right --- just like those "Best/Worst Places to Retire" lists that keep turning up like a bad penny, LOL
My town (Port Townsend, WA) pops up on tons of those "Best Places to Retire" type lists, but frankly, it wouldn't work at all for some people for a variety of reasons, while for others, it's great. But the funniest example of how worthless those lists are is one it was listed on a couple years ago, "Best Place to Live on the Water." Another entrant was Duluth, MN. Minnesota is a wonderful place in a lot of ways, but living on the water at 20 below zero in the winter isn't my idea of a contender for best place to do anything except freeze. Those lists are more funny than useful.
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