U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-11-2014, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,623 posts, read 9,696,398 times
Reputation: 11007

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by StressedOutNYer View Post
If a two-story house (or even a single-story house where the garage is in the basement) is considered, then the cost of a stairlift should be factored in. I recently priced a Savaria model for a straight stair (no turns or landings) and it was in the ballpark of $8000 installed.

Narrow bathroom doors are unfortunately common. :-( But the width of the bedroom-area hallway needs to be considered as well, because of the turning radius that has to be considered for a wheelchair. The scooter-type devices are easier in this regard but not everyone will have that option.

Another issue is the configuration of the washer & dryer. I see a lot of them being stacked and put into a recess or alcove, or in a former powder room. That's fine unless you're in a wheelchair; so, an alternate location for a side-by-side placement should be scouted out in advance.
When my parents built their last home they built a two story. I couldn't figure that one out since they were both pushing 70s. Eventually they bought a stairlift because my dad just couldn't get up and down them anymore. He passed away ten years ago and my mom still has that stairlift in storage. She's tried to sell it but very few people have two story homes here and the ones who do don't need it. I think it cost them about $8,000 back then. I loved that thing. It was great for getting laundry up and down the stairs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-11-2014, 07:56 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,205,825 times
Reputation: 22375
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZDesertBrat View Post
When my parents built their last home they built a two story. I couldn't figure that one out since they were both pushing 70s. Eventually they bought a stairlift because my dad just couldn't get up and down them anymore. He passed away ten years ago and my mom still has that stairlift in storage. She's tried to sell it but very few people have two story homes here and the ones who do don't need it. I think it cost them about $8,000 back then. I loved that thing. It was great for getting laundry up and down the stairs.
You can get used ones for pennies on the dollar (looked at one for $650 this past month) . . . but the problem is with getting someone to install it and then there is the problem with getting someone to do repairs. If you aren't the original owner, it appears (from what I have researched) to be nearly impossible to get help with installation and repairs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2014, 08:05 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,205,825 times
Reputation: 22375
Universal Design was an area of study I undertook with my nursing home administrator's licensure back in the 90s.

Here is a Universal Design checklist -- something worthwhile for anyone to spend some time thinking about. Small things, such as lever doorknobs, can be very helpful for folks as they age in place.

A Checklist for Universal Design and Livable Homes
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2014, 09:10 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,213 posts, read 1,354,565 times
Reputation: 6378
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuteTheMall View Post
and zero in on larger bathrooms?

Small bathrooms are just as safe, more to grab onto.
How would you manage a wheelchair or walker in a small bathroom? Also, shower is better than tub when you get older because it gets harder to climb over the tub wall.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2014, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,756,785 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
Also, shower is better than tub when you get older because it gets harder to climb over the tub wall.
The issue of climbing over the tub wall came up in at least one other thread; I posted then that I didn't understand how that could be difficult, and despite receiving some replies I still don't get it. There must be some medical conditions which make it hard to climb into a tub - can you tell me what some of them are to satisfy my curiosity?

Are you saying that large numbers of people refuse to maintain their ability to do normal things by not doing workouts which become essential at our age (I am 70)? Shouldn't we all be doing weighted workouts which include balance exercises? One-legged squats are great: You stand on one foot and bend that knee to go up and down slightly. It is great for balance and for toning the musculature which supports the knee. If you can't balance you start out by keeping the non-weight bearing foot touching the ground out in front of you (with the toe contacting the ground). Pretty much every gym has classes featuring hand-held weights, and people can start with as little as they need - one pound weights or I've even seen some older people doing all the motions with no weights at all. These weighted work-outs, sometimes called resistance training, are absolutely essential once we reach the age of about 60. In a rational world they would be considered as essential as brushing one's teeth for all older people. If that were the case, difficulties climbing into and out of a tub would be rare indeed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2014, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,339,474 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuteTheMall View Post
Why did they ignore cost of living, crime, demographics, air quality, climate, and zero in on larger bathrooms?

Small bathrooms are just as safe, more to grab onto.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jghorton View Post
I agree! Far too many of these 'news' articles are just common-sense space-fillers and don't really offer anything new. The suggestion that "Location" automatically encompasses all of the highly important issues you mentioned, is not supported by either the article or the OP. All in all, the article is a relatively weak piece of fluff, designed only to draw folks to the associated advertising.
This article is from Forbes and isn't aimed at retirees who won't be able to afford an upper/upper middle-class retirement income when they retire. Most retirees have to compromise, sometimes quite seriously.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2014, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,339,474 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
The issue of climbing over the tub wall came up in at least one other thread; I posted then that I didn't understand how that could be difficult, and despite receiving some replies I still don't get it. There must be some medical conditions which make it hard to climb into a tub - can you tell me what some of them are to satisfy my curiosity?

Are you saying that large numbers of people refuse to maintain their ability to do normal things by not doing workouts which become essential at our age (I am 70)? Shouldn't we all be doing weighted workouts which include balance exercises? One-legged squats are great: You stand on one foot and bend that knee to go up and down slightly. It is great for balance and for toning the musculature which supports the knee. If you can't balance you start out by keeping the non-weight bearing foot touching the ground out in front of you (with the toe contacting the ground). Pretty much every gym has classes featuring hand-held weights, and people can start with as little as they need - one pound weights or I've even seen some older people doing all the motions with no weights at all. These weighted work-outs, sometimes called resistance training, are absolutely essential once we reach the age of about 60. In a rational world they would be considered as essential as brushing one's teeth for all older people. If that were the case, difficulties climbing into and out of a tub would be rare indeed.
Bad knees and arthritis as well as vertigo can make climbing over the tub wall difficult/painful/dangerous. I speak from experience because I live with a bad knee (usually just stiff, sometimes painful).

I'm planning to enlarge my bathroom to include a walk-in shower just for that reason. I would just replace the tub with a shower if I had another bathroom with a tub, but the bathroom is too small anyways, and expanding it will add to the home's resale value.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2014, 11:52 PM
 
14,266 posts, read 24,016,895 times
Reputation: 20100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
The issue of climbing over the tub wall came up in at least one other thread; I posted then that I didn't understand how that could be difficult, and despite receiving some replies I still don't get it. There must be some medical conditions which make it hard to climb into a tub - can you tell me what some of them are to satisfy my curiosity?

I had surgery on my leg which made it very difficult to get into a tub. I had to lift my bad leg using my hand or get help to get my bad leg into the tub. I decided it was a lot easier to just use the walk-in shower instead.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2014, 07:42 AM
 
6,307 posts, read 4,755,565 times
Reputation: 12919
Well here we go again. Another article written by a barely 20 something just getting out of college. No knowledge, no experience, no research. Just crank out another article that does not say anything.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2014, 09:12 AM
 
5,399 posts, read 6,545,752 times
Reputation: 10477
Thanks for the checklist Ani. Will take it with me when I house look.

Adding on to the point of having at least one level outside egress point, I am thinking a carport, outside parking of some sort might be worthwhile since you would have to maneuver the wheel chair around to use in the specially designed batmobile.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top