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Old 04-13-2014, 09:16 AM
 
5,400 posts, read 6,552,332 times
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thanks golfingduo for posting. These seem like common sense things but there are depths to each point. Zoning had not been high on my radar but it makes sense especially if you establish a sense of community in the area.
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Old 04-13-2014, 12:12 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,915 posts, read 18,921,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
The issue of climbing over the tub wall came up in at least one other thread; I posted then that I didn't understand how that could be difficult, and despite receiving some replies I still don't get it. There must be some medical conditions which make it hard to climb into a tub - can you tell me what some of them are to satisfy my curiosity?

Are you saying that large numbers of people refuse to maintain their ability to do normal things by not doing workouts which become essential at our age (I am 70)? Shouldn't we all be doing weighted workouts which include balance exercises? One-legged squats are great: You stand on one foot and bend that knee to go up and down slightly. It is great for balance and for toning the musculature which supports the knee. If you can't balance you start out by keeping the non-weight bearing foot touching the ground out in front of you (with the toe contacting the ground). Pretty much every gym has classes featuring hand-held weights, and people can start with as little as they need - one pound weights or I've even seen some older people doing all the motions with no weights at all. These weighted work-outs, sometimes called resistance training, are absolutely essential once we reach the age of about 60. In a rational world they would be considered as essential as brushing one's teeth for all older people. If that were the case, difficulties climbing into and out of a tub would be rare indeed.
I go along with this to some degree. I haven't been exercising enough, mostly due to being confined to the house because of winter weather. I couldn't even get the car out of the ice and snow to go to the Y.

But I've signed up for physical therapy to get some exercises that will give me more strength and better balance. I also need to get special exercises for my knee due to a car accident because I'm afraid if I don't strengthen it, arthritis could set in. I don't want a shower instead of a bathtub. I love my long hot baths.

But even though I am trying to get stronger, there will probably come a time when I won't do baths. I can well understand how some leg surgery or general weakness could make it impossible. There will probably be another small house or apartment after this one, I acknowledge that. Probably at that point I could get along without a bathtub, something I could never deal with right now.
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Old 04-13-2014, 02:52 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,235,178 times
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Both my hubby and one of my close friends have some degree of neuropathy (legs) and can barely lift their legs -- sometimes, to even walk. Getting into bed can be a real challenge.

Neither of them can lift their legs high enough to climb into a tub. It is often very hard for them to get up from a chair. If they were to sit on the side of the tub and then swing around, that is still no solution, as they would have to lift their legs to even do it that way.

I know for those who haven't dealt with this type of impairment or been close to someone who is impaired, it is very hard to imagine not being able to lift one's legs enough to step over the side of a tub, or to lift legs up to get into bed.

This type of problem cannot be helped by exercise nor could it have been prevented.

Range of motion for folks with knee replacements can often be increased enough through physical therapy to make it possible to step up and over a tub, but that is a very individual situation, too.
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Old 04-13-2014, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,007,999 times
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When cruising real estate listings online, with an eye to our next (final) home, the first thing I start with is the exterior, bearing in mind we don't plan to hire help (this is a personal list, not for everyone).

- no more than .15 .18 acre behind the house (that's enough for us for a garden)

- siding that does not need painting or regular staining

- small (short) front yard

- short driveway

- no fencing that needs to be maintained

- simple landscaping. I don't care how lovely the place, if there's many (or any) shrubs to trim and shape and they can't be removed without making the front look bare, the home is off the list (some houses would require at least a PT gardener)

- how many stairs up to the front entrance - many a nice home has you hiking up a bunch of stairs (ok now, but in 10 years?)

- how many windows? is there a glassed in front porch, for ex, that's going to mean a lot of window washing

- if the roof isn't new or almost new, what is the size of it? they are pricey to replace - roof has to last our lifetime.

- how busy is the street/road onto which you have to emerge daily?


If the exterior passes the test, only then do I look at the online pics indoors.
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Old 04-13-2014, 09:16 PM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,442 posts, read 1,680,623 times
Reputation: 8726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
The issue of climbing over the tub wall came up in at least one other thread; I posted then that I didn't understand how that could be difficult, and despite receiving some replies I still don't get it. There must be some medical conditions which make it hard to climb into a tub - can you tell me what some of them are to satisfy my curiosity?

Are you saying that large numbers of people refuse to maintain their ability to do normal things by not doing workouts which become essential at our age (I am 70)? Shouldn't we all be doing weighted workouts which include balance exercises? One-legged squats are great: You stand on one foot and bend that knee to go up and down slightly. It is great for balance and for toning the musculature which supports the knee. If you can't balance you start out by keeping the non-weight bearing foot touching the ground out in front of you (with the toe contacting the ground). Pretty much every gym has classes featuring hand-held weights, and people can start with as little as they need - one pound weights or I've even seen some older people doing all the motions with no weights at all. These weighted work-outs, sometimes called resistance training, are absolutely essential once we reach the age of about 60. In a rational world they would be considered as essential as brushing one's teeth for all older people. If that were the case, difficulties climbing into and out of a tub would be rare indeed.
While working with patients for MRI/CT, I quickly learned people forget how to do normal things if they aren't done on a regular basis. Laying on the stomach is one of those things. People could not figure out how to do it. Most would opt for sitting, then laying down and rolling onto their stomachs, but they couldn't get their arm out from under. The entire process confounded them and I would assist them. This happened with some middle aged people and then more often with the elderly.

For myself, we lived with an old cast iron tub for years and finally added plumbing for a shower with it 10 years ago. I got home late from work one night and took a shower before going to bed. Probably from being overtired, my one foot caught on the edge of the tub when I was getting out and I fell out of the tub onto the floor, twisting my knee. Being an MRI technologist, I had an MRI the next day and I had a bone bruise but no fracture, it took a long time to heal.

I wouldn't recommend a high sided tub for seniors, all it takes is one fall or slip and with the possibility of a broken hip and rehab in a nursing home and fingers crossed that you make it back out. Why play with odds that may be stacked against you?

Being in good shape and with good balance doesn't prevent a moments inattention with a resulting injury. Each passing year will increase the likelihood of not recovering as easily from those injuries.

Last edited by jean_ji; 04-13-2014 at 09:50 PM..
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Old 04-14-2014, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,860,228 times
Reputation: 6379
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
When cruising real estate listings online, with an eye to our next (final) home, the first thing I start with is the exterior, bearing in mind we don't plan to hire help (this is a personal list, not for everyone).

- no more than .15 .18 acre behind the house (that's enough for us for a garden)

- siding that does not need painting or regular staining

- small (short) front yard

- short driveway

- no fencing that needs to be maintained

- simple landscaping. I don't care how lovely the place, if there's many (or any) shrubs to trim and shape and they can't be removed without making the front look bare, the home is off the list (some houses would require at least a PT gardener)

- how many stairs up to the front entrance - many a nice home has you hiking up a bunch of stairs (ok now, but in 10 years?)

- how many windows? is there a glassed in front porch, for ex, that's going to mean a lot of window washing

- if the roof isn't new or almost new, what is the size of it? they are pricey to replace - roof has to last our lifetime.

- how busy is the street/road onto which you have to emerge daily?


If the exterior passes the test, only then do I look at the online pics indoors.
I like your list of items in the search of a new (retirement) home. It is a lot of what I would be looking for. I for one dont plan on spending my days cleaning up after mother nature. I want to enjoy my leisure time. After a long cold winter I finally got out yesterday to chase a golf ball. Boy did it feel good.
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Old 04-14-2014, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,769,401 times
Reputation: 32309
Default Trying for broader context:

Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
While working with patients for MRI/CT, I quickly learned people forget how to do normal things if they aren't done on a regular basis. Laying on the stomach is one of those things. People could not figure out how to do it. Most would opt for sitting, then laying down and rolling onto their stomachs, but they couldn't get their arm out from under. The entire process confounded them and I would assist them. This happened with some middle aged people and then more often with the elderly.

For myself, we lived with an old cast iron tub for years and finally added plumbing for a shower with it 10 years ago. I got home late from work one night and took a shower before going to bed. Probably from being overtired, my one foot caught on the edge of the tub when I was getting out and I fell out of the tub onto the floor, twisting my knee. Being an MRI technologist, I had an MRI the next day and I had a bone bruise but no fracture, it took a long time to heal.

I wouldn't recommend a high sided tub for seniors, all it takes is one fall or slip and with the possibility of a broken hip and rehab in a nursing home and fingers crossed that you make it back out. Why play with odds that may be stacked against you?

Being in good shape and with good balance doesn't prevent a moments inattention with a resulting injury. Each passing year will increase the likelihood of not recovering as easily from those injuries.
I must say you have made a good case, and I thank you for your response. But in the overall scheme of things I still maintain it is an over-reaction to concern oneself with getting into and out of a normal height bathtub. Wasn't your "old cast iron tub" pretty high? Within the past month I climbed up a ladder and got onto the roof of our pool house to change a light bulb. Such a thing is a normal activity of daily living, meaning not that I do it daily but that it's the sort of thing normal people do in the course of their lives. Put into that context, and we are talking about BATHTUBS????? It just doesn't compute for me.
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Old 04-14-2014, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,612,888 times
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Renovate the bathroom. Take out the tub and put in a shower stall.
The plumbing is already there so it shouldn't be a major cost.
If it's your final destination then I can't see worrying about "resale value".
And since the tub was originally in that space it can be re-renovated back in.

If you see tubs as dangerous then get rid of them.
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Old 04-14-2014, 08:25 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,235,178 times
Reputation: 22386
Here are my 5 factors.

1. No yard work. Hubby loves yard work but can no longer do it, so that criteria meant condo/townhome/villa. We haven't found a villa in our target areas (5 counties in NC's Piedmont). The one-level condos we found felt depressing (to us).

2. Florida room/sunroom. Hubby needs light and a view during the day. We wanted a place where we could set up a hospital bed, if needed, and he could watch out the windows, over some green space/garden, and where we can set up an office and TV area, along with space for small table (eating area). That eliminated nearly every property we considered.

3. Bathrooms that can be retrofitted, if needed, with doorways that are wheelchair accessible. Retrofitting doesn't have to be terribly expensive, but that needs to be checked out before purchasing.

4. Short distance from parking to front door and no steps or steps that can easily have a ramp installed over them. That is harder to find than one might think!

5. Close proximity to groceries, bank, Emergency Room, entertainment venue, museum, library, park, coffee shop, church, post office, decent restaurants, continuing ed/teaching opportunities. The other big criteria is CRIME and law enforcement. Other considerations include: a good place to walk, a community where folks spend a lot of time outdoors (safety in numbers!); nearby green space; volunteer opportunities; support for small businesses; nearby body of water (for fishing, boating, if desired).

I would like to share something that I figured out along the way, in hopes this will help others in making decisions about a retirement home, especially if they are thinking about a condo or townhome.

Buy in an OWNER OCCUPIED ONLY development. There have been (and continue to be) so many foreclosed properties on the market (BANK OWNED). . . and the Feds and banks have devised special financing/loan products to encourage those properties to be purchased as INVESTMENTS. This very often means Section 8. If a person qualifies for Section 8, then this is a good thing for them, as more properties are open in what have typically been considered more affluent and upscale areas. However, not all renters are responsible folks. Finding a townhome development that was owner occupied only has been nearly impossible.

Finding an "owner occupied only" property was, in the end, our most important criteria.
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Old 04-14-2014, 08:55 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,235,178 times
Reputation: 22386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I must say you have made a good case, and I thank you for your response. But in the overall scheme of things I still maintain it is an over-reaction to concern oneself with getting into and out of a normal height bathtub. Wasn't your "old cast iron tub" pretty high? Within the past month I climbed up a ladder and got onto the roof of our pool house to change a light bulb. Such a thing is a normal activity of daily living, meaning not that I do it daily but that it's the sort of thing normal people do in the course of their lives. Put into that context, and we are talking about BATHTUBS????? It just doesn't compute for me.
It isn't that big of an expensive to tear out a tub and put in a shower, if it is a real concern. The other alternative (which is in most cases going to be more expensive - tear out the existing tub and put in one of those step-in tubs, with a "door").

However, slipping and falling in a bathroom is actually more of a concern than problems with getting in and out of a tub. People of all ages are seriously injured every year in bathrooms, simply with slipping and falling, bending over and slipping, etc.

The CDC reports that in 2008, more than 230,000 people over age 15 were injured in the bathroom.

Flooring is a big concern. I like tile in a bathroom but glazed tile can add to the potential hazards. Grab bars in the shower/bath can be helpful for everyone. Taller toilets can also make bathrooms safer (easier to get up from!)

I have never fallen getting in or out of a tub or shower, but I have slid IN a shower, b/c of slippery soap residue going down the drain (from shampoo/conditioner). I have also slid in a bathroom while cleaning the glazed tile floor - it was damp and I had on socks, lol.

I am very careful but as I age, I realize sometimes my mind is not always in the moment (I am working on mindfulness). It makes good sense to plan ahead and make sure our bathrooms are safe, accessible and functional to meet whatever impairments we either may have or might some day have.

And then there are life's sudden and unexpected occurrences . . . such as a stroke. My uncle lived to be 93, but spent the last 20 years aging in place after a stroke. The retrofitting was a big deal and thank goodness he had the $$$ to do it. No way he could have managed to stay in his home, otherwise. He often said how he wished he had made the changes BEFORE they were needed, as he had to stay in a rehab facility for months while working out getting his home in order.
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