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Old 04-14-2014, 10:19 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,436 posts, read 1,672,610 times
Reputation: 8708

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I must say you have made a good case, and I thank you for your response. But in the overall scheme of things I still maintain it is an over-reaction to concern oneself with getting into and out of a normal height bathtub. Wasn't your "old cast iron tub" pretty high? Within the past month I climbed up a ladder and got onto the roof of our pool house to change a light bulb. Such a thing is a normal activity of daily living, meaning not that I do it daily but that it's the sort of thing normal people do in the course of their lives. Put into that context, and we are talking about BATHTUBS????? It just doesn't compute for me.
I'm not going to live my life in fear, but plan on using common sense and revisiting decisions on what I can and cannot do as I age; life isn't static. DH still uses ladders, but there will come a day when he rethinks that activity. My 89 year old Dad still does his yardwork and I think that is a big part of what keeps him going and still active. 16 years ago, so at age 73, he was on a ladder retreiving chicken wire for the garden from a shelf. He missed a step going down and shattered his heel. He only fell three feet, but age does come into play with how easily a fracture happens and how long it takes to heal. He was well over a year before total recovery.

And yes, our tub does have higher sides. Here's a link to an article on tub/shower safety for seniors. The article is from 2006 but brings up interesting thoughts on safety, and they cite 1/3 of adults 60 and over having difficulty getting into or out of a tub or shower.

eta: we're heading back north soon, so I'll need to adjust to the tub again, I've been used to a walk in shower in FL. A walk in shower is usually safer, unless you have pets that wander into the shower area with you during a shower. I've had that happen. I will spare you from a link citing tripping over pet statistics.

Last edited by jean_ji; 04-14-2014 at 11:27 AM..
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Old 04-14-2014, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,988,950 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
I like your list of items in the search of a new (retirement) home. It is a lot of what I would be looking for. I for one dont plan on spending my days cleaning up after mother nature. I want to enjoy my leisure time. After a long cold winter I finally got out yesterday to chase a golf ball. Boy did it feel good.
In our state, finding such a home as outlined in my list, in an affordable price range (even unaffordable), is nigh impossible. Our son is a builder, so maybe we'll bite the bullet and have him create what we want. The question is where, as the price of land in Mass. is dear.
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Old 04-14-2014, 07:50 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,206 posts, read 1,350,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
I like your list of items in the search of a new (retirement) home. It is a lot of what I would be looking for. I for one dont plan on spending my days cleaning up after mother nature. I want to enjoy my leisure time. After a long cold winter I finally got out yesterday to chase a golf ball. Boy did it feel good.
Love that line
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Old 04-14-2014, 08:34 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,206 posts, read 1,350,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
The issue of climbing over the tub wall came up in at least one other thread; I posted then that I didn't understand how that could be difficult, and despite receiving some replies I still don't get it. There must be some medical conditions which make it hard to climb into a tub - can you tell me what some of them are to satisfy my curiosity?

Are you saying that large numbers of people refuse to maintain their ability to do normal things by not doing workouts which become essential at our age

Escort,

It's not that people don't want to exercise and keep themselves fit; if you are able to do that, that's wonderful! But there are some who for many reasons cannot do workouts -- arthritis, COPD (breathing problems), bad joints, or fibromyalgia like I have -- too much exercise or physical activity and it takes me 3 or 4 days to recover. ( I do go for a walk everyday.)

When I had my 80 year old mother living with me, I insisted she use the shower in my bathroom instead of the tub in her bathroom. She had vision problems (macular degeneration) which messed with her ability to judge distances. It's hard to climb over a tub wall when you aren't sure how far it is from you or how high it is, or you can't see parts of what is right in front of you.

Later she suffered a series of strokes. One resulted in something called "drop foot," which is the inability to lift the front part of the foot. This causes the toes to drag along the ground or stumble while walking. She had a prosthetic in her shoe to keep her foot level, but that doesn't help in the bath.

Thinking back to my grandmother... she suffered an inner ear injury late in life which caused balance problems that no amount of exercise could ever fix.

Escort, you are very fortunate that you are healthy enough to be able to exercise, climb ladders and such. I sincerely hope you continue in good health for many years to come.
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Old 04-15-2014, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Glenbogle
730 posts, read 1,028,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
Escort,It's not that people don't want to exercise and keep themselves fit; if you are able to do that, that's wonderful! But there are some who for many reasons cannot do workouts -- arthritis, COPD (breathing problems), bad joints, or fibromyalgia like I have -- too much exercise or physical activity and it takes me 3 or 4 days to recover.
Same here. To be honest, the decline in my what were my physical abilities during the past four years bothers me a LOT more than the loss of my looks (thinking back to an earlier thread here). In fact if a genie popped up and offered me a choice between looking 10 years younger again, or being able to do my typical everyday activities without pain, stiffness, or some other body-rebellion (lol) I wouldn't even think twice. I'd much rather look old and have the body parts "work" normally again, lol
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Old 04-15-2014, 12:15 PM
 
10,819 posts, read 8,071,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StressedOutNYer View Post
Same here. To be honest, the decline in my what were my physical abilities during the past four years bothers me a LOT more than the loss of my looks (thinking back to an earlier thread here). In fact if a genie popped up and offered me a choice between looking 10 years younger again, or being able to do my typical everyday activities without pain, stiffness, or some other body-rebellion (lol) I wouldn't even think twice. I'd much rather look old and have the body parts "work" normally again, lol
So true.
I'm one who looks every bit of my 65+ years but, knock on wood, I'm more fit than 20 years ago and have yet to encounter the pain or stiffness that afflicts many at my age. That takes a lot of work but I'm aware genetics and luck play a big part, too.

If offered the chance to trade those off - i.e. a youthful face in return for diminished mobility and ability - I'd not give it a moment's consideration.
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Old 04-15-2014, 02:59 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,206 posts, read 1,350,381 times
Reputation: 6344
Quote:
Originally Posted by StressedOutNYer View Post
Same here. To be honest, the decline in my what were my physical abilities during the past four years bothers me a LOT more than the loss of my looks (thinking back to an earlier thread here). In fact if a genie popped up and offered me a choice between looking 10 years younger again, or being able to do my typical everyday activities without pain, stiffness, or some other body-rebellion (lol) I wouldn't even think twice. I'd much rather look old and have the body parts "work" normally again, lol
Yeah. What bothers me most about not being able to do things is that I now have to pay others to do them -- like painting, cleaning the house, washing the car. It's hard to be dependent after spending a lifetime being a very independent person.
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Old 04-16-2014, 03:19 AM
 
Location: Mohali
6 posts, read 4,732 times
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Buying a Retirement Home can be thrilling and nerve-racking at the same time, especially for a first-time homebuyer. It's difficult to know exactly what to expect. The learning curve can be steep.
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Old 04-16-2014, 06:34 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,851,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamunaapartment View Post
Buying a Retirement Home can be thrilling and nerve-racking at the same time, especially for a first-time homebuyer. It's difficult to know exactly what to expect. The learning curve can be steep.

A first time homebuyer really should not even look at buying a new home as they are getting ready to or have already retired. That is like a complete life change and a darn bit of work. If DW didn't insist on having a house to maintain I would not even consider it. Still as you said for those of us who have been home owners it is quite thrilling. The search is even better but there are so many things to consider as you do that. I have poseted a number of threads on that subject here.
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Old 04-16-2014, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Glenbogle
730 posts, read 1,028,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
Yeah. What bothers me most about not being able to do things is that I now have to pay others to do them -- like painting, cleaning the house, washing the car. It's hard to be dependent after spending a lifetime being a very independent person.
I'm the same way. Unfortunately I can no longer afford to pay others to do things, and so it turns into an exercise in frustration (with some jobs, doing it a little bit at a time results in no real progress) or trying to figure out a tradeoff ("if I do this myself, then I won't be able to do X, Y and Z for the rest of the week or maybe even longer... is it really worth it or should I just not bother?")

I think this is what's behind the planning-for-the-worst mindset when it comes to buying a retirement home. It's not that I'm living in fear of being in a wheelchair, walker, etc ... it's that I don't want to have to deal with modifying my normal lifestyle to accomodate that change IF it happens, when I'm in my 70s, 80s or older. Especially if I don't know for sure that I would even have the money available to do so. Ten years ago I would never have imagined that my financial situation would be as negative as it is today. It certainly isn't going to get any better as time goes on. I'd rather redo a bathroom for a walk-in shower now rather than deal with having part of the house ripped up when I'm 80something and migiht not even be able to afford to have it done.
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