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Old 04-11-2014, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,848,939 times
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Found this piece on the web and I think we can get some thoughts come out of it.

5 Factors to Look at When Buying a Retirement Home

The five factors are:

Location, Transportation, Bathroom, Space and Maintenance, and finally Think Zoning.

My opening thoughts are of course location is key and number one in any list. This goes for if you are going to stay put or move when you retire. All the normal things come into play including some of the remainder of the list.

Transportation is very important since eventually driving will become a problem for some of us. So having reasonable transportation available will be very important.

The bathroom is overlooked by a lot of people until they realize that this is a hazardous area and you could be stuck with a non functioning bathroom for your physical condition. Also homes with stairs only are potentially a problem.

Space and maintenance is important since we might not need as much room if you downsize in retirement. Also who is going to maintain the home when you get older? Are you able to and do you have the skills necessary?

Lastly thinking zoning when chosing a place so that if you decide that a house is not in the cards in your 80s you might want an apartment in the same area with all your new older friends.

How are we all thinking these?
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Old 04-11-2014, 08:38 AM
 
13,319 posts, read 25,565,364 times
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My current home is where I hope to stay.
I had a full bathroom and bedroom built on the first floor (nothing important on the second floor- a guest loft/bath and dusty exercise equipment!) with the thought of being older. This came in handy when I had a severely infected dog bite on my foot and couldn't use a single step for five days.
Transportation, aye, that's the issue. Everything I need is within 2-3 miles except the hospital, which is eight. My town's Council on Aging does have a transport van for rides to the hospital, supermarket, pharmacy and a few other things, and the local towns are working on a consortium for some sort of expanded van/taxi service. It remains an issue.
The contractor who built my house lives down the street and does all maintenance for me after his day's work. I expect to have enough money to continue this (plus, he's ten years younger than me).
I could live in a smaller place but this is not too big- a big main living/dining/kitchen room, side bedroom and bath, a mudroom/storage room. Then there's the dusty loft upstairs (real stairs).
I have considered and will visit an Erickson community in the event that I really couldn't stay where I am, and would find their one-bedroom apartment (and pool and restaurant meals) quite doable. I just don't feel familiar with the town where it is located.
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Old 04-11-2014, 09:25 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,487,261 times
Reputation: 29071
"Think zoning," huh? Well, when I think too much I do tend to zone out and lose my train of thought. Then again, there are those who make you wonder if their train of thought has a caboose!

As for the rest, but for transportation (we're quite rural), we appear to have chosen wisely. Perhaps the best measure of that is the pleasure we take in our modest home (all on one level) and how we revel in our location and surroundings (walkable, park-like setting on the lake shore).

We both try not to over-think things.
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Old 04-11-2014, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Glenbogle
730 posts, read 1,027,552 times
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If a two-story house (or even a single-story house where the garage is in the basement) is considered, then the cost of a stairlift should be factored in. I recently priced a Savaria model for a straight stair (no turns or landings) and it was in the ballpark of $8000 installed.

Narrow bathroom doors are unfortunately common. :-( But the width of the bedroom-area hallway needs to be considered as well, because of the turning radius that has to be considered for a wheelchair. The scooter-type devices are easier in this regard but not everyone will have that option.

Another issue is the configuration of the washer & dryer. I see a lot of them being stacked and put into a recess or alcove, or in a former powder room. That's fine unless you're in a wheelchair; so, an alternate location for a side-by-side placement should be scouted out in advance.
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Old 04-11-2014, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Sinkholeville
1,496 posts, read 1,432,202 times
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Why did they ignore cost of living, crime, demographics, air quality, climate, and zero in on larger bathrooms?

Small bathrooms are just as safe, more to grab onto.
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Old 04-11-2014, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Glenbogle
730 posts, read 1,027,552 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuteTheMall View Post
Why did they ignore cost of living, crime, demographics, air quality, climate, and zero in on larger bathrooms?
I was assuming that the OP includes all those in the "location" category...

But if not, then it would balloon the "five factors" to something like a dozen, LOL

I didn't answer on my own behalf for just that reason; all of the elements you mentioned, that go into a choice of location, are too complex. Like a giant jigsaw puzzle that has to be completed first, LOL
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Old 04-11-2014, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Florida -
8,764 posts, read 10,845,692 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuteTheMall View Post
Why did they ignore cost of living, crime, demographics, air quality, climate, and zero in on larger bathrooms?

Small bathrooms are just as safe, more to grab onto.

I agree! Far too many of these 'news' articles are just common-sense space-fillers and don't really offer anything new. The suggestion that "Location" automatically encompasses all of the highly important issues you mentioned, is not supported by either the article or the OP. All in all, the article is a relatively weak piece of fluff, designed only to draw folks to the associated advertising.
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Old 04-11-2014, 09:56 AM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,943,432 times
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Small bathrooms often have smaller showers and not enough space for wheel chairs which can become a problem. Often small door openings that limit walker access. I would think more of single family zoning to eliminate building you don't want to live by.
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Old 04-11-2014, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Glenbogle
730 posts, read 1,027,552 times
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jghorton, you are so right --- just like those "Best/Worst Places to Retire" lists that keep turning up like a bad penny, LOL
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Old 04-11-2014, 09:59 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
2,172 posts, read 2,084,322 times
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We're doing many things the opposite of the standard recommendations.

We're moving from the balmy but boring weather of SoCal to north Idaho where we will enjoy four real seasons. I grew up with four seasons, have lived in SoCal for my entire working life, and I still miss real weather.

We are upsizing our home. Partly that's driven by the weather. In SoCal you can be outside pretty much year round, whereas in Idaho we'll want to be inside more in the winter. Partly it's driven by the type of homes that are available.

We're upsizing our property. However, most of our retirement property is pretty much undeveloped forest, so it will actually require less maintenance in many ways compared to where we live now.

We're moving to a rural area with limited public transportation options.

We're moving from a single story home to a 3 story home (including the basement). However, our retirement home has the master on the main floor, so we'll be able to pretty much live on the main floor if/when getting up and down stairs becomes a problem.

I have a friend who is going even more rural than we are. He'll be an hour from the nearest town, grocery store, doctor, hospital, etc.

Sometimes you have to throw caution to the winds and go for your dream!

Dave
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