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Old 04-14-2014, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Tennessee/Michigan
28,227 posts, read 47,656,129 times
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In the film 'Cyber-Seniors,' teens teach senior citizens to use the Internet

Saffron Cassaday is the director of the comedic documentary

She opens up about what she learned during the filming process and how it's helped bridge the generational gap

Watch teens teach seniors to use the Internet! | HLNtv.com
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Old 04-14-2014, 09:21 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,224 posts, read 1,360,218 times
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Reminds me of the time my son (then 9 or 10) taught my mother (then 60) to use Word Perfect. I think that was in the mid 80s. She caught on quickly. My dad, who was looking on, was totally befuddled.
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Old 04-14-2014, 10:39 PM
 
6,314 posts, read 4,762,537 times
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Sorry, all the seniors I know are highly tech savvy. The idea that kids are whizzes with technology and could teach seniors is just plain out of date by a full generation. The computer and information age is over 15 years old.
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Old 04-15-2014, 03:26 AM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,224 posts, read 1,360,218 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Sorry, all the seniors I know are highly tech savvy. The idea that kids are whizzes with technology and could teach seniors is just plain out of date by a full generation. The computer and information age is over 15 years old.

More like 30+ years. The IBM PC came out August 12, 1981. Before that there were mainframe computers. I worked with computers in the 70s.
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Old 04-15-2014, 03:41 AM
 
12,766 posts, read 14,114,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
More like 30+ years. The IBM PC came out August 12, 1981. Before that there were mainframe computers. I worked with computers in the 70s.
Ditto...gawd terminals were large. But I do remember teaching teenage new hire clericals some basics before they were given some formal training.
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Old 04-15-2014, 05:17 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,905 posts, read 18,914,045 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Sorry, all the seniors I know are highly tech savvy. The idea that kids are whizzes with technology and could teach seniors is just plain out of date by a full generation. The computer and information age is over 15 years old.
Yeh, same here. Our senior center finally got computers and they started having classes. I guess no one showed up. Seniors already know how to use computers. Now they've started private computer lessons if someone needs help with something in particular. I went once when I got my new laptop, to get it set up and figure it out.
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Old 04-15-2014, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2,540 posts, read 3,278,867 times
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On the other side of the coin.............

Here in Toronto, Goodwill has a course on basic auto repairs and servicing, that is focused on young males, who want to know more about their car. The teachers are all retired guys that used to be in the automotive industry, as either techs or service writers in dealerships. The teens have two choices, work on their own cars, for more understanding, or they can take a formal class, that teaches them what they need to know to get a part time job at a shop/ dealership , as a helper.

The facility is supported by public donations, and the teachers are all volunteers, who are not paid. The teens pay for materials/ parts that they use, but at wholesale prices. A number of corporations support the program, with money, and equipment/tools. In return they get trained young people, who are work ready, to do tire changes, oil and lube, and other basic automotive work, under a trained mechanic's supervision. Some of the young people go on to do a full apprenticeship, as a auto mechanic, later on.

A second program, run by the Salvation Army, teaches people of any age , how to strip down computer equipment, for e scrap , as a trade skill. The program is aimed at those who are "long term unemployed " and it has had great results. A used or dead computer tower has about 40 to 60 dollars worth of parts in it, once it has been taken apart. Training takes place in an industrial building, with the school on one side and the commercial operation on the other side. Trainees get a one month training program, at no cost to them. If they prove that they can come to work every day, pay attention and LEARN the steps to do a proper job of breaking down a computer, they are offered a paying job on the commercial side of the building. That pays them $14 an hour, to start with benefits, for a 40 hour week. They can make more in a bonus program, if they beat their weekly requirement. Most are making around 18 an hour, after a few weeks of getting into the swing of the work.

Both of those programs depend on retried seniors, who are the teachers and mentors. It is a win win for all involved.

Jim B.

Toronto.
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Old 04-15-2014, 11:32 AM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,249,708 times
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They should have a class for 'youngers' with seniors teaching them how to cook simply from scratch. Easy stuff like meatloaf or chickencacciatore or beef stew or quiche, etc etc etc.

Or even how to make ice tea. I have a great-niece who thinks all ice tea comes bottled with a label on it
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Old 04-15-2014, 11:38 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,773 posts, read 7,060,462 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Sorry, all the seniors I know are highly tech savvy. The idea that kids are whizzes with technology and could teach seniors is just plain out of date by a full generation. The computer and information age is over 15 years old.

Oh, I think there may still be some seniors around who aren't as tech savvy as they would like to be, and would appreciate the help of a younger generation to bring them up to speed. Especially with the speed with which technology changes.
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Old 04-15-2014, 03:39 PM
 
14,267 posts, read 24,029,111 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Sorry, all the seniors I know are highly tech savvy. The idea that kids are whizzes with technology and could teach seniors is just plain out of date by a full generation. The computer and information age is over 15 years old.

There are TWO GENERATIONS of seniors.

The early baby boomers, especially college graduates, are pretty familiar with computers and fairly comfortable with them.

Our parents, many of whom are in their 80s do NOT use computers.

Honestly, as much as I have used computers, there are a few things that I would like to have a college student walk me through on the computer.
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