U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-22-2014, 01:26 PM
 
14,264 posts, read 24,009,233 times
Reputation: 20097

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Garfunkle524 View Post
Agreed. Things do seem to be accelerating though. I'm no economist, but the crazy swings the past few weeks have been concerning.
And two months ago, the lack of volatility was incredible.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-22-2014, 01:29 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,154,879 times
Reputation: 10910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
For many, the good jobs and benefits of the past won't be there anymore. Most of the jobs we're creating are low wage jobs, and with low wage employment comes few benefits. Not only do you have fewer absolute dollars to invest at a low income, you're also less likely to have help from your employer on the investing side.

Moving forward, I think the best strategy for a lot of Millenials is to work from the expense side, cutting expenses and reducing debt, as I don't think many will be able to count on the investment growth and benefits of prior generations.
We allowed the goose that laid the golden egg to escape from the farm. Well paying manufacturing jobs have declined here in the US as firms moved their operations to "low cost" geographies. And now, even things like engineering, marketing and finance jobs are escaping. Globalism was sold to us as a sort of rising tide lifting all boats. The wonderful new middle class would be created in China, India etc, and instead of making our money making things we'd make our money selling all those new middle class people movies, insurance and services. Hmmm ... didn't quite work out that way.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2014, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
27,798 posts, read 26,235,889 times
Reputation: 14611
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
The Dow is a terrible bench mark to use.
Okay, then use NASDAQ, use SP 500. - same results.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2014, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,852,811 times
Reputation: 6379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
No one should be looking at retirement gains/losses in terms of weeks, or even a single year.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BucFan View Post
Okay, then use NASDAQ, use SP 500. - same results.

As Emigrations says above.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2014, 08:29 AM
 
191 posts, read 419,762 times
Reputation: 144
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoByFour View Post
Very true.

My point is that if a 22-year-old is spending all his time at the stock market because of worrying about being able to retire at 60, there is something wrong with our society. But if this is a person's idea of fun, certainly no harm in that.
I am 25 years old. After having to take care of my mom because she didnt save enough for retirement, YES, I worry A LOT about not having enough savings for my retirement. Especially when I know that SS will not likely be there to help me along the way so I started putting as much as I can in my 401k since I was 21 y/o.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2014, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,614 posts, read 17,598,460 times
Reputation: 27693
Quote:
Originally Posted by BucFan View Post
Okay, then use NASDAQ, use SP 500. - same results.
The NASDAQ has never returned to its all-time high in 2000. However, most markets have risen since that time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2014, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
27,798 posts, read 26,235,889 times
Reputation: 14611
Quote:
Originally Posted by thompsons211 View Post
I am 25 years old. After having to take care of my mom because she didnt save enough for retirement, YES, I worry A LOT about not having enough savings for my retirement. Especially when I know that SS will not likely be there to help me along the way so I started putting as much as I can in my 401k since I was 21 y/o.
there's no reason to spend night and day worrying about it, but as an adult it is reasonable to make sure you have a plan for your retirement and re-look the plan at least once a year to balance, rebalance your portfolio and adjust your plan accordingly......I listen to Ric Edelman's radio show on weekends and used to listen to Bob Brinker's radio show to keep in tune with what I should be doing and rarely used a financial planner - everything I did was based on learning from reading financial magazines, reading a few investment books (basic level). I only entered stock investments once and didn't do well - did opt for stock mutual funds and invested for the long term and thing have turned out fantastically........think on the long term.

.....but still live your life. Be careful about being overly materialistic, buying a house when you should be renting, buying an automobile too frequently, wasting money on "stuff" that you really don't need or can't afford.

Again - pay yourself first.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2014, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
27,798 posts, read 26,235,889 times
Reputation: 14611
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
The NASDAQ has never returned to its all-time high in 2000. However, most markets have risen since that time.
You're mistaken. Today NASDAQ 4483......peak in 2000 was 3940.

^IXIC Interactive Chart | Yahoo! Inc. Stock - Yahoo! Finance

But it has nothing to do with my point. My point was the media makes today's market look bleak - I heard Tom Brokaw use the word "crash" the other day on radio. But if you look at today's levels of DOW, SP 500, NASDAQ, all three are up from the start of the year.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-31-2014, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
27,798 posts, read 26,235,889 times
Reputation: 14611
^DJI Interactive Stock Chart | Yahoo! Inc. Stock - Yahoo! Finance

alll that hand wringing over the last few months.......
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-31-2014, 02:17 PM
 
71,735 posts, read 71,853,273 times
Reputation: 49289
Quote:
Originally Posted by BucFan View Post
You're mistaken. Today NASDAQ 4483......peak in 2000 was 3940.

^IXIC Interactive Chart | Yahoo! Inc. Stock - Yahoo! Finance

But it has nothing to do with my point. My point was the media makes today's market look bleak - I heard Tom Brokaw use the word "crash" the other day on radio. But if you look at today's levels of DOW, SP 500, NASDAQ, all three are up from the start of the year.
nasdaq closed at over 5000 on march 10th 2000. it had been over 5100 earlier that day. we are still behind.

Last edited by mathjak107; 10-31-2014 at 02:25 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top