U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-24-2014, 03:52 PM
 
2,975 posts, read 2,701,897 times
Reputation: 5622

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
Oh, yes you do. And you are spot on, too.
We're retired. And have more than we need. I am mostly Curator of Our Home. And Keeper of Family Peace.

So we send our grandson to college and have firm plans to give most of it away when we die. But we won't give much to the children. None to the grandchildren. They know we love them and they know we don't believe in such things.

We believe in Libraries. Animal shelters.

And in the meantime, we are NEVER going to have to ask you or anyone else for anything at all. And that's what it is for.


I also believe in libraries, animal shelters, and homeless shelters. I believe those should be paid for through our taxes, and the gifts of wealthy individuals.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-24-2014, 03:57 PM
 
Location: NC
1,985 posts, read 2,649,900 times
Reputation: 3090
Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
Oh, yes you do. And you are spot on, too.
We're retired. And have more than we need. I am mostly Curator of Our Home. And Keeper of Family Peace.

So we send our grandson to college and have firm plans to give most of it away when we die. But we won't give much to the children. None to the grandchildren. They know we love them and they know we don't believe in such things.

We believe in Libraries. Animal shelters.

And in the meantime, we are NEVER going to have to ask you or anyone else for anything at all. And that's what it is for.
It's wonderful that you invested in your grandson's education.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2014, 04:49 PM
 
5,424 posts, read 3,442,945 times
Reputation: 13693
Plenty of people have never owned a home so they are paying to rent an apartment during retirement which can eat up the majority of one's monthly social security check.

And plenty of people do not have their home mortgage paid off when entering retirement and during retirement.

Or they have taken large home equity loans out on their mortgages which need to be paid off.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2014, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
Reputation: 32304
Default Car expenses (amount of driving)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Q44 View Post
.....Add to your bullets no more mortgage, mileage on the cars cut back by 80%, the bloodsucking leeches (my kids) have graduated and moved on. . . .
I'm sure you are describing your own situation accurately. However, I now drive more than when I worked full time, for two reasons:

1. I was fortunate enough to have a relatively short commute the last 21 years of my career - no more than 8.5 miles one-way. Not everyone has a long commute.

2. I now have more time to go places and do things. I am not one to hunker down at home.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2014, 05:00 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,324,391 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by foglover View Post
You are wrong on several counts, but I will first address your scourging interpretation of my diction.

First, I applaud you for your interest in art, beauty, and global culture. I share your interests in these. However I suspect that many people travel simply because they can and because it is the thing to do. Personally, I've never been interested in being a tourist. I love languages and would want to spend enough time in one place to pick up a good helping of the local lingo and unearth some of the real life and not just the touristy high spots. Perhaps the people here on CD are not the usual ugly American travelers. I have no way of knowing this one way or the other.

You may have some small justification on arguing the word 'fetish', but 'indulge'? Absolutely not. No sort of judgment should be inferred at all. It is simply a verb that describes a pursuit.

Furthermore, I do not see where I have excorciated anyone for 'indulging' activities that are 'beyond the basics'. I included those items as a countdown to reasonable expenses that financially secure people would incur.

I too plan to enjoy retirement and plan for it to be much more enjoyable and productive than the worklife that preceded it. I will be retiring to Maine - talk about economically depressed! However, I am fortunate that I do not require large sums with which to enjoy life. True, my newest 'indulgence', painting, is more expensive than any I've had previously. You would not believe the cost of art supplies!

Finally, Scotia-Glenville is not economically-depressed. The zip code, unfortunately, comes up as Schenectady and Schenectady is another world. Most of us work for the state and while that might be chump change in NYC, here it is good enough.
I know lots of people with NYS pensions who have retired at 55 or 56 and live comfortably. They look forward to adding in SS at 62 or 66. Having a NYS pension is like having $1-2 million in a 401k only better. It's for life ... and for your spouse's as well if you take that option; it's fiscally sound; and it's protected by the NYS Constitution. It's also tax-free if you continue to live in NYS. I know because I have one, too. That puts you and me in an entirely different ball park than the lady that you referenced in your post who had no pension at all, only a 401k.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2014, 05:09 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,824 posts, read 18,832,665 times
Reputation: 33721
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
Tis better to have than not have. Accumulating money is a result of not spending all you have coming in. Isn't that good? The more you make the more you save at the same ratio of income/spending.
Accumulating money is also a result of making a lot of money. Few people spend all they have coming in. It's assumptions like this that cause the arguments on here. If you are wealthy, fine. It doesn't necessarily mean you worked any harder or longer than anyone else and it doesn't necessarily mean that you saved and they didn't. It doesn't mean you are any smarter or any better than anyone else either. You're also ignoring all the people who have endured health crises and late divorces or some other issues. Some people have their money stolen by the likes of Bernie Maldoffs, I suppose that makes them lesser human beings who aren't very smart.
__________________
my posts as moderator will be in red. Moderator: Health&Wellness~Genealogy. The Rules--read here>>> TOS. If someone attacks you, do not reply. Hit REPORT.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2014, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
Reputation: 32304
Default Everything is relative - comment on vague use of language

I have been reading and posting on City-Data for a little over four years now, and I have noticed a tendency for people to talk past each other because each person seems to quite understandably take his or her own personal situation as the norm. Take the following terms, all of which I have taken from various posts in this thread:

-- straightforward retirement
-- guaranteed comfort level
-- travel
-- good enough
-- high rollers

I submit that all the above are vague enough to be totally meaningless. What is a "high roller"? I'll tell you what one is - anybody who has more money than we do! We speak of "travel", but not how we travel (Motel 6 versus high-end hotels). What is "comfort level"? (Example of the latter: My father enjoyed camping out recreationally - I mean in a tent. But for my mother "roughing it" meant living normally at home.)

I can see both sides of this (or both ends of the continuum), as I am more or less in the middle of all these discussions, financially speaking. By that I mean I notice many posters who have less than I do and many posters who have more than I do. And I have to plead guilty to using the same imprecise language I am complaining about. For example, I have described my retirement as "comfortable, but not lavish". Well what the hell does that mean? Answer: it means different things to different people!

I believe there will always be a gulf of misunderstanding. All we can do to narrow it is to be as precise as possible. That is, if we speak about "modest" housing, we should describe exactly what we mean - what size house, with what features and amenities?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2014, 05:30 PM
 
Location: NC
1,985 posts, read 2,649,900 times
Reputation: 3090
I wonder if some of these folks who are struggling live in a very high COL place like NY, NY, MD, CA, etc.? Almost like they refused to move for whatever reason, never downgraded their homes after the kids moved out, and still pay an outrageous amount in taxes/utilities?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2014, 06:19 PM
 
3,673 posts, read 4,932,067 times
Reputation: 2422
I think the point is living well, and being happy.
If you can do that with less money, then no problem...do that....if you need more money to be happy with the activities/life style you now can afford, then that's ok too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2014, 07:56 PM
 
29,764 posts, read 34,851,819 times
Reputation: 11675
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Accumulating money is also a result of making a lot of money. Few people spend all they have coming in. It's assumptions like this that cause the arguments on here. If you are wealthy, fine. It doesn't necessarily mean you worked any harder or longer than anyone else and it doesn't necessarily mean that you saved and they didn't. It doesn't mean you are any smarter or any better than anyone else either. You're also ignoring all the people who have endured health crises and late divorces or some other issues. Some people have their money stolen by the likes of Bernie Maldoffs, I suppose that makes them lesser human beings who aren't very smart.
Did you read my last sentence? I said the more you make the more you save at the same rate of savings
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top