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Old 04-25-2014, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,988,950 times
Reputation: 15649

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I have been reading and posting on City-Data for a little over four years now, and I have noticed a tendency for people to talk past each other because each person seems to quite understandably take his or her own personal situation as the norm. Take the following terms, all of which I have taken from various posts in this thread:

-- straightforward retirement
-- guaranteed comfort level
-- travel
-- good enough
-- high rollers

I submit that all the above are vague enough to be totally meaningless. What is a "high roller"? I'll tell you what one is - anybody who has more money than we do! We speak of "travel", but not how we travel (Motel 6 versus high-end hotels). What is "comfort level"? (Example of the latter: My father enjoyed camping out recreationally - I mean in a tent. But for my mother "roughing it" meant living normally at home.)

I can see both sides of this (or both ends of the continuum), as I am more or less in the middle of all these discussions, financially speaking. By that I mean I notice many posters who have less than I do and many posters who have more than I do. And I have to plead guilty to using the same imprecise language I am complaining about. For example, I have described my retirement as "comfortable, but not lavish". Well what the hell does that mean? Answer: it means different things to different people!

I believe there will always be a gulf of misunderstanding. All we can do to narrow it is to be as precise as possible. That is, if we speak about "modest" housing, we should describe exactly what we mean - what size house, with what features and amenities?

There is no way to create objective criteria to satisfy your call. I live in 1400 sf, open layout, and that is a big home for me. Others would deride that as too small and uncomfortable. Modest to some may mean 2500 or 3500 sf, while to me it's way more than necessary for a comfortable lifestyle. A one-week trip per year is "travel," and so is traveling the world in several months. "Eating out often" can mean high-class restaurants with ok food or modest restaurants with wholesome foods, or vice versa.

So what I'd like to know is what is gained for any of us by knowing "precisely" anything about others. It only causes unnecessary comparison and confusion, very seldom if at all apples to apples. I am comfortably retired, but so many may not think so. Do I care what they think, and more precisely, how can it matter now that I'm retired? It is what it is.

To me, the most pertinent discussions on Retirement is around financial information and choices, relocation information, and practical matters that can be enlightening and helpful. Not in who has what and how, and the endless commentaries on what is rich and what is poor and how the poor haven't saved, etc etc.
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Old 04-25-2014, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,942,381 times
Reputation: 6717
Quote:
Originally Posted by boogie'smom View Post

"You should never look at someone else as an "inspiration" " Really?
Not when that inspiration's life is the result of good genes that you may not have. My father's family has amazing genes. Father died at 96 - mother at 103. Three of five siblings are now in their mid-90's with no major health issues (2 siblings died in their 80's - one was obese and the other was an alcoholic - pretty good longevity in spite of lifestyles). Most people don't have genes like this. Robyn
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Old 04-25-2014, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,942,381 times
Reputation: 6717
Quote:
Originally Posted by boogie'smom View Post
...Also, I get to factor in both chronic and acute disease onset before the age of 65. ...
You're not even a senior until you're 65. So what does anything pre-age 65 have to do with most stuff seniors deal with? Robyn
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Old 04-25-2014, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,942,381 times
Reputation: 6717
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
There is no way to create objective criteria to satisfy your call. I live in 1400 sf, open layout, and that is a big home for me. Others would deride that as too small and uncomfortable. Modest to some may mean 2500 or 3500 sf, while to me it's way more than necessary for a comfortable lifestyle. A one-week trip per year is "travel," and so is traveling the world in several months. "Eating out often" can mean high-class restaurants with ok food or modest restaurants with wholesome foods, or vice versa.

So what I'd like to know is what is gained for any of us by knowing "precisely" anything about others. It only causes unnecessary comparison and confusion, very seldom if at all apples to apples. I am comfortably retired, but so many may not think so. Do I care what they think, and more precisely, how can it matter now that I'm retired? It is what it is.

To me, the most pertinent discussions on Retirement is around financial information and choices, relocation information, and practical matters that can be enlightening and helpful. Not in who has what and how, and the endless commentaries on what is rich and what is poor and how the poor haven't saved, etc etc.
I think the biggest issue for most seniors - especially those not at poverty level who get government assistance (which isn't necessarily that swell but is better than nothing) is health care (much more important than the cost of long term care for most people IMO). We can all decide what size house we care to live in - what/where we want to eat - when/where we care to travel - but health care is the wild card. Especially when it comes to things like the cost of good Medigap insurance - the availability of good primary care without having to get into a concierge practice - and - especially - the cost of a lot of meds. I know that 10 years ago - I was budgeting perhaps 1/3 of what I'm spending today for health care. And I only think it will get worse. I can afford it. But - for people who say money doesn't matter - it sure does when it comes to health care. Robyn
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Old 04-25-2014, 05:48 PM
 
10,819 posts, read 8,071,380 times
Reputation: 17034
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Oh my - looks like you're reading out of books and not walking around places. Or understanding how medical stuff works.
I did quote from our Texas code, only because I thought you asked where I lived and seemed to be interested in the legal distinctions. Yes, I keep the codes handy and am familiar with them because I've long had an interest and personal stake in elder care.

I've had hands-on experience with several loved ones - my grandmother, dh's grandfather, my aunt, dh's aunt & uncle, my mother, dh's mother - who spent time in SNF's and ALC's here in Texas during the last 20 years, and for whom dh and I were/are the "go-to" people in our families who negotiate the system. You can read back over my C-D posts from previous years to find examples of situations I've dealt with.

I'm bemused and somewhat puzzled that you so quickly presume I'm uninformed and try to discount my experience, why is that?
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Old 04-25-2014, 05:55 PM
 
Location: southern h
139 posts, read 301,895 times
Reputation: 173
it seems to me that the people telling retirees that they may not have enough money to live on are the same ones looking to "manage" that money for you and take their cut
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Old 04-25-2014, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Prescott Valley,az summer/east valley Az winter
2,042 posts, read 3,629,622 times
Reputation: 7884
there are still a lot of people making a lot of generalizations here that may or may not be true of your individual situation.
So I'll make some also~~ I've seen a lot of people that put the cost of out of pocket healthcare at about $250,000 per person and I believe that. Seen many people who's health prior to retirement very healthy that are now takig in excess of 10 prescriptions (including my wife) and most health plans do not completely pay all drugs. Also as far as the generalization that you save a ton of money on clothes and transportation tends to be way off base. As I was a troubleshooter for a construction company my clothing expense for a year was probably in the $100 range. Now people around me expect me to dress much better than then. I also had a company truck at my fulltime disposal so they could route me from home to a jobsite at any time so my vehicle expense per year went from zero to a lot higher figure. Knowing this I planned for it. I could not possibly live on my old takehome pay and would have trouble after about 15 years of retirement to live on just double my old takehome~ and I glad that my net at the moment is close to triple the last years takehome as I love to live rather than exist~ so to all of you people that think that 70% of your old salary s sufficient I say each case is separate and must be examined as individual because one size does not fit all!
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Old 04-25-2014, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,751,136 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
There is no way to create objective criteria to satisfy your call. I live in 1400 sf, open layout, and that is a big home for me. Others would deride that as too small and uncomfortable. Modest to some may mean 2500 or 3500 sf, while to me it's way more than necessary for a comfortable lifestyle. A one-week trip per year is "travel," and so is traveling the world in several months. "Eating out often" can mean high-class restaurants with ok food or modest restaurants with wholesome foods, or vice versa.

So what I'd like to know is what is gained for any of us by knowing "precisely" anything about others. It only causes unnecessary comparison and confusion, very seldom if at all apples to apples. I am comfortably retired, but so many may not think so. Do I care what they think, and more precisely, how can it matter now that I'm retired? It is what it is.

To me, the most pertinent discussions on Retirement is around financial information and choices, relocation information, and practical matters that can be enlightening and helpful. Not in who has what and how, and the endless commentaries on what is rich and what is poor and how the poor haven't saved, etc etc.
You missed my point. I was commenting on the amount of arguing back and forth about financial matters and offered my analysis that much of it can be traced to vague language and assumptions about our own situation being a norm and reasoning from there. My comments were prompted by this thread, although the mutual misunderstandings are common to so many similar threads.

Any "endless commentaries" you aren't interested in you can skip - i.e., not read. That is why there are thread titles, which are pretty good, if less than perfect, guides. I don't enter discussions of living in or moving to North or South Carolina (which seem to abound here) just to say I'm not interested. What would be the point of that? If something piques my curiosity regarding the Carolinas I may read it, but that whole discussion is as relevant to me as living in Siberia. My personal lack of interest does not make those discussions irrelevant or invalid!
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Old 04-25-2014, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,988,950 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post

Any "endless commentaries" you aren't interested in you can skip - i.e., not read. That is why there are thread titles, which are pretty good, if less than perfect, guides. I don't enter discussions of living in or moving to North or South Carolina (which seem to abound here) just to say I'm not interested. What would be the point of that? If something piques my curiosity regarding the Carolinas I may read it, but that whole discussion is as relevant to me as living in Siberia. My personal lack of interest does not make those discussions irrelevant or invalid!
I suppose many of the comments about why retirees are not wealthy are "relevant," insofar as they do tend to underscore the commentator's sense of self-reliance, however these comments are seldom productive. To me, CD Forum is at its best when posters share concrete information about locations, relocation, products, and strategies of all kinds, rather than idle speculations about the circumstances of retirees.

As to the first part of your post, above, thanks for clarifying.
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Old 04-25-2014, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Long Island
8,743 posts, read 12,203,440 times
Reputation: 5048
Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post
I'm gray and old, having a grand time spending the money I hoarded. If I had spent it all when I was younger, I'd be broke and miserable now instead of having the time of my life.
I started my 401k when I was 22 so I'll have plenty by the time I retire. My point is there's no sense hoarding more for the sake of saving for later - you can still spend and not be broke later (especially if you admit to hoarding). I have to ask why you wouldn't RATHER spend money when you were younger compared to now. Big house for just the 2 (or 1) of you or nice car to go hardly anywhere when you're a senior...? Doesn't make logical sense to me. What are you doing with money having the time of your life now that you did not want to do when young? I think most would say travel. Then again, most don't travel many months of the year but make it seem like that's a huge deal. When you're older, you just have a lot of time on your hands and probably have to purposely find things to spend money on. Then there are potentially other factors like health and disability. That's just the way I see it so I'd love to hear where I'm mistaken.

Last edited by ovi8; 04-25-2014 at 06:39 PM..
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