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Old 04-25-2014, 11:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mastequila View Post
I actually own such a business, not a boarding house, but a rooming house (never could find someone to cook for the roomers). There is a common living area, a full kitchen, and every room has a small refrigerator, private bath, and flat screen. I don't live in an urban area, and the person running it has left for a new job. After all current tenants left, I closed it. I'd love to re-open, as I'm carrying the note, but I'm not sure it's a viable option. It certainly isn't particularly low cost for my area. Cheaper than a motel, for sure, but not as cheap as a stand alone house with roommates. In addition to a kitchen, dining area, living room with big screen, we included all utilities, laundry facilities, Direct TV, internet, a patio with grill, and weekly cleaning.

I've thought of different things to do with the property such as an Alzheimer's group home, a more traditional B&B, or converting to offices or fewer apartments. But I really like the rooming/boarding house model as described by some of you.

Out of curiosity, what would you say would be a fair price for such a set up, recognizing regional differences? As a reference point, in my area, a single/double in the cheapest motel is about $50/75. A small house with 2-3 bedrooms, one bath would be $650-1000 (depending on which end of the average range it's amenities fall into), plus utilities. I'd be grateful for your feedback--what would you do if such a building were suddenly to fall in your lap?
Very Interesting. The problem if you are thinking about an Alzheimer group home, you will be moving into an area of a medical care facility with the associated licensing and trained staff required by your State. It would be consider a board and care facility of assisted living. You then have the issues with Medicare and Medicaid which brings more regulations.

Boarding houses and Rooming houses were found mostly in urban dense areas because owning a car was not a part of everyday life of the past and people needed to walk to public transit and essential shopping. Today many more people own cars but the cost of buying a car and maintaining a car is very costly and may be prohibitive to those of low income, seeking to live in these types of housing. Not having a walkable area with good public transit would not work for a Boarding or Rooming House in most locations.

Does the area have a unique attraction or an interesting natural environment? I would try to tie these facility into an attraction that may bring tourist into your area. If there is a significant season for higher income visitors then you can bring the building up to a bed and breakfast facility.

Another idea, since you have somewhat described this area as a lower income area. I would approach HUD to look to establish a senior housing under section 202, that is supportive housing for the low income elderly HUD - Multifamily Housing - Program Description

You can get financial support with grants and/or low interesting funding for renewal and rehab of the facility with new construction. You can then re-capitalize and pay off the note. You could also change/transfer/sell the ownership definition of the property to non-profit which would seek the funding under HUD, which then purchase the property from you; operate this property and relieve you of the sole financial ownership and obligations.

You can also seek to establish a section 8 project based housing under HUD which would provide you with financial subsidy to provide such housing. You can couple that with State grants and low interest financial assistance for rehabilitation of the structure.

There are other programs of HUD and your state that may apply in rehabilitation of the facility.

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 04-25-2014 at 11:56 AM..
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Old 04-25-2014, 11:35 AM
 
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I think perhaps you forgot the extended stay motels and ability of companies which used them to house temporary crews can rent for months now days and have food arrangements made locally to feed which was a large part of the boarding house business. My grand mother had one in Penn. and my father had a lot of tales. Even thinking of housing people with some of the medical problems you describe brings you under even more regulations. They died for a lot of reasons much of which has to do with being replaced basically.
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Old 04-25-2014, 11:49 AM
 
Location: USA
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Got one of these rooming houses not far from where I live. $80 a week gets you all the bedbugs and gunshots at 2 am that you could possibly want.
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Old 04-25-2014, 12:09 PM
 
Location: land of ahhhs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s1alker View Post
Got one of these rooming houses not far from where I live. $80 a week gets you all the bedbugs and gunshots at 2 am that you could possibly want.
No bedbugs, knock wood. Maybe a gunshot or two, say if you broke into my house
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Old 04-25-2014, 12:35 PM
 
Location: land of ahhhs
277 posts, read 298,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karen_in_nh_2012 View Post
What's the rental market like in your area? Is there a NEED for a rooming house?

How close to the house do you live? You mentioned you had someone else manage it, which made me wonder if it is far away from you. (I own one rental house but it's only 10 minutes away from me -- I would not want to be a long-distance landlord!)

What kind of neighborhood is it? Are there other single-family houses? Could you convert it back to a single-family house and sell it that way, or do you WANT to make it a rental?
No real NEED for a rooming house, but our area had a little boom that has since subsided, not died. I could probably re-fill with semi-transient workers. They were OK folk, really, no problem. Just curious about marketing toward a more permanent renter. I, too, live within 10 minutes of the property, and that's a'foot. But I work full time 50 miles away. Not cool when someone forgets their key or the internet goes down. The building is located right down town, and I use the term loosely. Very small town, with a lot of businesses relocated along the highway. I can't imagine not having a car, but a person could walk to most any business in town within 10-15 minutes. It's just that no one does. There's a senior center a block away. Minimal public transit.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
I lived in boarding houses from 1982-84 and in 1994. it is NOT a lifestyle that I would not want to return to.

The first problem is that you have ZERO control over who the landlord rents to. One of the places that I lived for a year was alright ... until one of the guys moved out. The landlord rented the place out to one of the local hookers and you can imagine the quality of life.

The second problem was the "shared" kitchen. If you wanted to use it, you had to clean up the mess that one of the slobs would leave EVERY NIGHT. No thanks.

Third, security is minimal as you do not know who has a key to your place.
Good points, and why I need a local manager. You can't count on guys to keep a community kitchen cleaned up. Somehow can't imagine hookers ever being a problem, but there's always something.

Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
Very Interesting.

Does the area have a unique attraction or an interesting natural environment? I would try to tie these facility into an attraction that may bring tourist into your area. If there is a significant season for higher income visitors then you can bring the building up to a bed and breakfast facility.

Another idea, since you have somewhat described this area as a lower income area. I would approach HUD to look to establish a senior housing under section 202, that is supportive housing for the low income elderly HUD - Multifamily Housing - Program Description

You can also seek to establish a section 8 project based housing under HUD which would provide you with financial subsidy to provide such housing. You can couple that with State grants and low interest financial assistance for rehabilitation of the structure.

There are other programs of HUD and your state that may apply in rehabilitation of the facility.

Livecontent
What great ideas, LC!
We do have several seasonal events that always find the motels filled, but no tourist attractions on a year round basis. My best bet is the transient workers I suspect. Darn the luck, there's no nearby university or I'd make it a frat house, lol.
I do find your OP on this kind of housing alternative interesting, though, and I'd like to pursue it, at least test the waters. I'm just not sure I can price it affordably enough in this economy.
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Old 04-25-2014, 12:45 PM
 
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I had a few friends who lived in boarding houses in east Dallas back in the late 1960s. It worked out well enough for them but they were in their early 20s.
These were large 2 and 3 story homes; all the bedrooms were upstairs and each bathroom was shared by 4-5 roomers. They wouldn't have been at all suitable for frail seniors.

How many one story homes have enough bedrooms and baths to take in boarders?
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Old 04-25-2014, 12:59 PM
 
Location: State of Grace
1,582 posts, read 1,136,515 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
I really like to propose an idea much different today but was very common yesterday to help with some housing issues of today. I think we should return to a way of the pasts and reintroduce Boarding Houses for low cost housing. They served a good basic housing for single workers and for singles in retirement.

Boarding house - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It is where you rent a room for a very long extended time and it is inclusive with full meals. You share common living rooms, kitchen and bathrooms. I suspect some are still in operation but I know not where.

I am not so indicating that which people rent rooms in their house. I am not talking about communal type living arrangements. I am not talking about expensive co-housing. I am talking about those specifically called boarding houses and may perhaps require a license from a municipality. Has anyone seen such type of housing?

It is not a bed and breakfast which is basically a short term residency for travelers that comes with breakfast.

I am sure you would be familiar with this concept if you watched old movies. Some of us can remember them when we were younger.

I picked up a girl for a date who worked as a secretary. She lived in a women's only boarding house--that was about 45 years ago. I had to wait in the front pallor for her to come from her room.

I remember visiting a bachelor man in a boarding house about that same time. There were men and woman sitting in a common room watching television. He had his own room with a common bath down the hall. He lived in this house for about 15 years. He worked at a bank.

This would solve many of the problems listed as providing more low cost housing in a basic simple environment. It would solve much of the problems of loneliness of singles with people allowing to live
together with some interaction in common areas and dining together. It would be ideal for those who lost their mate and did not or could not afford the standard apartment or single housing of today. It could be the simple retirement home for those who have less to spend.

Also years ago, there were rooming houses which provided low cost rooms, not apartments, not hotel rooms but rooms with a shared bath down the hall . I stayed in a YMCA rooming house, a couple of nights, many decades ago. I remember seeing these rooming houses when I was young.

http://daily.sightline.org/2012/11/1...able-quarters/

There is an interesting type of care facility for the elderly which is called a Board and Care Home where a few elderly persons of need live in a small home with caregivers. They are licensed by the State. It could be said they are similar to a Boarding House.

For myself, I have lived in many types of housing from college dorms to Army barracks to a quonset hut in the Antarctic. With the shared lavatories, dining and common sitting rooms, I was perhaps much happier in these basic housing of my past.

I have lived in apartment, alone and shared. Now I live in my own detached single family home but is this housing of today applicable to all and in all situations. Is is necessary to have these expensive types of housing for a good quality of life.

Why does every type of housing have to be so large and more costly. We can go back to a time and live a simpler existence where our basic needs are met. We all do not need so much to have a place to live. When we have talked about living with parents or relatives because of financial problems, perhaps these common simple housing of the past can serve that need.

What do you all think?

Livecontent
G'morning, Livecontent!

Hope you're having a spectacular day!

I'm well familiar with boarding houses and wouldn't care for that kind of living arrangement - at all. Of course, we do what we must when circumstance dictates it, but as long as I have a choice in the matter I won't choose communal living. I like and need my privacy and would not be an asset to anyone living in a communal environment. I've helped out in many such places in my life and time, but it's definitely not for me - please God.

Mahrie.
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Old 04-25-2014, 01:06 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,540,747 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post
I had a few friends who lived in boarding houses in east Dallas back in the late 1960s. It worked out well enough for them but they were in their early 20s.
These were large 2 and 3 story homes; all the bedrooms were upstairs and each bathroom was shared by 4-5 roomers. They wouldn't have been at all suitable for frail seniors.

How many one story homes have enough bedrooms and baths to take in boarders?
This is a very good point.

A standard boarding home would not be taking frail seniors. It would not be ideal to accept them for housing as they are not a care facility. These seniors would be living in Assisted Living or Nursing Facilities. All the Bed and Board homes which are small care facilities for seniors that are considered Assisted Living locations are all on one floor.

However, many seniors do not work well with steps, as I have a mobility disorder but I am not frail. So, your point is well taken.

Livecontent
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Old 04-25-2014, 01:13 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,540,747 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mastequila View Post
No real NEED for a rooming house, but our area had a little boom that has since subsided, not died. I could probably re-fill with semi-transient workers. They were OK folk, really, no problem. Just curious about marketing toward a more permanent renter. I, too, live within 10 minutes of the property, and that's a'foot. But I work full time 50 miles away. Not cool when someone forgets their key or the internet goes down. The building is located right down town, and I use the term loosely. Very small town, with a lot of businesses relocated along the highway. I can't imagine not having a car, but a person could walk to most any business in town within 10-15 minutes. It's just that no one does. There's a senior center a block away. Minimal public transit.



Good points, and why I need a local manager. You can't count on guys to keep a community kitchen cleaned up. Somehow can't imagine hookers ever being a problem, but there's always something.



What great ideas, LC!
We do have several seasonal events that always find the motels filled, but no tourist attractions on a year round basis. My best bet is the transient workers I suspect. Darn the luck, there's no nearby university or I'd make it a frat house, lol.
I do find your OP on this kind of housing alternative interesting, though, and I'd like to pursue it, at least test the waters. I'm just not sure I can price it affordably enough in this economy.
If you go the HUD path, I believe HUD would decide the price structure based on the local market and subsidize you to a formalized need. If you change the property to non-profit that does not mean you loose control. It means that the entity that you establish owns the property but you can very well be that entity Operating Director and receive a salary for administration as determined by the non-profit board of directors that must be established.

A frat house--that is really funny. Might as well call it an Animal House...toga...toga...toga!

Livecontent
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Old 04-25-2014, 01:13 PM
 
Location: land of ahhhs
277 posts, read 298,129 times
Reputation: 489
Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post
I had a few friends who lived in boarding houses in east Dallas back in the late 1960s. It worked out well enough for them but they were in their early 20s.
These were large 2 and 3 story homes; all the bedrooms were upstairs and each bathroom was shared by 4-5 roomers. They wouldn't have been at all suitable for frail seniors.

How many one story homes have enough bedrooms and baths to take in boarders?
I should add, my building is one story and has one accessible entrance. Maybe I'll just move there myself, and leave the house with it's attendant bills to my kids.
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