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Old 04-26-2014, 05:13 PM
 
Location: University City, Philadelphia
22,592 posts, read 12,349,087 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
I lived in boarding houses from 1982-84 and in 1994. it is NOT a lifestyle that I would not want to return to.

The first problem is that you have ZERO control over who the landlord rents to. One of the places that I lived for a year was alright ... until one of the guys moved out. The landlord rented the place out to one of the local hookers and you can imagine the quality of life.

The second problem was the "shared" kitchen. If you wanted to use it, you had to clean up the mess that one of the slobs would leave EVERY NIGHT. No thanks.

Third, security is minimal as you do not know who has a key to your place.
Good points.

This is how I solve that problem:

1. The landlord (me) lives in the house, who keeps a vigilant eye on comings and goings.

2. The landlord insists on a thorough interview and requires local references. The tenant must be either employed (and the employer will be contacted for verification) or a Graduate student (and the grad student's faculty advisor is a reference. Sorry, no undergrads and no minors.)

3. At the point where the lease is signed the tenant and landlord, the tenant must also sign a list of the house rules. One rule is the kitchen must be kept "sp ic and span" ...

At the moment we are all mature guys late forties to late fifties, so it works.
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Old 04-26-2014, 05:43 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,554,912 times
Reputation: 6928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
The old railroad hotel in my home town has been converted into a SRO. There's probably a need since this is a poor rural area with lots of people in need of housing but not much money. I suspect most of the residents have alcohol and other drug issues, but I don't know. I don't believe any elderly people live there.

I think one of the reasons that SROs have disappeared except in very large, very expensive cities is because of subsidized senior and/or handicapped apartments. These are very common in Upstate NY. In fact, the old elementary school in my town was rehabbed and turned into subsidized senior housing. They rent for a maximum of 30% of income and include heat, water, electric, garbage, and sometimes basic cable, so somebody who only had $800 in SS would pay only $240 a month. If I were in straightened circumstances, I would consider moving into one.

Some of the senior facilities in this area offer levels of care other than simply ALF or SNF, ranging from stand alone bungalows and apartments for independent seniors who just don't want to bother with lawn work and home maintenance to seniors who just need help with meals or laundry or making sure they take their medications, etc.
I just realized that you are the one who had some little arguments about Denver and Buffalo over drought and water. You write so well and I remember I liked your very informative post about Buffalo. I can actually see Jamestown in my mind when you write since I have been there many times, so many years ago.

The senior subsidized housing are under section 202 of HUD. The developer is given funding to build these for low income seniors and the rent is graduated to income and assets. This is not Section 8 housing which is for the poor of all ages. This is low income senior only and disabled housing.

HUD - Multifamily Housing - Program Description

Here in the Denver area, there have been many built in recent years to meet the growing demand for senior housing and they look great. Here is an example of one in the older western suburbs of Lakewood, just past the city line. You would never think it is low income housing:
Residences at Creekside - Metro West Housing Solutions

I am looking to live in a senior only rental for my next move, perhaps not low income. I am disabled and it may come to the time when I will not be able to keep up my home. My home is increasing in value as it is within walking distance of a new commuter rail station under construction and I may just take the increased value and move. I may move into the City of Denver, if I can afford it as the demand for living in Denver is driving up prices. I like denser walkable areas with good public transit and I will no longer drive, though I could live here because there is excellent public transit all over the metro area. Our transit district covers 8 counties.

Metro Denver is suffering from a real housing crisis with extreme shortages of homes and apartments. Rents are rising dramatically and quickly. Homes sell within hours over the asking price. There is just not enough inventory to meet the demand for all who are moving into this area. I have never seen it like this before and I have been here going on 36 years.

So, there is a need for any and all types of housing. I have seen boarding houses in Denver and I can remember SROs many years ago, now that I know the term from your previous post. They were in older areas of Downtown of yesterday. Today Downtown Denver is so much different today as it has gone through explosive growth and these properties are gone as being much more valuable for development.

Livecontent
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Old 04-26-2014, 06:51 PM
 
20,793 posts, read 13,798,557 times
Reputation: 14480
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
The old railroad hotel in my home town has been converted into a SRO. There's probably a need since this is a poor rural area with lots of people in need of housing but not much money. I suspect most of the residents have alcohol and other drug issues, but I don't know. I don't believe any elderly people live there.

I think one of the reasons that SROs have disappeared except in very large, very expensive cities is because of subsidized senior and/or handicapped apartments. These are very common in Upstate NY. In fact, the old elementary school in my town was rehabbed and turned into subsidized senior housing. They rent for a maximum of 30% of income and include heat, water, electric, garbage, and sometimes basic cable, so somebody who only had $800 in SS would pay only $240 a month. If I were in straightened circumstances, I would consider moving into one.

Some of the senior facilities in this area offer levels of care other than simply ALF or SNF, ranging from stand alone bungalows and apartments for independent seniors who just don't want to bother with lawn work and home maintenance to seniors who just need help with meals or laundry or making sure they take their medications, etc.
Single Room Occupancy hotel rooms began disappearing here in NYC (mostly in Manhattan) starting back in the late 1970's under then mayor Ed Koch.

Mr. Koch had *VERY* close ties to the real estate lobby and his administration turned a blind eye when owners of SRO properties began to clear the places out of tenants because they wanted to develop luxury housing. The abuses were legendary and rampant with everything from hiring thugs to harass and even physically abuse tenants to literally tearing the place down around tenants who wouldn't leave.

Many of these SRO hotels were in what are now very fashionable high rent areas of the Upper Westside, Chelsea, The West Village, East Village, and other areas of Manhattan including in an ironic twist Chinatown and the Bowery.

One of the reasons there has been an explosion of homelessness in NYC is that without the option of SRO type accommodations those that cannot afford to rent an apartment end up on the streets. Back in the day someone living on say Social Security, Disability, a small pension or whatever that perhaps couldn't afford to rent an apartment could get a SRO room. This applied to "working" poor such as many of the elderly you see cobbling together various odd jobs to make a living.

Single room occupancy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

SRO's : Curbed NY

Could be wrong but think in San Francisco the last of SRO type housing is mainly located in the Tenderloin district, and there is a somewhat of a battle going on to preserve. To some the places are eyesores and attract crime, vice, the poor and everything else undesirable. To others the places represent the last bits of affordable low income/housing for the poor left in SF
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Old 04-26-2014, 07:13 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,554,912 times
Reputation: 6928
I forgot about one great property in Denver that was a SRO and was converted to to senior housing. It is the Barth Hotel

The Barth Hotel | Senior Housing Options

Get a look at this property and take this virtual tour
http://seniorhousingoptions.org/prop...ry/thumbnails/

This is from the page of this hotel's history:

"Purchased by Senior Housing Options in 1980 for $600,000 for use as single‐room occupancy residence for seniors being displaced by downtown development and demolition of single‐room hotels"

What is amazing about this property is that it was not in the best part of the city when it was purchased but development was moving in that direction. Now, it sits right there in the center of astounding development. It right down the street from the new Union Station redevelopment that will open in two weeks.

RTD
This is the centerpiece of the largest single development of expansion of public transit in the nation.

This property has now got to worth millions and it is the home of the disabled and low income seniors. It is really a very special old hotel that has been renewed. If it was in private hands, this would have been converted to a small luxury boutique hotel with an upscale restaurant.

So, SROs can be done right with the right people and the right investment.

I have been by this property and have gone inside many times. I have never heard of problems with any of the activities. I have seen and talked to the residents and they are extremely proud of their home and take a good effort to protect the property.

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 04-26-2014 at 07:31 PM..
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Old 04-27-2014, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
8,992 posts, read 7,762,382 times
Reputation: 12211
Much of this is a what can one afford situation. My wife and I once lived in a studio apartment that was 420sq ft. Lovely place. I could live there quite well myself.

I also see that building went condo and that same studio is selling for $250K. 29 Concord Avenue, Cambridge, MA.

Last edited by johngolf; 04-27-2014 at 03:09 PM..
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