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Old 05-09-2014, 04:28 PM
 
10,819 posts, read 8,071,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
How gloomy. Carrying around funeral and estate notification cards. Is there no one where you live who wouldn't know if you died "on the road"?

And I'd add a second credit card. Just in case. More likely you'll need a second credit card than a funeral card . Robyn
DH & I travel extensively, mostly by car. If we were to have an accident away from home, our funeral cards instruct to call our hometown funeral director (good friend of ours), who will work with our family to arrange to have our remains cremated and shipped home.
All our personal estate information, including will and trusts, inventory of assets, banking and checking information, etc., is on file with our estate management trust officer, who would arrange to release any funds needed, in the event we are both killed or incapacitated.
Both these are separate from our ICE instructions, which give family contact info.

DH's cousin lost her husband in an accident while vacationing in Hawaii; she was in a coma for a few weeks and the whole situation was traumatic for her family. Although they had substantial funds, the family was unable to access them. The red tape and expense of shipping the husband's body home was a nightmare. We learned from that experience.

I never carry both my credit cards on my person at the same time, in case I lose the wallet or am mugged. When traveling, one card is always in the car or at our rental.
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Old 05-09-2014, 11:30 PM
 
10,819 posts, read 8,071,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post
I never carry both my credit cards on my person at the same time, in case I lose the wallet or am mugged. When traveling, one card is always in the car or at our rental.
Just to add: biscuitpop carries his own 3 credit cards in his wallet and I nag him unmercifully about it, what's the point? I've told him once and again that we might both be mugged or pickpocketed, and it'll be my lone stray credit card that gets us home.
I was pickpocketed twice, back in the 1970s. If only then we'd have today's technology that enables us to access our CC#'s and report them as stolen.
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Old 05-10-2014, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,694 posts, read 33,709,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
livecontent's post in our gun discussion on what he has been advised to carry prompted me to start this thread. Older people should always have not only necessary medications but certain tools as well.

We've had several productive discussions regarding both carrying guns and carrying emergency or survival supplies in vehicles. It seems reasonable now to discuss what we should have on our persons at all times to make our lives safe and with as little inconvenience as possible. "EDC" simply means everyday carry; it's what you have in your pockets or securely attached to your clothing or body. This applies to women as well as men because purses can be lost or stolen. A vehicle is, of course, ideal for carrying necessities and conveniences, but we're not always with our vehicles. The question is what should we carry at all times. I'm not going to bother with wallets, keys, credit cards etc. Everyone carries these items; they require no comment.

I decided years ago that I would never dress around my gun. T-shirts and sport shirts hanging out are simply unacceptable to me; a gentleman does not wear a T-shirt or leave his shirt untucked anytime. I don't always wish to wear a jacket; reversed fanny packs are a dead give-away. But about twenty-five years ago made a very fortunate discovery. I was at a yard sale and saw three small pouches with both belt loops and carrying straps; I bought all three for a dollar. My initial thought was that they would be handy for carrying small items when hiking. Indeed they were, but their use was not limited to hiking. I found that one of the pouches worn on the belt is just the right size to hold a medium to large auto pistol without exciting any interest. There's an interior pocket which can hold extra magazines and other small items. Since there's a gun inside, however, these shouldn't be necessary items that may be needed in a publc place. This particular belt pack seems most useful when serving this dedicated function.

But what about other worthwhile items to carry. Every older person should carry aspirin to take immediately in the event of heart attack or stroke. Many health conditions require carrying specific medications. Then we have antiseptic wipes and first aid material. A medical alert necklace should present no problems; anyone who's alive has a neck. It can even share the neck with a knife or light gun suspended in a neck scabbard.

A keychain doesn't just work for keys. Mine sports a tiny Spyderco knife as well as two LRI flashlights, one red and one white. I keep the red between my two electronic door keys so I know which is which; I use the red when I can't disturb my night vision. The white LRI is brighter than my cell phone light and far more durable.

I'll describe now what I carry and how I do it; I hope you'll comment and share your methods. First, here's my list:

keys, change (which I rarely need), Chapstick, and fairly complete SAK (Swiss Army Knife) I keep these items loose in my left side pocket.

Smith & Wesson Model 638 This fits perfectly in my right side pocket. I generally restrict carrying the belt pouch I described to large cities, particularly those where I can't legally carry a gun. In that case, my Smith is either my primary or secondary BUG (backup gun). In chilly or cold weather I carry a Smith Model 649 in my right jacket pocket. It is just a touch larger than the other but has a stainless steel rather than an aluminum frame and is chambered for .357 magnum rather than .38 special.

If I'm wearing a jacket I carry my wallet in the left side pocket. Otherwise, I carry it in my left hip pocket when on foot or my center console when driving.

But there are other items I need. I carry bear spray when hiking but this thread is about urban kits. Backcountry kit discussions could fill hundreds of threads.

illuminated 5x magnifier
5-20x magnifier
30x illuminated magnifier
cell phone: small flip type
Kindle Paperwhite
Bic lighter (I don't smoke, however)
Zippo lighter fuel in small container (marvellous solvent)
extra ammo
needle nose pliers
duct tape

I've been replacing my regular chinos with cargo pants. LL Bean even makes some rather dressy examples. I use Maxpedition pocket organizers and small packs that are both Molle compatible and can be fitted with belt loops. Thet also fit well into lower cargo pants pockets. That's where I keep spare ammo as well.

Empty Altoids tins make fine little containers for pills, needles, wire etc.

Now, let's hear how you do it. What do you carry and how do you carry it? Let's make the unsafe world a bit less so during our twilight years.

I'm supplying a few links; follow the internal amazon links as well. youtube has a plethora of useful videos. Just search for Maxpedition and go from there.
Egads, I'm trying to lighten my load. You would, too of you had mobility issues.

With me: cell phone, cards/licenses (in a clear plastic badge holder), dollars and loose aspirin. Occasionally: Camera bag

In the car and stays in the car: first aid kit, OFF, bottle of Ibuprofen, sunglasses, eyeglass repair kit. bottle of aspirin, pens, change, nasal spray, pain spray, bottle of water, sun blocker, map book, wet wipes, gum. shovel, ice scraper, emergency car kit.
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Old 05-10-2014, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Florida
19,823 posts, read 19,921,769 times
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Reading some of these posts makes me wonder if I'd know, from the rear, whether the guy with his pants sagging down around his ass is 16 or 60.
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Old 05-10-2014, 12:19 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,584 posts, read 10,936,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Egads, I'm trying to lighten my load. You would, too of you had mobility issues.

With me: cell phone, cards/licenses (in a clear plastic badge holder), dollars and loose aspirin. Occasionally: Camera bag

I had both hips replaced. I waited way too long because I thought it was worsening arthritis. I was a mess for several months before and more than six months after surgery. I'm still working to get my endurance back.

People using a walker or two canes can't carry much if anything in their hands or race back to their cars for needed items. A little pouch that weighs almost nothing, however, allows a cripple (that's how I referred to myself) to bring a Kindle into a restaurant without someone else's help. Besides, being self-suffcient can't hurt.

I just did lighten my load. I bought a new SAK that has both scissors and pliers; I removed my large pliers from EDC. I did add a small and nifty pry bar, however.

Pry bars are available on amazon, the SAK as well. ebay sellers have better prices, but beware of counterfeits. I always read amazon reviews before I buy.

This is what I bought. I've also posted a link to my biggest SAK at the bottom. Belt cases are available. I love to play with it in restaurants full of tourists.

Now get on that computer and shop until you drop, oldsters.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...=ATVPDKIKX0DER

Amazon.com: Victorinox Swiss Army Swiss Champ Pocket Knife (Red): Sports & Outdoors

Amazon.com : Victorinox Swiss Army SwissChamp XAVT : Folding Camping Knives : Sports & Outdoors
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Old 05-13-2014, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,305,504 times
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In my left front pocket, I have a folding magnifying glass at all times, helps me read labels in the supermarket and other fine print. Right front pocket, cash, making sure there is always enough change for the bus fare along with at least 50 bucks, sometimes I meet strangers who are a little short of cash and I try to help out. Right rear pocked, a couple of plastic bags and paper napkins, never know when those will come in handy.

If I'm going to the store, I slip my credit card in my shirt pocket. If I'm going to the library, it's my library card. It keeps my mind sharp to remember which one. No other forms of ID or documentation, I don't get carded any more, and nobody argues with me when I ask for senior discount. I don't think the police here have the right (yet) to demand to see ID on the street and arrest me if I don't have it, and I don't go to Arizona on the spur of the moment very often.

That covers everything. I never go out after dark, so no need for any flashlights. I don't own a cellphone or metal detector or any other portable battery-operated device, and don't expect to need one. No watch, I can ask somebody else what time it is. I never lock my door, and I don't drive, so I don't need to carry any keys. It's been a long time since I've needed to kill any people, so a device designed only to do that seems pretty superfluous. I carried a jackknife in my pocket every day for over 60 years, but nowadays that is considered armed and dangerous, and can lead to needless complications if there is a misunderstanding, and people don't understand very much anymore.
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Old 05-14-2014, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Northern IL
241 posts, read 226,988 times
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Actually we think about being prepared. All cares have first aid kits and minimal survival stuff, especially in cold weather.

When walking the dogs in FL last week and hanging out in the park near the lake we were more than interested to hear a few stories of some aggressive alligators and dogs. Many of the locals carry while with their pets near water.

Once I have my CCW there I while have to consider carrying while walking the dogs. In the north I carry in the woods on my property for bear and wolves.
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Old 05-14-2014, 07:41 AM
 
10,819 posts, read 8,071,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jack_pine View Post
When walking the dogs in FL last week and hanging out in the park near the lake we were more than interested to hear a few stories of some aggressive alligators and dogs. Many of the locals carry while with their pets near water.

Once I have my CCW there I while have to consider carrying while walking the dogs. In the north I carry in the woods on my property for bear and wolves.
I'd think one would need a powerful-caliber weapon, nerves of steel, and exceptionally good aim to shoot and stop a bear or alligator that's charging like a freight train.

For those of us who don't have those, bear spray seems a better option - for gators, bears and wolves. Are wolves really a threat?
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Old 05-14-2014, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Northern IL
241 posts, read 226,988 times
Reputation: 481
I don't think the wolves are that much of a daily threat but our property is in the middle of one of the active packs and we have seen tracks. There are hunting dogs lost every year while training for bear hunting. Yotes don't scare me, bores, maybe.

I don't know about nerves of steal as much as a lot of training. Hard to say how it would turn out if it ever happened but would rather have the option. It would be a tough shot for sure but I would not give up my pet with a fight. She carries the spray up north. First, however, we do everything possible to avoid the risk (not walking at waters edge in FL, etc.).

I carry a 454 casull caliber in the north country. In FL they say they shoot them with .357 to put them down in trapping season (locals comments).
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Old 05-14-2014, 01:39 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,584 posts, read 10,936,973 times
Reputation: 19234
Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post
I'd think one would need a powerful-caliber weapon, nerves of steel, and exceptionally good aim to shoot and stop a bear or alligator that's charging like a freight train.

For those of us who don't have those, bear spray seems a better option - for gators, bears and wolves. Are wolves really a threat?
Bear spray is far more effective than a gun when dealing with bears. But nerves of steel are helpful. If a grizzly charges there's a 99% chance that he'll break off the charge. But you can't turn and run; you need to stand your ground. Black bears are far more unpredictable. If a black bear attacks you must fight immediately. Bear experts recommend that you give a grizzly a little time to stop on his own. The only bear (too far away to determine species) I've ever seen on my property took off when I called my younger dog; my older one believed in discretion.

There is no record of a grizzly's attacking three or more in a group. That includes dogs. People are always advised to walk quietly if they wish to see wildlife. Wild animals, including bear, don't like noise. Most wild animals will take off at the sound of a gunshot; you don't need to hurt them.

There is no record in this country of a wolf attack on a human; they never come close enough to use bear spray.

There was a man walking hs dog one dark night in Colorado when something grabbed his dog. He hit the animal hard on its back and it ran. He then realized that he'd run off a mountain lion. Don't jog in lion country; they are drawn to running prey.

Never get between a mother moose and her calf; if she's standing where you planned to go, go somewhere else. Bulls are harmless except during rutting season.
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