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Old 05-04-2014, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,684 posts, read 49,455,573 times
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Old 05-04-2014, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,176 posts, read 8,696,248 times
Reputation: 6194
Smile You hit it on the head, I think

Quote:
Originally Posted by JBtwinz View Post
It's all a numbers game which can be interpreted in so many different ways.

For me as a federal worker the last ten years have been doom and gloom over the prospect of most of the work force leaving in increasing numbers......it is now happening with greater frequency and this year we are rapidly losing people mid year rather than at years end. In the next three years at my location we stand to have a very detrimental brain drain. Those of us that have years of trade related experience (craftsmen and women) are not being replaced with qualified people. We have plenty of newbies in their twentys but it jumps to late fiftys and sixties crafts people.

Sixty two seems to be the magic number from what I can see and again we are running out of people to promote.......sounds crazy but with trades a lot of promotions came from those with experience who could walk the walk and talk the talk. Sometimes those not qualified received promotions, but those working for them had the knowledge to carry out the tasks virtually unsupervised. That's not the case now and it is getting kind of scary. You can only train so much......those with the years of knowledge have so much tribal knowledge that can not be picked up from books, but by on the job experience.
This is kind of what I was trying to get at - the brain drain - tons of people leaving their longtime jobs over the next 3-5 years is definitely going to have an impact. You are seeing people born from 1948 to 1955 thinking seriously about the next move and many will decide to retire/do something else and that could be why we're seeing the numbers leaving.

I keep seeing more and more names in the news leaving their high level positions and then, it's human nature - don't you think about it yourself?

Curmie said it - there's a loyalty and a work ethic that exists in the older group. Now, some of us have children that have inherited it. That's one thing I can say about my children - they both have very strong work ethics and are loyal. But, it's hard.

What I have seen personally is some people leaving their jobs but going out and doing something else - for example - a woman I know was tops in her field prior to leaving and starting volunteering at a non-profit - and is now employed as their marketing director and she has taken that non-profit to #7 in our state (totally different line of work for her; she loves it; who knew?)
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Old 05-04-2014, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,587 posts, read 17,574,904 times
Reputation: 27677
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post
This is kind of what I was trying to get at - the brain drain - tons of people leaving their longtime jobs over the next 3-5 years is definitely going to have an impact. You are seeing people born from 1948 to 1955 thinking seriously about the next move and many will decide to retire/do something else and that could be why we're seeing the numbers leaving.

I keep seeing more and more names in the news leaving their high level positions and then, it's human nature - don't you think about it yourself?

Curmie said it - there's a loyalty and a work ethic that exists in the older group. Now, some of us have children that have inherited it. That's one thing I can say about my children - they both have very strong work ethics and are loyal. But, it's hard.

What I have seen personally is some people leaving their jobs but going out and doing something else - for example - a woman I know was tops in her field prior to leaving and starting volunteering at a non-profit - and is now employed as their marketing director and she has taken that non-profit to #7 in our state (totally different line of work for her; she loves it; who knew?)
Yes, this brain drain will have some impact, but I doubt it's going to be as significant as you expect.

First, how many jobs really require years upon years of experience to be competent? Other than master craftsmen, medical doctors, senior management, leading edge scientists, etc, the vast majority of regular jobs can probably be mastered in a couple of years, if that.

Second, the reason that the brain drain may be significant is that employers have mostly refused to train the next generation. By taking advantage of economically damaged, but still experienced, older workers, companies have been able to get "champagne quality on a beer budget." When these older workers have to retire, companies will be constantly be harping about the "lack of qualified personnel" when they refused to train the next generation in the first place. They are taking advantage of poor economic conditions and a demographic age bias in favor of older workers at the expense of having a qualified supply of workers tomorrow.

Your "work ethic" comment is both unverifiable and simply rude. There have always been people content with doing the minimum to get by. There have always been moochers. For many of my generation, there is simply no decent work available for them. They are stuck in junk jobs because there are few quality jobs available overall. Perhaps their location, like my hometown, remains in the economic doldrums and isn't recovering. Perhaps they wanted to go to college and get training in a decent field, but could not afford it due to skyrocketing education costs. I know quite a few intelligent and capable people a few years younger than me in their early 20s who simply could not afford an education being from east TN and are stuck waiting tables, in call centers, in retail, etc. This isn't a question of "work ethic" - but rather a financial handicap that prevents them from doing better.
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Old 05-04-2014, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
1,660 posts, read 1,525,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
What I'm noticing is that many of the 50+ crowd who were laid off in 2007-2010 have taken lower paying, lower end jobs than they had before. They are desperately hanging on until they get SS, turn 59.5, or to some other milestone. They are not worried about career growth and are meekly settling for what they have now.
My 61 year old brother lost his accounting job in January. His employer slowly replaced all of the older accountants with younger personnel. He's planning to live off unemployment for the next few months and switch to social security when he turns 62 later this year. Just live cheap and try to maximize his investments to supplement social security. And hope he does not get sick. Then my nephew's wife just got informed that her employer, a major airline, is transferring her department out of state so she may be out of a job soon at 50 years old and 28 years with the company. Without a college degree, she doubts that she will find another job that pays as much. And both live in Texas.
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Old 05-04-2014, 08:24 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,806 posts, read 54,470,896 times
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I have a brother in law that recently retired at 60, to avoid a transfer to another state. Other than that, all the people I know in their 60s are still working, and one is planning to go in 2015 at 66. Most of us are talking about 68-70.
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Old 05-05-2014, 05:30 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,144,092 times
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In my demographic (people in their 50s) only super successful people willingly leave the work force. The others are getting "early retired" against their will. Then there are those who got laid off when they were still in their 40s, never found anything to replace what they lost, and are either long term unemployed or underemployed neither of which get counted in the stats.

I hope I get to retire someday and by that I mean a real retirement somewhere after "the retirement age."
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Old 05-05-2014, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Florida -
8,764 posts, read 10,845,692 times
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"Older Adults: Leaving the workplace"

What am I missing here? That would only be unexpected or new in this generation or economy ... if younger people with families and less savings were instead the ones to leaving the workplace.
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Old 05-06-2014, 07:17 AM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,176 posts, read 8,696,248 times
Reputation: 6194
Smile I didn't word it very well, I guess

It seems lately there is more talk of those leaving the workforce than say, five years ago. All of a sudden, there seems to be more of an exodus.

I personally think there are more retiring and taking part time or fun type jobs (self employed in a hobby that you always wanted to do) than you think.

If you are already retired, do you feel you have more friends etc. joining you?

If you are still working, are you the "only one left" and is there a group that in 10 years will be gone?

Does it make a difference if those around retire and you're not sure, does that play a part?

Isn't there a statistic out there that 10,000 people a day are turning 62 or 65? Eventually, more will leave the work force.
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Old 05-06-2014, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
3,415 posts, read 5,136,795 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post

Isn't there a statistic out there that 10,000 people a day are turning 62 or 65? Eventually, more will leave the work force.

Yes, about 10,000 people a day turn 65 and that will continue until the end of 2030 when the last of the boomers reach that age.

I have no idea what percentage of them will retire upon reaching 65, be it voluntary or not. I would guess that many will continue in the work force until they reach 66 - full retirement age for SS.
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Old 05-06-2014, 09:52 AM
 
741 posts, read 641,725 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post
Do you find more of your friends or colleagues are leaving the workforce or retiring?
No. Not at all.
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