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Old 05-05-2014, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Sierra Nevada Land, CA
8,393 posts, read 9,139,362 times
Reputation: 13031

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post

3. California is also a huge state geographically with different climates and different population densities.

4. Crime rates: A given state's overall crime rate is meaningless in the sense of actually living in that state. It is the crime rate in one's own neighborhood that counts.
I live in CA. We get snow, the median home price is $170K, no crime, no smog. What is CA? Most of it (90%+) is rural and does not have beaches or palm trees. Gotta love sterotypes!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post
I'd like to know where the heck they collected their "Average humidity" from.

61.4 for California.

Hogwash!
Our summertime humidity runs between 10%-20%

South Dakota #1??? Not for me. Been there. I guess if all that matters is the COL then move to SD or ND. Me? I'd rather be happy.

Last edited by Mr5150; 05-05-2014 at 09:38 PM..
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Old 05-06-2014, 05:05 AM
 
5,822 posts, read 13,313,859 times
Reputation: 9290
Agree with Escort Rider. There are so many variables, ranking states doesn't make sense. As stated upstate NY is completely different than NYC and downstate. Our criteria was being happy and affordable for us. Just because a place has low housing prices and COL doesn't mean you're going to be happy living there. It's a personal decision.
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Old 05-06-2014, 05:30 AM
 
Location: Texas or Cascais, Portugal
3,415 posts, read 3,181,516 times
Reputation: 8270
The main issue I have with this story is that it does not address whether the "top 10 states" tax social security and pensions. For me, that's far more important than sales and other taxes and I couldn't care less about crime.
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Old 05-06-2014, 06:04 AM
 
Location: No. Virginia, USA
328 posts, read 476,616 times
Reputation: 317
Quote:
Originally Posted by djplourd View Post
2014s Best Places to Retire: How Your State Ranks | Bankrate.com

Bankrate ranked all 50 states according to their cost of living, crime rate (violence and property crimes), health care quality, state and local tax burden, personal well-being and weather. The overall ranks of 1 to 50 go from best to worst. Below is the data we selected to come up with our state rankings for retirement

Read more: 2014s Best Places to Retire: How Your State Ranks | Bankrate.com
Follow us: @Bankrate on Twitter | Bankrate on Facebook

They also have slide shows of the 10 worst states 10 Worst States For Retirement | Bankrate.com and the ten best states 10 Best States For Retirement | Bankrate.com

I'm please to say that my state, VA ranks a solid #10

The 10th-best state for retirement is also the one exception on this list. Virginia, the only coastal state in the top 10, received above-average scores for all the criteria considered in this ranking.

That means the Old Dominion State would be a good place to live for retirees on a tight budget: It taxes residents at a lower rate, and its cost of living is below average. Virginia also has a relatively low crime rate, and it receives better-than-average scores when it comes to health care quality, weather and surveys of personal wellness.

With that in mind, the state tourism department may want to add to its "Virginia is for lovers" slogan with another sobriquet: "Virginia is for retirees, too."
The cost of living in Northern Va. (Arlington, Fairfax) aint a bargain, especially housing! Not to mention the congestion. I'm looking to get out of here.
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Old 05-06-2014, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,925,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldenage1 View Post
I am sorry they did not include average temperature in the rankings. South Dakota is the #1 rated state. It may have low crime, good health care, low cost of living and low humidity. However it is as cold as h**l in the winter.
That was the first thing that struck me about the list as well. Note that I once spent a winter traveling through the Rocky Mountain states. It was a beautiful interesting part of the country to visit. But to live there permanently now - almost 30 years later? No way for me.

I also agree with Escort Rider about large states. Especially one the size of Texas. We've taken 2 trips to Texas in the last 6 years or so. One to Dallas/Fort Worth and Austin and the other to Houston. Three very different metro areas. We also drove across the state one year - end to end. Places like Lubbock don't have much in common with places like San Antonio. Even here in Florida - where our weather variations aren't as great as those in Texas - there are many different kinds of places to live. Miami and Destin don't have much in common. Robyn
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Old 05-06-2014, 07:31 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
12,764 posts, read 7,822,070 times
Reputation: 13083
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
Well.... yet another 'rank' ranking...

Nebraska? Yes, "It's the Good Life", but... Huge taxes and burden to their criteria... 'fixed income'?

Wyoming? Have they priced Obamacare in WY!. Obama hates WY and it shows in their rates! (But it is a great state to retire... and even greater if you need a place for eldercare (Pioneer Home)).
The rates in Wyoming may be high because there's just not much of anything in Wyoming in the way of services, public or private.

Obamacare, or the ACA, does not set rates in individual states.
I won't even address the silly statement that Obama hates Wyoming..

I think the Politics and Other Controversies forum is where you want to be posting.
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Old 05-06-2014, 07:42 AM
 
10,322 posts, read 9,374,600 times
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Ridiculous ranking since there are multiple variables in every state; and where one state may rate high according to their categories, the weather may be so terrible that it should be at the bottom of the list.
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Old 05-06-2014, 08:05 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,154,265 times
Reputation: 22373
My thoughts are basically the same as the majority of posters thus far.

In my own state of NC, weather varies greatly, from the coast to the piedmont/foothills and then the mountains.

The only value of a per-state listing would be to focus on state laws that would affect retirees, i.e. tax cuts or breaks for seniors or pension funds, state-wide initiatives that apply exclusively to seniors, homestead laws, Medicare/healthcare providers and accessibility, car registration costs (or breaks in insurance for seniors), etc.

I have found that the cost of living charts don't always tell the whole story, per state, per city, because such things as car registration fees and insurance, "hidden" useage taxes, gas tax, toll roads, home insurance, flood insurance, earthquake insurance, etc are not always considered. In NC, we tax food and that is something that doesn't occur in many states. These things are important when making decisions that are - at least in part - cost driven.

Then there are the "quality of life" issues. Just because one might be able to find cheap housing in a state (perhaps - only in certain areas!), that doesn't mean it will be a situation amenable to most seniors. Crime is only one part of the story. Secondary roads? Road conditions in bad weather? Natural disaster frequency (earthquakes, tornadoes, flash floods, hurricanes, forest fires) and evacuation routes . . .

Access to healthcare, groceries, mass transit, free or inexpensive entertainment, green space . . . all those things are local local local.

So unless a ranking is based on strictly financial considerations, and then one culls out the possibilities after deciding that a state offers senior benefits, tax breaks, lower cost of living . . . I don't think these rankings are based on very meaningful (to seniors) criteria.
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Old 05-06-2014, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Boise, ID
8,043 posts, read 23,715,811 times
Reputation: 9334
I'm glad to see Idaho clear down at number 8. That's the lowest I've seen us in a long time. I keep hoping these lists will stop telling people what a great place this is to live, so more people will stop moving here.

Idaho is awful people, don't move here. Ignore any information you find to the contrary.

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Old 05-06-2014, 08:19 AM
 
3,438 posts, read 4,730,713 times
Reputation: 5402
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I am hardly original with the following thought; in fact I and others have posted it in other threads. The thought is that variations within any given state are large enough that ranking the states as a whole is nonsense. Maybe very small states (Rhode Island comes to mind) may be exceptions. Some examples:

1. Texas is a huge state geographically and has two basic and very different climates; if you draw a north-south line just west of Austin, to the east of that line is a very humid climate much like that of Louisiana, whereas to the west of the line is a much drier climate, sort of semi-desert.

2. New York state: living in upstate New York is a very different animal than living in New York City or Long Island.

3. California is also a huge state geographically with different climates and different population densities.

4. Crime rates: A given state's overall crime rate is meaningless in the sense of actually living in that state. It is the crime rate in one's own neighborhood that counts.

5. Taxes: In many states, property taxes are set locally, which means by counties and/or cities. In a given location, even fairly high state income tax rates can be trumped by even higher property taxes. Or a high tax in one case can be offset by a low one in the other case.

Rating individual cities for retirement, even with all the pitfalls connected with those ratings, is better than rating states overall, in my opinion.

( #4)..........a state crime rate is totally meaningless statistic that is a waste of time even computing.

About as meaningless as the average temperature in the United States.
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