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Old 05-07-2014, 09:42 PM
 
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(another tidbit),,,,,,,,,,,I only attended two class reunions but my older sister attended every one of hers.( our school graduated around 40 per year)

In both her class and mine, there were a couple kids in high school who were real popular but never came to a reunion .

People who did have contact with them said they stated their high school years had unpleasant memories and that was a part of their past they would just as soon forget.

Sure had us fooled when they were in high school and seemed to be the " big wheels "
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Old 05-08-2014, 04:51 AM
 
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Default Our HS 50th reunion will be in 2016

I went to the 10th and it was fun, then my friend talked me into a 15th that was very awkward--one guy who was so rude and ugly to everyone in school tried to drunkenly kiss me. After that, I would not go. My friend has really pressured me, as she is usually involved on the planning committee, but I'm adamant! No, no, a thousand times No! For our 30th, she begged and begged and finally admitted she wanted me to go because her husband didn't want to go and she didn't want to walk in the door alone! Of course, after my divorce, it was okay for ME to go by myself!

I wish all my classmates well and don't think I had enemies, but as others have said, if you haven't kept in touch in all these years, why now?!
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Old 05-08-2014, 05:43 AM
 
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I probably won't attend. I went to my 20th which was phenomenal! Twenty years seemed to be about right, everyone was at the top of their game, and I rekindled relationships that lasted for decades. I went back for the 25th and it was disappointing, maybe it was the economy because everyone seemed downtrodden. I'm pretty connected on facebook so I'll take a pass but it won't be until 2017 so who knows, I might change my mind.
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Old 05-08-2014, 07:02 AM
 
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Did not attend.
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Old 05-08-2014, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Glenbogle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
$100.00 seems extremely pricey to me
For my area that's standard for anything that's held at any kind of a venue, unless it's a wedding and if so, you can double that per-person figure easily. It's pretty much a given that when you're invited to a wedding at a "place", a $200 wedding-gift check will cover the cost of your seat/plate with little or nothing left over.

When my son got married last year it cost them $180/person AFTER they got a discount because my DIL used to work at the place during summers while she was in college. If that hadn't been the case they'd have paid more.

IIRC, there were about 700 in my graduating class. Maybe 750. I do recall that at the picnic the day after the reunion, someone brought a yearbook and a group of us paged through it to see if anyone knew about some of the people who weren't there. It was sad to hear so many mentions of "he was killed in Vietnam" about so many of the guys.

At that first (10yr) reunion I think about 300-400 people attended. When I went to the 30th there may have been a couple hundred at most.

I agree with the poster who said that after exchanging the usual pleasantries and banal Q&A about where you live/what you do/how many kids(grandkids) there is usually little or nothing to say. Gets real old, real quick, LOL
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Old 05-08-2014, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Glenbogle
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Here's a question: When you went to your reunions, especially the later ones (10+) did you find that the girls who were considered the most attractive ones in highschool did or did not "age well"? ;-)

Because one thing I noticed when I went to mine was that the gals who at 17 or 18 looked like flashy 21's (to the envy of little mice such as myself, LOL) and were often rather, er, voluptuous ;-) .... really did NOT age very well a few decades down the road, LOL. Whereas many of the girls who were never given a second look in highschool often looked absolutely great in their 30s and beyond.

Last edited by Never2L8; 05-08-2014 at 08:24 AM..
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Old 05-08-2014, 08:08 AM
 
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Originally Posted by StressedOutNYer View Post
Here's a question: When you went to your reunions, especially the later ones (10+) did you find that the girls who were considered the most attractive ones in highschool did or did not "age well"? ;-)

Because one think I noticed when I went to mine was that the gals who at 17 or 18 looked like flashy 21's (to the envy of little mice such as myself, LOL) and were often rather, er, voluptuous ;-) .... really did NOT age very well a few decades down the road, LOL. Whereas many of the girls who were never given a second look in highschool often looked absolutely great in their 30s and beyond.
Yes indeed !
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Old 05-08-2014, 09:23 AM
 
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One thing to consider, for those of you who are wavering re attending big-number reunions: If you don't go, you may find yourself with lots of unanswered questions and regrets later. Whereas if you do attend, it may be wonderful, or it may be a dud of an experience, leaving you either happy that you went, or chalking up the less-than-great experience as just one of those things from which to move on and leave behind.

But you'll never know - unless you go. Remember, your presence may be part of what makes the reunion special for others - you're not there just to be entertained or to absorb whatever's happening - you're there to be part of it yourself and to provide your own input.

Yes, some folks typically don't want to share much more than career and grandchild info. That's fine, and that's on the safe side, usually. Such social niceties are socially acceptable and have their place at such events. But I'd recommend involving yourself in somewhat deeper conversations with those classmates that seem open to such and appear to be interesting people, who may have followed unexpected paths in the last fifty years.

Typically they're not the ones who drew acclaim fifty years ago, and they're much more interesting for it. Get to know these people - the creative, off-beat ones who didn't fit into the neat little high school student mold way back when, and who found themselves years later. Find out what makes them tick, who they are now and how they got there.

In my own high school, a rather shy boy from a year behind me became a CIA agent. Another, a good-looking jock sort, went into the military and rose to the highest ranks. A reasonably popular, bright but not very well-heeled girl now teaches college, has a farm, and raises a rather distinct sort of farm animals, having successfully reared her only child with her physician husband. Another girl overcame serious physical special needs to achieve great recognition and respect in her field. A former straight-arrow band member went the flower child route, then wound up being a highly successful craftsman and creative artist.

These are the people you'll be glad you got to know better. Nothing wrong with talking with the former high school stars who are still doing well - that's great - but the ones who've overcome and/or achieved outside the foreseeable fields are far more interesting.
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Old 05-08-2014, 09:43 AM
 
10,495 posts, read 8,419,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StressedOutNYer View Post
For my area that's standard for anything that's held at any kind of a venue, unless it's a wedding and if so, you can double that per-person figure easily. It's pretty much a given that when you're invited to a wedding at a "place", a $200 wedding-gift check will cover the cost of your seat/plate with little or nothing left over.

When my son got married last year it cost them $180/person AFTER they got a discount because my DIL used to work at the place during summers while she was in college. If that hadn't been the case they'd have paid more.

IIRC, there were about 700 in my graduating class. Maybe 750. I do recall that at the picnic the day after the reunion, someone brought a yearbook and a group of us paged through it to see if anyone knew about some of the people who weren't there. It was sad to hear so many mentions of "he was killed in Vietnam" about so many of the guys.

At that first (10yr) reunion I think about 300-400 people attended. When I went to the 30th there may have been a couple hundred at most.

I agree with the poster who said that after exchanging the usual pleasantries and banal Q&A about where you live/what you do/how many kids(grandkids) there is usually little or nothing to say. Gets real old, real quick, LOL
Getting a bit off-topic here, but I've read similar accounts of guests at weddings in your area being somewhat expected to shell out monetary "wedding gifts" in order to "cover the cost of the plate",a notion which seems alien to me and is unheard of here in the Upper South.

There's nothing wrong with giving the happy couple a check, but most wedding gifts in my area, especially for young couples who are just starting out, tend to be household items, linens, kitchenware, silver, china, family heirlooms, things from the couples' list at various local stores, and so on, and guests are not expected to "cover the cost of their plate" at all.

To throw an elaborate and costly wedding reception and expect guests to pay for it just seems wrong to me - a reception should be a celebration and guests should be there because they add to the happiness of the couple and the occasion. In my opinion, the happy, hosting couple (and perhaps their families) should have the kind of reception they can afford - if this means a church hall with homemade punch and a modest cake, using Grandma's candelabra and flowers from Aunt Julia's garden, sobeit. To me, that's far more appropriate than expecting guests to chip in, or to go into debt right at the start of the marriage to cover the costs of an elaborately showy party that lasts a few hours at best.

I'm sure my opinion would be unpopular with some, but modest receptions seem far more "fitting" to me than big blow-outs. Of course, if the family and couple are well-off, they can throw whatever kind of reception they can afford. Just don't expect the guests to pay for it, either way! Ditto the trend towards "destination weddings". While getting married on a faraway tropical beach sounds delightful in many ways, to expect all the invited guests to attend seems - well, a little entitled.

Back to the subject at hand: class reunions are different, as the classmates are the celebrants. This being so, they should expect to pay for their share of the reunion, and if the costs appear exhorbitant, certainly relay this to the reunion organizers. An option would be for the reunion to include separately priced, even a few free activities: Can't afford the banquet? Attend the meet and greet or the picnic. Can't make it to the meet and greet or farewell brunch? Go to the banquet. And so on.

I do recognize that costs (and customs) vary in different regions of the country. Again, having a classmate with a country club membership has benefitted my own reunion planning committee enormously, and is helping to keep the price down. Arranging group rates at a nearby hotel also helps those coming from out of town who no longer have local family. Being willing to shoot our whole wad on remaining expenses is also a bonus in keeping things affordable.

Each case is going to differ, obviously, but there are ways to economize, both for the planners and those potential attendees.
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Old 05-08-2014, 10:33 AM
 
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A friend of mine went to his 50th last year, excited about seeing all the fun gang again, only to find none of them were there, but their grandparents were! lol
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