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Old 05-12-2014, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
9,013 posts, read 7,774,270 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Longford View Post
Speaking of condominium associations, I've lived under such governance and I've seen the Declarations of many other associations ... and each has clearly outlined how the relationships work legally. A problem is I think relatively few prospective buyers take the time to read the organizational documents, review the financial statements, understand the rules and regulations ... before buying.
I agree.
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Old 05-12-2014, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,953,845 times
Reputation: 6718
Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
A development with an attached golf course(s) can be very tricky. The ownership of the golf course has to be paid close attention to. Many times the course is owned by a different corporation then the developer of the housing is. In some cases it can be the same "person" but under different corporations. The golf course might not always be there or the ownership could change thus changing any prior arrangements like dues, playing times, etc. What one thought was going to be private for member/owners gets thrown open to the public. Worst case it goes broke and ends up being sold for another use like housing, stores, etc.

I bought a townhome on a golf course with the promise that the club would remain private as it was. After all the units were sold, the club went public. I learned that lesson fast.

There are many situations concerning the golf course ranging from being sold out from under for development to the HOA owning the course but going broke because of it.

I do not have an answer as there are many variations. All I can say is be very careful when a golf course is involved even if you do not play golf. For those basing their decision on wanting a golf course, then be twice as careful.
Living in Florida - I've seen many variations on these themes in various developments. But have never been involved in any of the messes.* I personally would not buy into a development based on the assumption that a course in that development would always be available to me on the terms that existed when I bought. Also - I'd never buy a house on a golf course. In addition to not wanting strangers traipsing through my back yard - there's no guarantee that a course in good repair will remain in good repair - or - in many cases - a guarantee that it will always be a golf course. Robyn

*The closest I've gotten to a mess is what's going on in my old condo in Miami - the one I left almost 20 years ago. It's a potential disaster for whoever now owns our old condo (unobstructued bay view might disappear). The litigation will probably go on for years.

Preserve Grove Isle | Grove Isle — Coconut Grove — Miami
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Old 05-13-2014, 01:20 PM
 
5,372 posts, read 5,666,068 times
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Sadly, I have seen/heard of too many who inherited a home in Florida - only to find out that the single/double wide is on rented/leased land. And that nice new mobile home is now 17 years old and almost worthless.

So skip the leased land developments.

And the HOA's. You have the governing board and then you have the "volunteers" who drive around seeking out violations - to report to the governing board.

Purchase a regular home on a city street - or just rent.
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Old 05-13-2014, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
9,013 posts, read 7,774,270 times
Reputation: 12257
Quote:
Originally Posted by unit731 View Post
Sadly, I have seen/heard of too many who inherited a home in Florida - only to find out that the single/double wide is on rented/leased land. And that nice new mobile home is now 17 years old and almost worthless.

So skip the leased land developments.

And the HOA's. You have the governing board and then you have the "volunteers" who drive around seeking out violations - to report to the governing board.

Purchase a regular home on a city street - or just rent.
And the HOA's. You have the governing board and then you have the "volunteers" who drive around seeking out violations - to report to the governing board.

The BOD does not have to listen to them nor take any action unless they want to. One reason I like association living is the ability to take action if needed. I do not want Ralph the Junkman having a junkyard near me. Not that you are Ralph, but ride around and look. There are plenty of them.
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Old 05-14-2014, 05:31 AM
 
29,819 posts, read 34,907,142 times
Reputation: 11735
Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
And the HOA's. You have the governing board and then you have the "volunteers" who drive around seeking out violations - to report to the governing board.

The BOD does not have to listen to them nor take any action unless they want to. One reason I like association living is the ability to take action if needed. I do not want Ralph the Junkman having a junkyard near me. Not that you are Ralph, but ride around and look. There are plenty of them.
Bada Bing, I want the neighboring lots to look good also. Don't many if not most want attractive neighborhood curb appeal?
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Old 05-14-2014, 06:23 AM
 
Location: Columbia SC
9,013 posts, read 7,774,270 times
Reputation: 12257
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
Bada Bing, I want the neighboring lots to look good also. Don't many if not most want attractive neighborhood curb appeal?
While most if not all want such, they can also be the first to say but I will not live somewhere where I can be told not to do certain things. It is my land. All well and good until Ralph the Junkman moves in.........LOL

Check this out:

http://www.joespc.com/carlos/redneck.htm

Last edited by johngolf; 05-14-2014 at 06:33 AM..
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Old 05-14-2014, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,953,845 times
Reputation: 6718
Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
And the HOA's. You have the governing board and then you have the "volunteers" who drive around seeking out violations - to report to the governing board.

The BOD does not have to listen to them nor take any action unless they want to. One reason I like association living is the ability to take action if needed. I do not want Ralph the Junkman having a junkyard near me. Not that you are Ralph, but ride around and look. There are plenty of them.
We don't have volunteers. We have committees (usually one or more officers are on the committees) that do "walk arounds" once or twice a year. Very organized.

As for buying a "regular house" on a "city street" - we're not a city (just an unincorporated town) - and the house that's been described will often come without "city water" (you'll have a well) or sewers (you'll have a septic tank). Not my idea of a good time - might be someone else's.

I think the virtues of a HOA can easily been seen by riding around my town. There is one long road that runs along the intracoastal waterway. Expensive waterfront property. And the houses in that area that aren't in a HOA - well you have one new lovely multi-million house next door to a doublewide or a falling down 40 year old house - or a place that looks like a fish camp (because it is a fish camp ). No sewers either. So every house has a huge "Indian mound" septic tank in front. Robyn
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Old 05-14-2014, 07:37 AM
 
9,226 posts, read 9,295,009 times
Reputation: 28930
If one resides in a single family home outside a condominium complex for most of one's life, one should think carefully before moving into a condominium complex. I recommend several things first:

1. Get a copy of the HOA rules and carefully go through them.

2. Talk to people in the complex and find out rigorously the rules are enforced and its probably a good idea to track someone down on the HOA board and talk to them too, to get a sense of how seriously they take rules like "All bushes must be cut 3" below window sills" or "No rose bushes are allowed".

3. Ask yourself how you will feel constantly having to abide by rules set by others.

My father moved to a condominium in his late fifties. Within two years, he sold out and moved back to a home outside a condo complex. He couldn't stand the rules and couldn't stand the people running the HOA.

My second home is part of a complex and the rules are starting to irritate me. I love the home, but not some of the narrow-mindedness of the people running it. Its been my observation in life that some of those who have the least power tend to get their jollies misusing it the most.

Last edited by markg91359; 05-14-2014 at 07:48 AM..
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Old 05-14-2014, 02:48 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,247,952 times
Reputation: 14870
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
If one resides in a single family home outside a condominium complex for most of one's life, one should think carefully before moving into a condominium complex. I recommend several things first:

1. Get a copy of the HOA rules and carefully go through them.

2. Talk to people in the complex and find out rigorously the rules are enforced and its probably a good idea to track someone down on the HOA board and talk to them too, to get a sense of how seriously they take rules like "All bushes must be cut 3" below window sills" or "No rose bushes are allowed".

3. Ask yourself how you will feel constantly having to abide by rules set by others.
4. Sharing walls with your neighbors.


Gives me the heebie-jeebies just thinking about it.
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Old 05-14-2014, 02:59 PM
 
9,226 posts, read 9,295,009 times
Reputation: 28930
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post
4. Sharing walls with your neighbors.


Gives me the heebie-jeebies just thinking about it.
Ours is freestanding and doesn't share any walls. Nevertheless, you are right. That idea makes me almost ill.
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