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Old 05-12-2014, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,985,208 times
Reputation: 15649

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Quote:
Originally Posted by eok View Post
Wouldn't you much rather live next door to the 10 inch grass than the all-night dog? And what if the grass is 8 inches tall, but has millions of dandelions? Shouldn't that be considered a worse violation than pure lawn grass growing to 10 inches?

Such ordinances would be better specifying types of weeds instead of grass. E.g. if your lawn has more than 1000 dandelions visible, or more than 100 vines of bindweed. The ordinance could list hundreds of types of weeds, and say how many of each would be considered a violation.
Absolutely.

And the millions of dandelions would not only be beautiful but a highly nutritious source of food (the leaves) assuming one doesn't dump chemlawn on them. But then, the manicured look is more important I suppose.
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Old 05-12-2014, 06:10 AM
 
29,784 posts, read 34,880,403 times
Reputation: 11710
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Absolutely.

And the millions of dandelions would not only be beautiful but a highly nutritious source of food (the leaves) assuming one doesn't dump chemlawn on them. But then, the manicured look is more important I suppose.
Yes for many it is and thus they select HOA communities to live in. For others not and they roll with the randomness of neighborhood appearance.
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Old 05-12-2014, 06:25 AM
 
Location: Columbia SC
8,984 posts, read 7,753,935 times
Reputation: 12191
I like HOA living because one reason I bought in was I liked the looks, amenities, etc. that were being offered and I want to keep it up to the same standard. Without HOA controls it can be a crap shoot as to what happens.

I can show you two near identical stand alone home HOA neighborhoods, built at the same time, and priced near the same. Some 10 years later one neighborhood looks lovely. Look as good or better then it did 10 years a go. The other has a very mixed look bordering on an overall crap look. The good looking HOA did exercise control. They were not overly zealous (I lived there, I know) but they did exercise control. The other HOA was very lax and allowed things to get out of control. They have been tightening up in the last two years but they have a long way to go.

Even with controls things can get out of hand. See what can happen with no controls.

http://www.joespc.com/carlos/redneck.htm
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Old 05-12-2014, 06:30 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,938,980 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
...One thing any homeowner should do is to find good and fair repair/maintenance people to do what is necessary especially when they cannot do such due to age or inability. I have such an HVAC company and an auto mechanic I trust. Also have a local tire and auto service place I trust. Most anything else can be done by a good handyman though finding such is a task in itself. The best sources I have found are personal recommendations from friends, family, etc. and never, never, never hire a family member..........LOL
That is indeed an excellent suggestion. We are still - for the most part - using the outfits that were subs when we built our house for maintenance/repairs/replacements. With some exceptions (the owner of the electrical firm died and we had to find a new firm). It's especially important to have a relationship with something like a plumbing firm (water leaks can cause major damage in no time). Also - we have a home handyman. He was the "super" on our house when we built it. And does many things around the house for us. Robyn
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Old 05-12-2014, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,938,980 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
...Not keeping up your yard--your spouse just died. You have just been diagnosed with a serious disease. Obviously you've got better things to do. You were in an accident--you are temporarily unable to care for your yard. These things happen.
That is obviously more the exception than the general rule for most people - unless you're "Calamity Jane/John". And the OP was talking about people in non-emergency situations.

Quote:
I agree 100% with this post. Most yards look great and most people take pride in their yards. The only time I have EVER seen a house with tall weeds growing up was a foreclosed house. It did look horrible and I think that town probably got after the bank or whoever was responsible and got it taken care of. But I don't need to see a lawn mown according to strict schedule, I don't mind at all if somebody's grass gets a little too tall. It's not my problem and they will get to it when they get the time. Maybe it rained on their day off and they couldn't mow it. I can understand that.
Like I've stated - all places are different. The recommended height for Augustine grass in Florida is about 3" to start with. It can grow more than an inch a week during the summer. No one here thinks twice about grass that's 5" inch tall - because it can get that high between regular weekly mowings - not to mention mowings that are delayed as a result of our (often frequent) summer rains.

Quote:
We don't need to spray pesticides around here and I'm glad of it because I don't want poisons sprayed on anything anywhere near where I live. There is organic lawn care or there are weeds and it's fine with me. I don't go over anybody's lawn with a magnifying glass looking for weeds. I also don't want to take my dog for a walk and have him lick or sniff somebody's poisoned lawn. We all pick up after our dogs and I've lived in rich towns and poor towns, mostly in the middle, and we have always had the philosophy of live and let live. Tolerance. Boy, I could never live in an HOA. We take care of our yard just fine without rules and so do most people I have ever seen everywhere I've lived. We are planting imported pendulous tuberous begonias in the window boxes--hahahahaha. So I could never live in an HOA where they dictate what you can plant! lol
Again - Augustine grass requires pesticides. We do have so-called "organic" lawn care - but it's very expensive and not particularly effective. As for picking up after your dogs - that's a whole 'nother issue IMO. I never understood why people think they have a right to deposit their dog's "poop" in my yard (and I don't care whether they try to pick it up - there's always some left that gets on your feet when you walk on the lawn). When I see people using my yard as a rest room for their dogs - I tell them to go elsewhere. Robyn
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Old 05-12-2014, 07:12 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,938,980 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
What kind of people would let the weeds grow knee high in the first place? I mean, this is not commonly, if ever, encountered. I almost feel like taking a video of all the neighborhoods around here just to show how nice the yards look with no HOA at all. There's no need for these rules.

When I lived in suburbia the d*** lawn mowers were going all weekend. Everybody put lime on their lawns in the fall and fertilized them in the spring. It's a non issue. You must have some weird people living there if they allow the weeds to grow knee high. I don't think the poster I quoted wants knee high weeds, nobody does, nobody I've ever known of anyway.
Like I mentioned a ways back - there are communities in my metro area (and I suspect lots of others) that are blighted and like you describe. Both urban areas and rural. Also - as a result of the financial crisis - many newer communities have been left unfinished/have had foreclosures/etc. and have houses in various states of disrepair. Indeed - the OP's message pretty much asked what - if anything - people should do to "help" if an older person allowed his/her property to fall into disrepair (for any number of reasons). So - the OP basically set forth a situation where a property *is* in a state of disrepair/neglect and the owner is elderly. People who live in perfect neighborhoods/areas obviously need not concern themselves with this situation except on a hypothetical basis .

Because we have so many lawn services here - it's usually pretty quiet on weekends (they don't work on Saturdays unless it's been a rainy week and they're not allowed to work on Sundays). We also have rules about when a homeowner can operate lawn equipment (different hours allowed on different days). I've never been awakened by the sound of lawn equipment - ever (then again - I don't sleep until noon ).

I'm not sure what "lime" has to do with the price of onions - but it's the last thing anyone would use on our very alkaline soils here. There is a treatment that's used here if the soil gets much too alkaline - but I've forgotten what it is. And what's wrong with fertilizer? Most things except for established shrubs and trees need it. Especially flowers - vegetables - and grass. And various fruit trees like citrus (which are very heavy feeders). TPTB in Florida have worked on fertilizer issues a lot - because fertilizer can pollute our waters. And there are extensive guidelines in terms of what to use - how much to use - how often to use it - and where to use it. I get newsletters from our local 4H/UF ag extension - that go through all these issues and similar. Any decent Florida landscape firm/responsible homeowner adheres to these guidelines. I guess because of our long/perpetual growing season here - we are perhaps more "landscaping obsessed" than homeowners in other parts of the country with shorter growing seasons. And also - what works/what people do in New England (or California or Arizona or Iowa) can be very different than what goes on here in Florida. Robyn
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Old 05-12-2014, 07:21 AM
 
29,784 posts, read 34,880,403 times
Reputation: 11710
One of the realities that often comes with transplanting are the changes in gardening seasons, soil conditions, lawn grass tolerance etc. Can be fun starting over and learning anew. However after now having learned and mastered NC gardening I have yielded and passed the torch to professionals.
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Old 05-12-2014, 07:45 AM
 
Location: The Carolinas
2,007 posts, read 2,020,158 times
Reputation: 6104
Send both the elderly lady and the single mother violation letters, and anyone else in violation. Show no favoritism to anyone, and treat them all equally. In those letters, send lists of handymen, mowers, etc. or suggest places they can look or call to find someone. It's not your job as codes enforcement to worry about how they do it. That said, you're compassionate and do care, which is good, but it's unfortunately not your job.
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Old 05-12-2014, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Dallas
5,601 posts, read 4,939,192 times
Reputation: 16459
Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post
Do you blame that on my grandma, who swept her front yard with a broom ca 1958? Seriously? How far do you want to go with that?
No one is blaming your grandmother. Just enlightening those of us who might not be aware that sweeping your yard free of dandelions is injurious to honeybees. Lighten up.
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Old 05-12-2014, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Florida
19,823 posts, read 19,916,125 times
Reputation: 23232
There's one 'small' problem with leaving dandelions alone.
In a few years all you will have is a yard consisting of dandelions.
If one doesn't think bees can find a substitute food for them, you can always plant clover.It mows pretty well and when in bloom attracts enough bees you don't want to walk barefoot.
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