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Old 05-21-2014, 01:19 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,760 posts, read 7,041,256 times
Reputation: 14300

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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Interesting how few folks use their property in ways other than to grow food, thinking others are judging them by their pristine lawns. Cannot imagine having an acre of nothing but manicured grass, and not a dandelion to be found. The other day my 15-mo-old grandtwins were running around the yard picking the bright yellow dandelions, so pretty in meadows and yards, and I ran around after them telling them to stop.
I guess it was just a part of the times back then- this would have been in the 50's and 60's, and it was in western PA. My Dad's sworn enemies were dandelions, crabgrass, and Japanese beetles ( they did a number on his pride and joy roses). I often laugh at how he'd likely react to our lawn- he'd be horrified. We've lived in Florida for many years, and I've always figured that keeping any semblence of a lawn in this neck of the woods is basically beating back the jungle, and you've won if you're able to keep it somewhat at bay. We define a lawn in our house as anything that looks green and cuts, and we figure the weeds cut as well as the grass we put there.

What's really funny to me is that the St. Augustine varieties of grass are what do relatively well in Florida- this is the crabgrass my Dad fought so hard against for his lawn, and it's what we grow for grass at least in parts of Florida, because it spreads, and will cover bald spots that come up. Although the type of grass they seem to sod with around this neck of the woods is Bahia grass, which reportedly has the advantage of being drought resistant and roots deeply, so it's good for prevention of erosion. Well, my Dad would freak out at the appearance of our lawn, but then it's a whole 'nuther environment, the concept of being good stewards of our environmental assets comes into play, and I guess we just don't worry so much about our lawn being perfect-we'd go crazy if we did. I'm not sure my Dad kept his lawn up for the edification of the neighbors, either- he sure didn't win any popularity from them when he spread the Milorganite fertilizer over the lawn every spring.

As for cultivated flowers and plants, I'm the original brown thumb, better at killing any poor innocent green thing than anyone I know. So what's outside has to be native, because that way we don't worry about the weather being too hot, too cold, too wet, too salty for the plants to survive, and figure that G-d takes care of those.
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Old 05-21-2014, 01:27 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,760 posts, read 7,041,256 times
Reputation: 14300
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
Egad and I thought my neighbors were bad. Seriously, I know that folks with pristine lawns hear about it and get complements from neighbors and folks just walking by. Not sure those with ummmm lets say not pristine lawns really know what folks think about theirs. lots of folks like corner lots so they can showcase their lawns.
Let me just put it this way. We don't care what others think of our less than pristine lawn. The reality is that we're in an area (SW Florida) where it's hard to grow a perfect lawn- the soil is sandy, near the coast it's also somewhat briny, and grass competes with many types of "natives" for the space and nutrients. We also have water restrictions, and if you're on waterfront property ( which we are), there are restrictions for fertilizing as well. There aren't too many lawns around here I'd call pristine, but I don't see too many people obsessing over the appearance of their lawns, either.
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Old 05-22-2014, 09:56 AM
 
1,770 posts, read 2,443,971 times
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Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
There's that victim mentality peaking out again....

I do think the single mother status IS the result of choices made- at least in part by the woman....

Agree ! Any woman who doesn't have a well established career and the means to go single as a mother, shouldn't even think about having children. The father cannot be a guarantee: accidents occur, divorce, you name it. Be prepared to go it alone. And I for one, do NOT have any social, moral or financial obligation to help a single mother support her children.
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Old 05-22-2014, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,744,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
I guess it was just a part of the times back then- this would have been in the 50's and 60's, and it was in western PA. My Dad's sworn enemies were dandelions, crabgrass, and Japanese beetles.......
Speaking of crabgrass, I've noticed over the years that certain posters represent the metaphorical crabgrass on the lawn of life.

Normally I would say I'm digressing, but this thread has had the wildest off-topic swings I've ever seen, so in the context I'm just following the trend here.
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Old 05-23-2014, 05:13 AM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,876,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
Let me just put it this way. We don't care what others think of our less than pristine lawn. The reality is that we're in an area (SW Florida) where it's hard to grow a perfect lawn- the soil is sandy, near the coast it's also somewhat briny, and grass competes with many types of "natives" for the space and nutrients. We also have water restrictions, and if you're on waterfront property ( which we are), there are restrictions for fertilizing as well. There aren't too many lawns around here I'd call pristine, but I don't see too many people obsessing over the appearance of their lawns, either.
Depends on the area and neighborhood. People often buy where they feel most comfortable with the look they want. That's why realtors talk about curbside appeal. Your soil conditions drive much also. One of the reasons SOME find HOA's so desirable is that they help drive what your neighbors think. Others want the opposite. Which brings us back to Teddy's original OP question. What happens when anyone in a HOA community is no longer able or unable to comply with the covenants/guidelines? Should there be exceptions based on age?

Last edited by TuborgP; 05-23-2014 at 05:24 AM..
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Old 05-23-2014, 05:25 AM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,876,173 times
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This thread I thought was in the context of HOA communities and compliance issues. My and I suspect others comments were in that context.
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Old 05-23-2014, 01:49 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,760 posts, read 7,041,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
Depends on the area and neighborhood. People often buy where they feel most comfortable with the look they want. That's why realtors talk about curbside appeal. Your soil conditions drive much also. One of the reasons SOME find HOA's so desirable is that they help drive what your neighbors think. Others want the opposite. Which brings us back to Teddy's original OP question. What happens when anyone in a HOA community is no longer able or unable to comply with the covenants/guidelines? Should there be exceptions based on age?
Back to the original premise of the thread, IMO, exceptions should not be made based on age. Doesn't mean that the old folks (or anyone else, for that matter) who look to be having a hard time keeping up with their property shouldn't be checked on, reasons determined why that's happening, and helped one way or another to get things fixed up- whether it's their own kids, neighbors, or someone else, who gets things rolling in that regard. I don't think that properties should just be let go because someone who moved in there, knowing full well what the HOA requirements were, says they can't do it anymore.

That said, while I have a sense of pride in maintaining this piece of paradise that we own, and ensure that it's well taken care of, I have no desire to have an HOA looking over my shoulder and dictating to me how it's maintained, what we have on the property, or what color our house is. I might know my roof needs cleaning ( it doesn't), and if that's the case I'll get to it, but I don't want a nasty-gram from the HOA president informing me of a deadline to get that done, with the consequences of a hefty fine if I miss that deadline. Or the same nasty-gram because we have too many weeds in the yard.

So we've always avoided gated communities, properties governed by HOAs- and will fight tooth and nail against the guy in our community ( a recent transplant from NY) who wants to turn our loosely associated community of homeowners into the regulated HOA he's apparently used to.

There, we've come full circle in this thread.
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Old 05-23-2014, 04:41 PM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,876,173 times
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HOA's after the fact should be another story if the transplant wanted one he should gotten in one when he purchased ,
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Old 05-23-2014, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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I'd have to look it up - but I don't think you can do a HOA "after the fact" in Florida unless all homeowners agree. Robyn
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Old 05-23-2014, 06:20 PM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,876,173 times
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Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
I'd have to look it up - but I don't think you can do a HOA "after the fact" in Florida unless all homeowners agree. Robyn
That is my understanding. Just like wanting to dissolve one
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