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Old 05-26-2014, 04:42 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,843,254 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Extremely rare even in Syracuse. I honestly wouldn't think about snow in May around here. You may find this to be interesting as well: Military.com | Best Places for Military Retirement - #10 Syracuse, NY

CNYcentral.com - Latest local news, weather and sports for Syracuse and Central New York

No you are right. It is rare. If I want to live in snow country I might as well live here. MA is one of the better medical areas (VA or civilian) around. I already have resources here as well. There is already a core of friends my wife has here (Korean). So a move north would only exacerbate an already dislike for more cold even if only a few miles. Your cold weather up off the Great Lakes is even worse then my milder winters. Your snow light as it is still piles up and I do not want to deal with it.
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Old 05-26-2014, 04:59 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,537 posts, read 39,914,033 times
Reputation: 23643
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
We retired to the Raleigh/Durham area. Love it. Summers are hot and humid. But not unbearable. ... Just stay inside under A/C in the afternoon.
...
thx 4 the VA reference,

I have never had (or needed) a home, or a car with AC, but I have visited a few places that I was real glad someone can afford to have AC! (and $10 rental cars).

Total energy cost in retirement (and before retirement) is one reason I prefer to live in places with no need for AC. I like sleeping @ 50F with my windows open and the breeze blowing through, and owls hooting.

I get by with under $80 / month for total utilities yr round (water / elect / trash / ..., no gas in countryside). (excluding cell phone and pay-by-the-byte internet.)
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Old 05-26-2014, 06:01 AM
 
56,529 posts, read 80,824,285 times
Reputation: 12482
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
No you are right. It is rare. If I want to live in snow country I might as well live here. MA is one of the better medical areas (VA or civilian) around. I already have resources here as well. There is already a core of friends my wife has here (Korean). So a move north would only exacerbate an already dislike for more cold even if only a few miles. Your cold weather up off the Great Lakes is even worse then my milder winters. Your snow light as it is still piles up and I do not want to deal with it.
It is actually a move west down I-90, but I understand.
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Old 05-26-2014, 07:31 AM
 
38,104 posts, read 14,885,535 times
Reputation: 24537
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
thx 4 the VA reference,

I have never had (or needed) a home, or a car with AC, but I have visited a few places that I was real glad someone can afford to have AC! (and $10 rental cars).

Total energy cost in retirement (and before retirement) is one reason I prefer to live in places with no need for AC. I like sleeping @ 50F with my windows open and the breeze blowing through, and owls hooting.

I get by with under $80 / month for total utilities yr round (water / elect / trash / ..., no gas in countryside). (excluding cell phone and pay-by-the-byte internet.)
I love to sleep with the window open at night as well and I don't care at all for being shut inside during July and Aug. I believe western NC in the Blue Ridge mountain area is pleasant during the summers with very mild winters. I think there is a VA facility in Asheville.

We decided on this area mainly because of the mild winters and RDU airport nearby. Our kids and friends are flung all over creation and this makes it easier to see them.

In addition to the hot and humid summers, it is growing community so lots of traffic. But also lots of great restaurants and things to do.

I've heard that up along the central mountain area in Costa Rica there is no need for heat or A/C. You put on a sweater or open the windows, depending.

Tempting.
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Old 05-26-2014, 07:48 AM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
8,774 posts, read 14,859,160 times
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As a 70 Yo retiree from the NY metropolitan area I can not imagine any good reason to ever have to drive or walk in snow ever again.

I do however like to return to my home state (of course in warm weather) so a one day drive is all that I need to reach some decent year round weather.

The southern part in NC in the Sandhiils suits us just fine.

10 hrs drive to NJ for summer visits and 10 hrs drive to Fl if it gets too chilly in Jan.

Is it hot in the summer? That's why they make A/C.

BTW COL a lot less than the Northeast.
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Old 05-26-2014, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PDD View Post
As a 70 Yo retiree from the NY metropolitan area I can not imagine any good reason to ever have to drive or walk in snow ever again.
Oh, I can imagine a good reason - for the pure joy and fun of it! I have very fond memories of riding dirt motorcycles in the snow, a slippin' an a slidin', getting ahead to ambush the oncoming friends with snowballs. Walking in the snow? A great pleasure!

I love life here in Los Angeles, but it is not perfect, as there is no such thing as an earthly paradise. An earthly paradise would include some snow; I really miss the snow, and I am 70 too.
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Old 05-26-2014, 10:37 AM
 
56,529 posts, read 80,824,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PDD View Post
As a 70 Yo retiree from the NY metropolitan area I can not imagine any good reason to ever have to drive or walk in snow ever again.

I do however like to return to my home state (of course in warm weather) so a one day drive is all that I need to reach some decent year round weather.

The southern part in NC in the Sandhiils suits us just fine.

10 hrs drive to NJ for summer visits and 10 hrs drive to Fl if it gets too chilly in Jan.

Is it hot in the summer? That's why they make A/C.

BTW COL a lot less than the Northeast.
It depends on what part if the Northeast, as the list shows that many Interior Northeastern areas are on par with many Southern metros.
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Old 05-26-2014, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Asheville NC
1,602 posts, read 1,312,212 times
Reputation: 4155
Default These NC tax rates are no longer correct

Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
NORTH CAROLINA

Sales Taxes

State Sales Tax:4.750% Prescription drugs, medical equipment exempt, food subject to 2% county tax. Counties may add an additional 2% to 3% tax.
Gasoline Tax: 56.2 cents/gallon (Includes all taxes)
Diesel Fuel Tax: 62.2 cents/gallon (Includes all taxes)
Cigarette Tax: 45 cents/pack of 20
Personal Income Taxes

Tax Rate Range: Low – 6.0%; High – 7.75%
Income Brackets: * Lowest – $12,750; Highest – $60,000
Number of Brackets: 3 The tax brackets reported are for single individuals. for married taxpayers the same rates apply to income brackets ranging from $21,250 to $100,000. Lower exemption amounts allowed for high-income taxpayers. For tax year 2012 the starting point for calculating a taxpayers taxable income is the taxpayer’s federal adjusted gross income (AGI). The previous starting point was the taxpayer’s federal; taxable income.
Personal Exemptions: ** Single – $1,200; Married – $2,500; Dependents – $0 Click here for more information.
Standard Deduction: Single – $3,000; Married filing jointly – $6,000. If you or your spouse are 65 or older you may claim an additional deduction (See state tax instruction booklet)
Medical/Dental Deduction: Federal amount. Income tax credit for premiums paid on long-term care insurance that covers the individual, a spouse or dependent. Credit is equal to 15% of premium cost but may not exceed $350.
Federal Income Tax Deduction: None
Retirement Income Taxes: Social Security is exempt. At least $4,000 in exclusions for federal, state and local pensions (depending on dates and length of service); up to $2,000 exemption for qualified private pensions, including IRAs. Out-of-state government pensions also qualify for the $4,000 exemption. State retirees with at least 5 years of creditable service as of August 12, 1989, will be permanently exempt from state income tax on their retired/retainer pay. Be sure to investigate the Bailey decision. Taxable income also includes income derived from gaming in North Carolina. For more details on retirement income deductions, click here and on the tax form page 13 – click here.
Retired Military Pay: If an individual had five years of creditable service as of August 12, 1989, all military retired pay is exempt from taxes. Otherwise, a deduction of up to $4,000 is allowed for military pay or survivor’s benefits.
Military Disability Retired Pay: Retirees who entered the military before Sept. 24, 1975, and members receiving disability retirements based on combat injuries or who could receive disability payments from the VA are covered by laws giving disability broad exemption from federal income tax. Most military retired pay based on service-related disabilities also is free from federal income tax, but there is no guarantee of total protection.
VA Disability Dependency and Indemnity Compensation: VA benefits are not taxable because they generally are for disabilities and are not subject to federal or state taxes.
Military SBP/SSBP/RCSBP/RSFPP: Generally subject to state taxes for those states with income tax. Check with state department of revenue office.
Property Taxes

All property, real and personal, is subject to taxation and is assessed based on 100% of appraised value. Taxes are collected by cities and counties. Click here for tax rates.
There is an elderly or disabled exclusion which excludes the greater of the first $25,000 or 50% of the appraised value of the permanent residence of the qualifying owner. A qualifying owner must be at least 65 years old or be totally and permanently disabled. The owner cannot have an income amount from the previous year that exceeds the income eligibility limit for the urgent year which is $27,100 for 2012.
The state also has a circuit breaker property tax deferment program. Under this program, taxes for each year are limited to a percentage of the qualifying owner’s income. The qualifying owner must either be at least 65 years of age or be totally and permanently disabled. For an owner whose income amount for the previous years does not exceed the income eligibility limit for the current year, which for tax year 2012 is $27,100, the owner’s taxes will be limited to 4% of the owner’s income. For an owner whose income exceeds the income eligibility limit, which for tax year 2010 is $40,650, the owner’s taxes will be limited to 5% of the owner’s income.
Inheritance and Estate Taxes

On June 27, 2011, a bill was signed into law by North Carolina governor Beverly Perdue. This law clarifies that the North Carolina estate tax does not apply to the estates of decedents who died in 2010 but will apply to the estates of decedents dying on or after January 1, 2011 with a $5,000,000 exemption, which is indexed for inflation in 2012 so that the 2012 exemption is $5,120,000.
For further information, visit the North Carolina Department of Revenue site.
* The tax brackets reported are for single individuals. For married taxpayers, the same rates apply to income brackets ranging from $21,250 to $200,000. An additional middle income tax credit is allowed.
** Taxpayers who claim standard deduction or itemize deductions on federal return must make adjustments.

The rates changed last year

here is an explanation

Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough, LLP - Attorneys at Law
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Old 05-26-2014, 02:11 PM
 
29,764 posts, read 34,851,819 times
Reputation: 11675
Quote:
Originally Posted by funisart View Post
The rates changed last year

here is an explanation

Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough, LLP - Attorneys at Law
Yup
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Old 05-26-2014, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,920,408 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
thx 4 the VA reference,

I have never had (or needed) a home, or a car with AC, but I have visited a few places that I was real glad someone can afford to have AC! (and $10 rental cars).

Total energy cost in retirement (and before retirement) is one reason I prefer to live in places with no need for AC. I like sleeping @ 50F with my windows open and the breeze blowing through, and owls hooting.

I get by with under $80 / month for total utilities yr round (water / elect / trash / ..., no gas in countryside). (excluding cell phone and pay-by-the-byte internet.)
It's easy to save on utilities if you're ok with a house that's cold in the winter and/or hot in the summer. My max in the summer is 76 - my minimum in the winter is 71. Note that we have owls - but can easily hear them with closed windows . Different strokes for different folks. Robyn
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