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Old 05-26-2014, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
It's easy to save on utilities if you're ok with a house that's cold in the winter and/or hot in the summer. My max in the summer is 76 - my minimum in the winter is 71. Note that we have owls - but can easily hear them with closed windows . Different strokes for different folks. Robyn
I would imagine your utility bills are pretty steep. My max in the summer is 83 - my minimum in the winter is 62. I dislike an extreme contrast when I go outside, or conversely, when I come inside.
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Old 05-26-2014, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,932,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
...You may also like the Finger Lakes, Lake Ontario and the 1000 Islands as well for getaways all within an hour and a half or so.
I went to school in the Finger Lakes - and that is one reason I wound up in Florida .

But I realize all people are different - especially in terms of temperature tolerances. FWIW - when I did live in the Finger Lakes - we had extremely cold winters with tons of snow. Then the weather seemed to moderate a bit for a while a few decades after I left. This winter - it was apparently cold and snowy again. I think these weather things tend to go in cycles. But mostly regress to the mean after extremes. Robyn
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Old 05-26-2014, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I would imagine your utility bills are pretty steep. My max in the summer is 83 - my minimum in the winter is 62. I dislike an extreme contrast when I go outside, or conversely, when I come inside.
Steep indeed - I guess. About $4k/year for electric (an all electric house with about 3k SF under HVAC).

You say you don't like extreme contrasts between inside and outside - but what about "inside and inside"? Twenty degrees between the high and low inside seems like a lot to me. Especially because I don't wear the same clothing inside and outside (especially in the winter). When it's 71 inside here in the winter - I'm sleeping with a medium weight long sleeve flannel nightie under a medium weight quilt. When it's 76 here inside - I'm sleeping with a light weight nightie under a light weight quilt.

I think I'd be freezing at 62 inside - boiling at 83. Like I've been cooking a lot this holiday weekend. How on earth could I cook if it were 83 inside!!!

FWIW - as a matter of curiosity only - my BP goes up a lot when I'm cold (which is apparently not all that unusual). Robyn
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Old 05-26-2014, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,740,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Steep indeed - I guess. About $4k/year for electric (an all electric house with about 3k SF under HVAC).

You say you don't like extreme contrasts between inside and outside - but what about "inside and inside"? Twenty degrees between the high and low inside seems like a lot to me. Especially because I don't wear the same clothing inside and outside (especially in the winter). When it's 71 inside here in the winter - I'm sleeping with a medium weight long sleeve flannel nightie under a medium weight quilt. When it's 76 here inside - I'm sleeping with a light weight nightie under a light weight quilt.

I think I'd be freezing at 62 inside - boiling at 83. Like I've been cooking a lot this holiday weekend. How on earth could I cook if it were 83 inside!!!
There is really no contrast between "inside and inside" because the temperature differences occur at different times of year. As the weather gets warmer in the spring, our bodies adapt to the warmer temperatures, and the reverse takes place as the weather gets cooler in the fall. So if my house was 62 degrees inside on a March day and then 83 degrees inside on a freak day in May because of an unusually early heat wave reaching 100 for a couple of days, there is no discernible contrast because those two events are two months apart.

As far as how you could cook when it's 83 inside, I would say how could you not be able to cook when it's 83 inside? If it's 83 inside (at least here) that means it's 95 or 100 outside. By contrast, the 83 is comfortably cool. I take it you don't spend much time out of doors. I would feel like I'm in prison to be house-bound.

Of course in the winter I increase the blankets and/or layers for sleeping. What could be more normal?

As for your utility costs, $4,000 per year divided by twelve is only $333 per month, much cheaper than I would have imagined given the extremism of your thermostat settings. My electric plus natural gas averages about $35 a month over a year's time for a smaller place and only one person.
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Old 05-26-2014, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,978,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post

I think I'd be freezing at 62 inside - boiling at 83. Like I've been cooking a lot this holiday weekend. How on earth could I cook if it were 83 inside!!!
62 degrees inside or out is ideal temp range in New England, even if it's humid. Cool humid air is nice, especially on the ocean.
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Old 05-26-2014, 06:51 PM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,871,258 times
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AC-72/73
Heat-68/73
It's the wife who wants it warmer in Winter and Summer. I want it cooler
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Old 05-27-2014, 06:46 AM
 
56,637 posts, read 80,930,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by funisart View Post
The rates changed last year

here is an explanation

Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough, LLP - Attorneys at Law
There seems to be some pros and cons to this change. I think it looks good for working folks, especially those that are wealthy, but it does look like retirees are subject to income tax and lose an exemption. Correct me if I'm wrong.
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Old 05-27-2014, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Glenbogle
730 posts, read 1,027,552 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
AC-72/73
Heat-68/73
That's pretty much my preferred settings too. Actually I'd be perfectly happy with 72 degrees in my house year round, LOL.

Talking about temperature differentials, in my last house which was a colonial, there was at least a 5-degree difference in temperature between the first and second floors in summer if I didn't use the AC on the upper floor (which, due to financial constraints, I often had to avoid doing). There was no AC on the ground floor because it really wasn't needed. When the temps were in the high 80s outside, it was common for the ground floor to be about 72 degrees but the second floor (if AC not used) 80 degrees or higher, especially if it was a sunny rather than overcast day.
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Old 05-27-2014, 08:20 AM
 
14,260 posts, read 23,995,588 times
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We heat to 65 during the day, 60 at night.
We generally don't cool BUT when we do, 82 is generally the setting.
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Old 05-27-2014, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Asheville NC
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Default Yes

Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
There seems to be some pros and cons to this change. I think it looks good for working folks, especially those that are wealthy, but it does look like retirees are subject to income tax and lose an exemption. Correct me if I'm wrong.
You are right to a point. It depends on your "retirement income", amount and source. The standard deduction has been raised. For us the cost of living and all taxes, are so much less in NC, the changes in the tax rates are not a concern.
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