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Old 05-18-2014, 12:53 PM
 
676 posts, read 747,569 times
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Has anyone created a will online ? Is it legal and above board ? I don't have the money to have a will done by an attorney. Input appreciated..P.S. It would be a super simple will...
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Old 05-18-2014, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Oregon
1,379 posts, read 2,678,579 times
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I have used Quicken Willmaker Plus software, by NOLO. You buy the software, but it's not expensive. And, yes, the wills are legal. You need to have your signature witnessed. That doesn't mean they can't be contested.
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Old 05-18-2014, 01:41 PM
 
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We had our will and power of various power's of attorney done by attorney for $250 to me minimal cost,this after heart attack and open heart which opened my eyes wide.
Wife was helpless in this situation,
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Old 05-18-2014, 03:13 PM
 
Location: middle tennessee
1,927 posts, read 996,754 times
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Holographic (handwritten) wills are recognized in my state. I also made bank accounts, etc 'Payable on Death" to the person who has agreed to look after things when I'm gone. My children appear to be satisfied with my arrangements.

Make sure that your will is as "simple" as you believe it to be. Do some research about what is required in your state and you may not have to spend anything.

I am single and rent.
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Old 05-18-2014, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Oregon
1,379 posts, read 2,678,579 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boogie'smom View Post
Holographic (handwritten) wills are recognized in my state. I also made bank accounts, etc 'Payable on Death" to the person who has agreed to look after things when I'm gone. My children appear to be satisfied with my arrangements.

Make sure that your will is as "simple" as you believe it to be. Do some research about what is required in your state and you may not have to spend anything.

I am single and rent.
And, in Oregon, you can do the same with a house. TODD....transfer of deed on death. That's what we're doing, as well as our bank accounts. It all stays out of probate.
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Old 05-19-2014, 03:32 AM
 
71,979 posts, read 72,020,102 times
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having gotten burned not once in my lifetime but 2x with poorly constructed wills i would never use a canned will off line ever.

missing verbage is common as well as no details on the protocols of that state are ever given for executing that will.

you run a big risk that can cause huge expenses for heirs by navagating this minefield on your own.

just a word to the wise. there are no do overs for heirs when things go wrong or are challenged.

it takes a lot of experience in that state to cover all the bases and most on line wills miss way to much verbage.

in fact when we executed our wills there were very specific questions asked in front of witnesses that while not law are protocals that come in to play when and if the wills are challenged. very important to do in 2nd marriages when other kids are involved.,
.

what verbage can go wrong ? how about our refinance on an inerited house when the title company read the will and stopped the closing.

the will read ,to my child **** i leave my house and possesions.


what could be more simple than that?

well it was missing a word . the word "ONLY " as in ONLY CHILD.

i had to pay 3 attorneys that day and lost my interest rate and had to get affidivates stating she was an only child from relatives.


we had another will with missing verbage get challenged by the probate court about what happens if the kids predecease the parents, which is what did happen in this case..


when reading these canned documents all looks fine but when courts look under the hood things can turn ugly very quickly.

we went last month to a well known estate and elder law attorney and re-did all our paper work which was now outdated or just plain wrong that a general practioner did for us 12 years ago.

many things and practices in wills has changed and things like powers of attorney that require you to be deemed incapacitated by a professional are no longer used in many states.

we ended up doing new powers of attorney , healthcare proxies , living wills and 2 disclaimer trusts. it cost us 5k but well worth it as the state estate tax savings can be pretty huge.


trying to save a few bucks here can cost your heirs big time if things are not done to what courts or title companies like in that state whether law or just protocol.
.

.

Last edited by mathjak107; 05-19-2014 at 04:15 AM..
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Old 05-19-2014, 09:03 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,780 posts, read 7,069,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kadylady View Post
And, in Oregon, you can do the same with a house. TODD....transfer of deed on death. That's what we're doing, as well as our bank accounts. It all stays out of probate.
That sounds like what they call here a "Ladybird Quitclaim Deed". It's not legal in all states, but it is in Florida, and from what you say, some other states as well.
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Old 05-19-2014, 10:45 AM
 
Location: USA
1,815 posts, read 2,247,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kadylady View Post
I have used Quicken Willmaker Plus software, by NOLO. You buy the software, but it's not expensive. And, yes, the wills are legal. You need to have your signature witnessed. That doesn't mean they can't be contested.

Please be sure and check the statutes in your state. Some states require as many as three witness signatures AND a notary public before the Will is valid.

If your estate is sizeable, you really should consult an attorney. There are taxes and probate costs to consider and only an attorney can understand and advise you correctly on that.
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Old 05-19-2014, 10:49 AM
 
48,516 posts, read 84,066,874 times
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It depends the will and now complicated really.
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Old 05-19-2014, 12:52 PM
 
741 posts, read 643,073 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red On The Noodle View Post
If your estate is sizeable, you really should consult an attorney.
Good advice.
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