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Old 12-14-2007, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,712 posts, read 33,745,076 times
Reputation: 51977

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rferd View Post
I will be retiring in about 8 months and although I am not really afraid, I am a bit concerned. Although when I should be OK with SS and a pension plan that should provide - between the two - for a confortable, although not a rich income, I am concern about the psicological effect of the abrupt change in life style.

I have put 35 years of productive and satisfying work in a firm where I have grown professionally and emotionally; where I am appreciated and rewarded. But... I have to leave the future to the young and "phase out". The life style that I have experienced thus far, and that I have enjoyed, will be changed in a few month and I am concerned if I will be able to handle it.

Has anyone had this experience? How did you handle it?

Thanks.
Figure out what it is that you like about your job and put yourself in a position where you can apply it to retirement. For example:

If you like the planning part of your job, volunteer for town planning activities (like planning the parade, the annual fair, the art show, etc.) or church, club or charitable organization activity planning. Get on some committee that plans an annual town or charity event. Try to own a piece of the planning (i.e., you are in charge of planning the concert) of the larger event (like an annual festival).

If you like competition at work, join a club, organization or team where you have an opportunity to be competitive (art show, photography show, garden club, fishing tournament, home decorations, bowling team, golf group, etc.) with others or where you can judge competitions.

If you like dealing with customers on the job, volunteer for one-time/annual town events for variety of activities, and with a beginning and an end, for meeting an assortment of people. Make sure your volunteer piece is not behind the scenes so you can meet more people the day of the event. That's where the variety of contacts will be.

If you like socializing with co-workers, join a club that also has a social component in addition to the main function of the club (i.e., a book club that goes out to lunch after the discussion, an ATV club that has picnics, dinners, dances, etc. for it's members, etc.). Consider church or charitable organization for this one, too.

If you like a travel aspect of your job, join a travel group.

If you like teaching classes at work or speaking in front of an audience, figure out what you know well enough to teach/lecture on in retirement and find a town that has a good retiree school and offer to teach a class. For example, if you are good at cooking, offer to teach a class on preparing meals for 10 or more people or cooking with garlic. If you like gardening, teach a class on planting roses or give a lecture with slideshow on fall flowers of the XYZ region. If you like travel, offer to teach a class on customs of some country you have been to. If you were in the military or like history, maybe you could teach a class on a particular battle or leader. If you are a retired doctor, maybe you could give a lecture on statin drugs or a re-emerging disease or treating AIDS in Uganda. If you were an accountant maybe you could give a lecture on the Ten Most Common Mistakes People Make on Their Tax Returns. Make the class specific enough so that if you enjoy it and your students enjoy it, you can lecture or teach subsequent classes on another aspect of your area of expertise/hobby/sport/profession. You'll probably do the same prep, you did for a work presentation and you'll probably have to assess your audience's needs just as you did for work. (P.S. My good lecturers in my retirement classes all come with PowerPoints, no matter what the topic, so that didn't change from work.)

If you like taking classes, find a town where you can take classes with the quality, number and variety you seek.

If you liked bossing people, find a club, organization or event that could use your people handling skills.

If you are a retired carpenter or painter, the town could probably use your skills for the annual fair/festival/show/charitable event.

If you are a professional, keep up your expertise by belonging to professional organizations. If possible, find out where people in your field retire so you can meet them and keep up with the latest news in your field. (Example: My town has a lot of retired scientists/engineers and they belong to local organizations. There are retiree classes and trips that you won't see anywhere else that would appeal to them, in my town. The local newspaper does a lot of science news stories. There are guest speakers in their field that come to town or are from the town where the public is invited to attend, the annual festival has a science component, we have a science museum.)

It's up to you to figure out what it is about your job that you like and look for opportunities to apply those things you like about your job, to your retirement. I've posted something like this before and apologize if it seems redundant but it's good to see people thinking about how to transition to retirement from the work they enjoyed.
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Old 12-14-2007, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Ocean Shores, WA
5,081 posts, read 12,989,229 times
Reputation: 10650
Retirement was the last excuse I ever had to come up with for avoiding work.
The best part of it was that nobody even questioned it.
Being retired is the easiest and most legitimate job I ever had.
I just wish it paid better.
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Old 12-15-2007, 10:27 AM
 
4,834 posts, read 5,552,144 times
Reputation: 2394
Thumbs up Good posts to this question!

Quote:
Originally Posted by rferd View Post
I will be retiring in about 8 months and although I am not really afraid, I am a bit concerned. Although when I should be OK with SS and a pension plan that should provide - between the two - for a confortable, although not a rich income, I am concern about the psicological effect of the abrupt change in life style.

I have put 35 years of productive and satisfying work in a firm where I have grown professionally and emotionally; where I am appreciated and rewarded. But... I have to leave the future to the young and "phase out". The life style that I have experienced thus far, and that I have enjoyed, will be changed in a few month and I am concerned if I will be able to handle it.

Has anyone had this experience? How did you handle it?

Thanks.
I see where you have received a number of good posts so I won't bore you with repetition. I am a retired professional engineer and my wife is a retired geriatric nurse. We both had demanding careers (along with raising 7 children) and neither of us were fearful of what retirement would do for us.

I remain semi retired as i like the challenge of a small, community project where my years of experience can help and she is loving the time without children, work problems and the rat race.

My wife spends lots of time pursuing her many hobbies and I spend lots of time in the yard developing it into a pleasurable place. We are also both into mentoring....after all...there are young uns out there who need help so why not give from life's experience?

Ah, and did I fail to mention that we went from city living to a small acreage in farm country?

My two cents

Last edited by RuralCoastalGuy; 12-15-2007 at 10:29 AM.. Reason: forgot something
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Old 12-15-2007, 01:50 PM
 
3,756 posts, read 9,619,027 times
Reputation: 7063
Start investigating interesting things to do with your time. I found a nearby senior citizens center with classes, elderhostel for travel, a volunteer position with a local charity, and loads of other things to do around the house. I want to get into scroll saw work and other hobbies. Will have lots to do to fill the time and some will keep me involved with other human beings which is very important.

www.folkschool.org has great classes for a huge variety of hobbies. Great way to get started.

Start a little ebay business on the side. Needs loads of time to research, buy and sell.

Take classes on any topic you fancy.
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Old 12-15-2007, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
55 posts, read 193,117 times
Reputation: 53
Good luck rfered!

You have a great attitude towards the issue, and you are thinking about it. That puts you ahead of 90% of the population, if not more!

Speaking of my own experience, i am so busy volunteering at my church and library that i barely have time for my new website - or the start up bank i am involved in. i honestly don't know what i would do with myself if i didnt have those things to do - you can't play golf everyday (at least in CT), and the guys i know who try to don't really have much to say except - "how about that putt i made on 17 today"!

Grab the ring, your best days could be ahead of you.
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Old 12-16-2007, 04:35 PM
 
240 posts, read 353,378 times
Reputation: 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tesaje View Post
For what it is worth, among the people I know who have retired and had a hard time with it, these are the characteristics they had:
No hobbies and real interests outside of work
Self-worth based almost solely on ranking at work (and usually not very realistic)
Strong need for outside-of-themselves structure in their life
They usually ended up coming back to work.

The many more people I know who are very happy in retirement have these characteristics:
Lots of varied interests and hobbies in life
Self-worth based on other than work things
Self-starters who don't need a structured life to keep busy (i.e., structure from outside sources)
Independent mind set
Good at entertaining themselves

Naturally, my acquaintances are a self-selected sample, but I do know a bunch of people who retired from my work place that aren't necessarily my friends.
good points.
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Old 12-16-2007, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mtns of NC
5,661 posts, read 24,694,672 times
Reputation: 3808
Quote:
Originally Posted by rferd View Post
I will be retiring in about 8 months and although I am not really afraid, I am a bit concerned. Although when I should be OK with SS and a pension plan that should provide - between the two - for a confortable, although not a rich income, I am concern about the psicological effect of the abrupt change in life style.

I have put 35 years of productive and satisfying work in a firm where I have grown professionally and emotionally; where I am appreciated and rewarded. But... I have to leave the future to the young and "phase out". The life style that I have experienced thus far, and that I have enjoyed, will be changed in a few month and I am concerned if I will be able to handle it.

Has anyone had this experience? How did you handle it?

Thanks.
Retirement was somewhat unsettling at first, but I got over it after a few months. Now I wonder how I ever survived working for 30 years.
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