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Old 05-25-2014, 02:06 PM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
8,774 posts, read 14,891,494 times
Reputation: 11886

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I sent a high end watch out of state to be repaired by a jeweler that I had previously done business with. He said it would take about six weeks to get my watch returned and I sent him the money when he called and said the watch was fixed.

After a couple of weeks I got an E-mail from the USPS saying they had a package for me and sent a link for me to open to get the shipping info.

I opened the link and immediately a virus attacked my computer and I could not get my computer to work properly, then an offer to clean up my computer and get rid of the virus appeared on the screen.

The first thing I did was go to the local post office and they informed me they never send out e-mails.

I took my computer to the Geek squad the they told me the info on my computer was a scam they heard about and it was infected. It cost me $200 for the Geek squad to fix my computer.

A couple of days later my watch came in the mail just like it was supposed to.

Had I not been waiting for a delivery I would never have opened that e-mail


Moral of story, don't open unsolicited e-mails and their links.
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Old 05-25-2014, 02:17 PM
 
1,107 posts, read 1,879,890 times
Reputation: 1573
Another scam is Geek Squad. You could have downloaded a free virus program called Malwarebytes that will clean up almost any virus. If your computer would not even start, you could have either gotten Malwarebytes or another free virus clean up program from someone elses computer, put it on a flash drive, and put it in your USB port, running the program upon start up. Or, you could have purchased a retail virus program for less than $50, started in safe mode by hitting F8 upon start up, and running the program. Seek the help of friends before paying Geek Squad again.
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Old 05-25-2014, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Florida
19,844 posts, read 19,943,516 times
Reputation: 23281
Even if you are expecting a UPS or FedX delivery and get an email about tracking a package, unless it is from where you bought something or you can prove it's FedX/UPS themselves (by checking at the email headers, for instance) don't use the link. Copy and paste the number into place after you go to the site itself by typing it in to your address bar.
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Old 05-25-2014, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Florida
19,844 posts, read 19,943,516 times
Reputation: 23281
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzeig104 View Post
Another scam is Geek Squad. .
That's not a scam. It's just a legal taking advantage of people that don't know any better.
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Old 05-25-2014, 02:31 PM
 
1,107 posts, read 1,879,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by old_cold View Post
That's not a scam. It's just a legal taking advantage of people that don't know any better.

okay. you win.
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Old 05-25-2014, 02:38 PM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
8,774 posts, read 14,891,494 times
Reputation: 11886
Quote:
Originally Posted by old_cold View Post
That's not a scam. It's just a legal taking advantage of people that don't know any better.
My son is a computer expert but he is not local and when he can't fix my problems over the internet by taking control he sends me to Geek squad.

Not all of us are experts.

The one good thing about the internet there are plenty of people to give you advice AFTER the fact.
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Old 05-25-2014, 03:43 PM
 
1,107 posts, read 1,879,890 times
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https://www.consumeraffairs.com/reta...eek_squad.html
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Old 05-25-2014, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
25,095 posts, read 23,986,585 times
Reputation: 31007
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDD View Post
My son is a computer expert but he is not local and when he can't fix my problems over the internet by taking control he sends me to Geek squad.

Not all of us are experts.

The one good thing about the internet there are plenty of people to give you advice AFTER the fact.
I would never hire Geek Squad; they wouldn't hire my son. When he was 3 years old, he was typing DOS commands to pull up his Mixed Up Mother Goose game. By the time he was twelve, he was troubleshooting and fixing most of our computer problems. If they wouldn't have him, I know that their priorities are skewed.
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Old 05-26-2014, 02:30 AM
 
Location: Haiku
4,188 posts, read 2,603,300 times
Reputation: 6172
Quote:
Originally Posted by old_cold View Post
Even if you are expecting a UPS or FedX delivery and get an email about tracking a package, unless it is from where you bought something or you can prove it's FedX/UPS themselves (by checking at the email headers, for instance) don't use the link. Copy and paste the number into place after you go to the site itself by typing it in to your address bar.
Unless you have an older computer that is running Windows XP or earlier, and are using an old browser, you should be OK even clicking on a suspect link. To install a virus on a computer with Windows 7 or 8 requires you to accept something from the web site, typically a download that then gets installed. If you never accept the download, the virus won't be installed. So-called "drive-by viruses" are very rare these days because Windows is much better about not allowing them. A drive-by is a virus that does not require you to click to accept it - just viewing an infected web page will infect your machine.

When you click on a bad link in an email, they are relying on gaining your trust in that link and getting you to accept a download. Often, a message will pop up saying you have a virus and they will clean it up for you - just click on the "accept" button. But what you are really doing is installing a virus.

So, the lesson is, never ever accept something to be installed on your computer unless you are 100% certain you know who you are dealing with. Furthermore, make sure you are using the latest version of IE or Firefox, or Chrome. Modern browsers have lots of features to prevent you from shooting yourself in the foot.

If you think you have an infected computer, I strongly advice you not to download anything from some place that claims they can clean it for you, except Microsoft. Microsoft has antivirus that is free and of course they are reputable. They won't hound you for a subscription or ads.

If you visit a web page and it is popping up messages saying you have a virus, just close the browser down. It is the safest way to get out of there. Some of those web pages try to prevent you from leaving the page, so closing the browser is the only way off of it.

Finally - disable Java. Not JavaScript (the two are different). It is typically an Add-in or Plug-in in the browser's configuration. The only known drive-by virus in the last year or so was with Java. If you believe you need Java, go to Oracle and get the latest version.
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Old 05-26-2014, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Florida
4,376 posts, read 3,716,488 times
Reputation: 4116
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
If it was an unsolicited call believe me microsoft DOES NOT CALL its computer users. Can you imnagine how much manpower that would take. These scams are all over the internet and the "Microsoft Tech Suport scam is a big deal.

Simply google Tech Support Calls Scam and you will find many entries. Here is only one.

Avoid Phone Scams | Cybercriminal Tech Support Scam | Security Threats
They did not say they were MS and I did not mean to imply that. But the calls were not random. I have only received two calls and both after I ran a program I unintentionly down loaded that made a big mess out of my comuter.
I think the caller wanted me to think they were MS or related to MS. My point is the call was not random and the hock is that know something about you and thus seem legit.
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