U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-23-2014, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,925,663 times
Reputation: 6716

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoByFour View Post
Our average day time temperature is 77 in the winter and 82 in the summer. Ocean water temp is between 77 and 80, year around. We do need an air conditioner, in fact don't even own one. Last hurricane was more than 20 years ago. We get enough rain that we rarely water anything on our land. Only trouble is, this is not anywhere near the east coast.
If you're talking about Iniki - that was one heck of a storm:

Hurricane Iniki - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

All it takes is one. FWIW - we were in Hawaii a few years after Iniki - and it was as devastating or perhaps more devastating than Hurricane Andrew.

In terms of what StressedOutNYer mentioned - I think he/she has understated the situation somewhat. Whether or not you're on low land - and whether or not you're really close to the coast - you can be at risk for flood. From things like rivers. Remember the floods in Vermont?

Vermont Flood / Irene Hi-Res Gallery - August 31, 2011

Also - although Congress has - at least temporarily - abandoned the Biggert Waters changes to the FEMA flood program (Flood Insurance Reform | FEMA.gov) - the issue isn't dead. Moreover - if you're anywhere near the coast - windstorm insurance can be a major issue. I don't know how many of you drove along I-95 post-Hugo - but that storm did major damage pretty far inland.

I don't think these things are necessarily deal breakers for a lot of people. But they can add considerably to the costs of homeownership and should be taken into account when exploring various areas. Robyn
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-23-2014, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,925,663 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by njkate View Post
Oh Lord yes....we were in Cape Coral Fl over the winter..more than likley the #1 reason I hate FL with a purple passion...WAY TOO MUCH TRAFFIC...ugh
There's a lot less traffic in north Florida than in south Florida. Robyn
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,954 posts, read 7,390,876 times
Reputation: 16283
Quote:
Originally Posted by njkate View Post
For me it would be Wilmington/Southport NC
Hubbie wants SW FL....I hate Fl with a purple passion, but he says NC isn't warm enough in winter, maybe so, but it can't be as cold as NJ.

I've now asked him if he wants that much warmth to check out the AL and MS gulf coasts..I'd be miserable in FL
Good choice - it is cooler in the winter but for someone use to 4 seasons, that can be a plus. I want a real change in seasons but not not to the extreme where I live now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Surf City, NC
364 posts, read 552,868 times
Reputation: 946
I live on Topsail Island in North Carolina. This winter was unusually cold here (as well as, I understand, in other parts of the country). We did have snow that turned icy and stayed around for a couple of days 'til it melted. Since they don't have the equipment to clear or salt any but the major highways here, we decided to stay put while it lasted. But, as I said, this was an unusual winter. On the barrier islands we seldom see snow and hard freezes happen a couple of times per winter, it's changeable from mild to cold. The ocean is a powerful moderating force when you are this close to it. It is definitely winter, but nowhere near as severe as further north. I use a light jacket for going around here and keep my parka for visits north to relatives in Maryland.
In the summer it is decidedly hot and humid, but the advantage of being on the island is that there is always a breeze. The ocean moderates the summer heat as well. I can still walk or bicycle outdoors through the summer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 10:45 AM
 
38,135 posts, read 14,902,572 times
Reputation: 24580
Quote:
Originally Posted by StressedOutNYer View Post
A caveat for anyone who is thinking of buying a house either ON or very close to (meaning within a mile or two) of the water along the East coast: Pay very close attention to the flood maps and also get at least one homeowners insurance rate quote on the house you're considering. You don't want to have gone to contract on a house and then find out, two weeks before the closing, that you either can't get normal (affordable) homeowners insurance at all, and that you'll have to end up paying triple for a high risk policy instead; or that if you want flood insurance it's going to cost you $$$$.

Be aware, if you've never lived on the coast or in a flood zone before, that premiums for flood insurance are going to rise dramatically over the next few years because FEMA will no longer be subsidizing them. Although you may not be required to have flood insurance, because you don't have a mortgage, you may nevertheless want it for peace of mind because no homeowners insurance covers flood damage.

Hurricane Sandy changed the insurance landscape for coastal areas just as much as it changed the physical one.
Just got back from a few days in Southport, NC. Lovely old coastal town but already so many tourists it was hard to find a parking spot even midweek.

Drove over to Oak Island, a beachy town without nearly as much traffic. Seemed like every other home on the beach was for sale. Locals said it was because of the flood insurance going up so much.

While Southport had a lot of older homes with front porches and all, many of the homes in Oak Island were mobile homes on lots. I suspect that instead of buying flood insurance, they just risk needing to buy a new mobile home if this one gets swept away. But don't know that for sure.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 12:26 PM
 
25 posts, read 37,567 times
Reputation: 39
I would suggest Cape Coral florida.
It is a quite large town (170,000 people)that has a small town feel. They host many festivals and city events and was one time rated best place to retire (Forbes.com/CNN.com). It has 2 beaches in south cape and two marinas ( Cape Harbor and Tarpon Point) both completely stunning! In it's sister city Fort Myers there are a lot of attractions such as a 1.1 million square foot mall Thomas Edison and Henry ford Museum many beaches and islands and other tourist attractions.
The price of living here is very cheap! You can build a 2200 sq ft house for 200,000 or less!
Cape Coral is also ranked 5th best mid sized city to live in the United States! (Movoto.com)
I hope this helps
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 12:30 PM
 
25 posts, read 37,567 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by njkate View Post
Oh Lord yes....we were in Cape Coral Fl over the winter..more than likley the #1 reason I hate FL with a purple passion...WAY TOO MUCH TRAFFIC...ugh
Uhm...I've lived here for 10 years and have never complained about traffic. There is 170,000 people in the summer months and 200,000 in the winter. And that is only because of the snow birds..lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 12:32 PM
 
9,296 posts, read 4,276,082 times
Reputation: 11032
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
I like the area around Southport, NC, mainly because there is housing there I would be comfortable in and because of the intracoastal waterway.

Another choice would be around Litchfield, Georgetown, Pawley's Island, SC.

And finally, Hilton Head and areas around Charleston. I particularly like Kiawah and Isle of Palms but missed my opportunity 30 years ago for buying at a good price at either of those locations.

I have a fondness for Savannah (some of my family is from Savannah) but housing is hit and miss.
For anyone who likes Hilton Head(very nice indeed), they should consider Amelia Island instead. It was developed by the same man, and it is of course further south with better weather. We use to vacation on Hilton Head until we discovered Amelia Island. The Plantation is a great place to vacation on AI, but owning property in there is very costly. Still other parts of AI can be purchased at more reasonable rates.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 01:11 PM
 
Location: NC
720 posts, read 1,484,895 times
Reputation: 1072
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
Just got back from a few days in Southport, NC. Lovely old coastal town but already so many tourists it was hard to find a parking spot even midweek.

Drove over to Oak Island, a beachy town without nearly as much traffic. Seemed like every other home on the beach was for sale. Locals said it was because of the flood insurance going up so much.

While Southport had a lot of older homes with front porches and all, many of the homes in Oak Island were mobile homes on lots. I suspect that instead of buying flood insurance, they just risk needing to buy a new mobile home if this one gets swept away. But don't know that for sure.
I have to add that the stick built homes far outnumber the mobile homes. Been going there since 1989 and have seen the first two rows of houses affected by a hurricane, but nothing further inland touched by water. A few trees and limbs knocked down on the inner island. A shame people have to sell due to the insurance rates.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 02:22 PM
 
38,135 posts, read 14,902,572 times
Reputation: 24580
Quote:
Originally Posted by poodlecamper View Post
I have to add that the stick built homes far outnumber the mobile homes. Been going there since 1989 and have seen the first two rows of houses affected by a hurricane, but nothing further inland touched by water. A few trees and limbs knocked down on the inner island. A shame people have to sell due to the insurance rates.
What's the town like? We ate dinner at Turtle Island Cafe. Seemed to be a lot of locals. The homes along the beach all seemed to be rentals. Inland, not so much.

We drove around several neighborhoods at the Turtle Island Cafe side of the main drag and most of them were mobile homes, mostly single wides. Though there were some stick built homes here and there. On the other side of the main drag, the beach side, those homes looked to be more stick built.

Just seemed to be a sweet, beachy town. There are condos going up on the Caswell Beach road and quite a condo development before you drive over the coastal waterway bridge. Few older hotels.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top